Goerner’s “I’ll Find Amelia Earhart” Conclusion

Today we conclude Fred Goerner’s 1964 Argosy magazine feature story, “I’ll Find Amelia Earhart.”  When we left Part III, former Navy men Eugene Bogan and Charles Toole had contacted Goerner and shared their mutual wartime experiences in the Marshall Islands that pointed to Amelia Earhart’s presence there, launching Goerner’s Marshalls investigations, which were much briefer and less productive than his Saipan research. 

We open the final part of “I’ll Find Amelia Earhart” as Goerner is contacted by another World War II veteran, this one from Saipan, who has some fascinating information to share:

Ralph R. Kanna, of Johnson City, New York, has worked seventeen years in a responsible position for the New York Telephone Company.  In 1944, Kanna was sergeant of the Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon, Headquarters Company, 106th Infantry, 27th Division, during the assault on Saipan.  Kanna’s duty was to take as many prisoners as possible for interrogation purposes.

“On Saipan, we captured one particular prisoner near an area designated as Tank Valley,’ ” wrote Kanna.  “This prisoner had in his possession a picture showing the late Amelia Earhart standing near Japanese aircraft on an airfield.  Assuming the picture of the aircraft to be of value, it was forwarded through channels to the S-2 intelligence officer.  But more important, on questioning of this prisoner by one of our Nisei interpreters, he stated that this woman was taken prisoner along with a male companion, and subsequently, he felt both of them had been executed.  From time to time, I have told these facts to associates, who finally have convinced me to write.”

Kanna went on to list three Nisei interpreters who served with his unit during that period:  Richard Moritsugu, William Nuno and Roy Higashi.

Joining Ralph Kanna and Robert Kinley, who claimed to have found photos of Amelia Earhart on Saipan, was Seabee Joseph Garofalo, pictured here on Saipan in July 1944.  While assigned to Naval Construction Battalion 121 during the invasion, Garofalo found a sepia photo of Amelia Earhart inside the wallet of a dead Japanese officer.  He lost the photo on Tinian several weeks later.  Garofalo, the founder and curator of the Bronx Veterans Museum, passed away in March 2016 at age 95.  (Courtesy Joseph Garofalo.)

I have located and spoken personally with both Moritsugu and Nuno.  Moritsugu, now living near Honolulu, is unwilling to discuss his part in the Saipan invasion.  Nuno lives in Pasadena, California, and indicates that he was not with Kanna that day in 1944.  I found Roy Higashi just three days ago.  He is living in Seattle, Washington, and almost seemed to be expecting my call.  He said he had something to tell me, but would rather do it in person.  Higashi is bringing his family to San Francisco on vacation, and will contact me on arrival.  I’m sorry I cannot include his information in this article because of the publication deadline.

Robert Kinley of Norfolk, Virginia, was a demolition man with the Second Marine Division.  Pushing inland from Red Beach One, his squad came upon a house near a small cemetery.  Kinley went inside to clear it of any booby traps.  On a wall, he found “a picture of Miss Earhart and a Japanese officer.  The picture was made in an open field, showing only a background of hills.  The officer wore a fatigue cap with one star in the center.” Kinley says he took the picture with him, but everything was lost in July 1944, when he was wounded.

Robert Kinley then added a bit of provocative information.  “The Japanese had a command post in a tunnel next to the house where I found the picture.  My demolition team closed up the tunnel.  You might be able to find more pictures or records in the tunnel.

Kinley sent along a map showing the location of the house, tunnel and graveyard.  It coincides almost perfectly with the area Devine was shown by the Okinawan woman.

In September 1962, I went back to Saipan for the third time, but I had to do it on my own time and money.  KCBS wasn’t uninterested, but there’s a limit to financial soundness in making assignments.  I couldn’t drop it, though; there was just too much to go on, and no one in official places had been able to satisfactorily answer any of the many questions raised by the investigation.

Fearing that I might have become prejudiced, I took along Ross Game, the editor of the Napa, California Register, consulting editor to the nineteen Scripts’ newspapers in the West and Secretary for the Associated Press on the Pacific Coast.  We picked up Captain Joe Quintanilla, Chief of Police of Guam, and his detective-lieutenant, Edward Camacho, and took them along, too.

In this September 1962 photo, California newspaperman Ross Game, who accompanied Fred Goerner during a few of his early 1960s investigations, including one on Saipan, is flanked on Saipan by Guam Detective Edward Camacho (left), and Capt. Jose Quintanilla, Guam Police Chief.

Things had changed in one year.  My, had they changed!  Commander Bridwell was gone; the Navy was gone; Mr. Schmitz was gone – and NTTU was gone.  I should say NTTU were gone, since there were eleven of them.

The fence gates were open, and we went in.  Commander Bridwell and the Naval Administration Unit had been a front for one of the most elaborate spy schools in the history of this or perhaps any country.  The faculty consisted of civilian professors of espionage, the very same men whom I had addressed that night at the club.  It’s hard to imagine the impact of coming out of the jungle and discovering a modern town of ninety two- and three-bedroom houses with concrete roofs, typhoon-proof and modern in every respect even to modern landscaping; a modern apartment house for the single members of the faculty; a library, snack bar, barber shop and theater-auditorium.  Seven of the NTTU training facilities were located on the north end of the island and four on the east.  For the spy-school student, there were sturdy, concrete barracks at each site and other concrete buildings in which classes were held.

For ten years, the students were flown into Kagman Field at night, taken in buses with the shades drawn to any of the eleven areas, trained in techniques of spying and a very specialized brand of guerrilla jungle warfare.  Most of them never knew where it was they were being trained.  When their courses were completed, they were dispatched on any one of a thousand missions, penetrating through or parachuting behind Communist lines.  Nationalist Chinese, Vietnamese, and men from other areas were brought to Saipan, trained and then assigned.

Where did the NTTU go?  Why did they go?

I can’t answer the first.  I don’t know that I want to.

The second has to do with the focus of international attention the Earhart story placed on Saipan twice within two years, but more importantly, the United Nations inspection team for the Trust Territory of the Pacific gave Commander Bridwell and the Navy bad marks in 1961 for the administration of Saipan.  They had done too much rather than too little for the people of Saipan.  It was out of line with what the Department of Interior was doing for the rest of the people of the Pacific area.  I don’t believe the UN team even knew about the NTTU.  They probably got the same trip to Bridwell’s quarters I did.  In any case, when the history of the post-World War II struggle between East and West is finally written, I’m sure Saipan and NTTU will be prominently mentioned.

Saipan’s Kagman Airfield, also known as East Field, fall 1944. Among the aircraft are Consolidated B-24 Liberators from  the 819th Bomb Squadron, of the 30th Bomb Group, C-47 Skytrains and, in the distance, a B-29 Superfortress.  Bruce M. Petty, author of Saipan: Oral Histories of the Pacific War (2009), wrote, “The CIA had a secret base on the north end of Saipan in the 1950s and early 1960s where they trained Chinese Nationalists to fight Chinese Communists.  Kagman field was used to fly in trainees at night were they were bussed to their quarters at the north end of the island.  The building still survive are currently being used by the CNMI government. We lived in one for four years.”

We did some more excavation around the perimeter of the cemetery; this time outside the northern end, but found nothing.  We needed Devine to show us the spot, but permission was still being denied to him.  We did find where the house Kinley had entered once stood, and we found a huge mound which must be the command post he speaks of.  It would be, of course, a major and expensive earth-moving job to open it up.

Ross Game, Captain Quintanilla, Eddie Camacho, Father Sylvan and I went back over every piece of testimony, and even managed to turn up some new leads.  The consensus:  They were more convinced than I.  Two American flyers, a man and a woman, bearing an almost unmistakable resemblance to Earhart and Noonan had indeed been brought to Saipan by the Japanese in 1937.

The most important event of the third expedition came one morning at the mission house.  One Jesus De Leon Guerrero, a native Saipanese, came to see me.  Father Sylvan served as interpreter.  Guerrero proposed a trade.  He had been collecting scrap from the war for years and had a mountainous pile.  If I would arrange a Japanese ship to come to Saipan to pick up his scrap, he would give me the conclusive answer to the mystery of the two American flyers.

I remembered several Navy and Department of the Interior people telling me that U.S. policy was that no Japanese ships were permitted to enter the former mandated islands.

I couldn’t have changed that policy if I had wanted to, which I didn’t.  No story can be bought without being tainted.  I told Guerrero, through Father Sylvan, that if he had anything to say to me, he’d better say it now.  There would be no deal.  Guerrero blinked, turned on his heel and walked out of the mission.  The most striking thing about the whole conversation was that I recognized Guerrero.  He was the native who had been in my Quonset that rainy night the year before.  Father Sylvan told me later that the rest of the natives fear Guerrero.  Before and during the war, Guerrero worked with the Japanese military police.

The trip in ’62 produced another vital piece of information.  Ross and I went down into the Marshall Islands, and found Elieu [Jibambam].  Elieu teaches at the Trust Territory school at Majuro.  He tells exactly the same story he told to Bogan and Toole in ’44.  The American flyers landed near Ailinglaplap in 1937.

Elieu Jibambam, one of the earliest known Marshall Island witnesses, though not an eyewitness, told several Navy men on Majuro in 1944 about the story he had heard from Ajima, a Japanese trader, about the Marshalls landing of the white woman flier who ran out of gas and landed between Jaluit and Ailinglapalap.”  Elieu’s account was presented in several books including Fred Goerner’s Search.  This photo is taken from Oliver Knaggs’ 1981 book, Amelia Earhart: her final flight.

And now, as you read this, I’ll once more be on Saipan.  There is one important difference this time.  Thomas Devine is with me.  After nearly a four-year effort, permission has finally been granted for him to enter the island.

Why has such an effort been necessary?  What about Japan?  This long after the war, wouldn’t she be willing to admit an incident involving two white flyers?

The answer is no.  It involves far more than the detention of Earhart and Noonan.  Japan has categorically denied building military facilities in the mandated islands prior to Pearl Harbor.  In the war crimes trials in Tokyo in 1946 and ’47, Japan stated, “The airfields and fortifications in the mandated islands were for cultural purposes and for aiding fishermen to locate schools of fish.”  It is obvious that Japan cannot admit an incident involving two American flyers before the war without also admitting a far graver sin – the necessity for covering up their activities in the mandates.  If Japan ever concedes that the islands were used for military purposes, it will represent a violation of the League of Nations Mandate, a breach of international law, a most serious loss of face and the loss of the last chance to get the islands back.

Is there any other way to clear up the mystery, through extant records perhaps?

I don’t know.  The records that might shed light upon this matter seem beyond our reach.  According to the United States Navy, Army and other departments of the Government, the following have been declared missing, destroyed, or returned to Japan:

  • Twenty-two tons of Japanese records captured on Saipan, which were never interpreted.
  • The radio logs of Commander Bridwell’s four United states logistics vessels.
  • Records of a physical examination of both Earhart and Noonan, including dental charts made by Navy Chief Pharmacist Mate Harry S. George, in Alameda, in the year 1937.
  • The large bulk of Naval intelligence records for the Pacific from 1937 to 1941.

In spite of the fact that the Navy sent the carrier [USS] Lexington to Howland Island in 1937 and spent some $4,000,000 in a fruitless search, their official position today, at least to CBS and the Scripps’ League newspapers, is that “the Earhart-Noonan disappearance is a civilian matter.  There has been and is no reason for this Department to make an investigation.”

Bridwell told me an ONI man conducted an investigation in 1960 after my first visit, and the testimony could not be shaken.  The Navy maintains there has been no investigation at all As recently as four months ago, Captain James Dowdell, now Deputy Chief of Naval Information in Washington, vehemently denied to Ross Game that the Navy was withholding any information, and indicated that the Navy hadn’t conducted any investigation.  Yet, just two months ago, the U.S. State Department stated in a letter to me, “The State Department does have a limited amount of information about the Earhart matter which is Classified, but the Navy Department has informed us that they conducted a complete investigation in 1960, and there’s nothing to the conjecture that Earhart and Noonan met their end on Saipan.”

(Editor’s note: Goerner was shown part or all of the then-classified 1960 ONI report in April 1963, and he commented briefly on its contents on pages 236 and 307 of The Search for Amelia Earhart, First Edition.  Based on the publication date (January 1964) of this article, he clearly had seen the classified report in plenty of time to mention it here. Why he didn’t disclose this fact in this article is unknown to this observer.)

Just before The Search for Amelia Earhart was published in November 1966, True (The Man’s Magazine) ran a lengthy preview, extracting passages directly from the book. True also ran this photo, of Thomas E. Devine, who finally made it to Saipan in December 1963, with Goerner, (seated right) and missionary priests Father Sylvan Conover (smoking pipe) and Father San Augustin, preparing to search for the gravesite Devine was shown by an unidentified Okinawan woman on Saipan in 1945.

As I said earlier in this article, I can’t really blame the Navy Department for its evasiveness.  The Navy was fronting, at any cost, for the CIA, and it’s going to be a wee bit embarrassing, at the very least, to clear the record now.

Were Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan on a spy mission in 1937?  I simply haven’t the space to begin that discussion here.  Let me simply say that those “two American fliers’ on Saipan are I believe, the key to an even more incredible story:  The twenty years in the Pacific before Pearl Harbor and the bitter battle between departments of our Government over what to do about the Japanese mandated islands.

There are many who say that the enigma of Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan is best left untold. Embarrassment of Japan at this time would not be wise, they say. What good can it do to rake over old coals?

My answer is a simple one.  With most Americans, the individual still counts.  Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan fought a battle for most of their lives against the sea and the elements, not against men bent on war.  We orbit men around our earth and turn our eyes to the stars and what may lie beyond because of the courage and contribution of such as Earhart and Noonan.

If they won their greatest victory only to become the first casualties of World War II, the world should know.  Honor for them is long overdue.

When all is considered, a single question remains:  If the two white flyers on Saipan before the war were not Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan, who were they?

 Within the next few days, we may know the answer.  (End of “I’ll Find Amelia Earhart.”)

Readers should note that this article well summarized the state of Goerner’s Earhart research in late 1963, before his fourth trip to Saipan in December 1963.  Some of Goerner’s most important findings and ideas would undergo radical changes in the coming years, and long before his death in 1994, he would actually renounce his belief in Earhart’s Mili Atoll landing.  In future posts I will endeavor to flesh out as much of these small mysteries as I can.

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58 responses

  1. As previously suqqested, In the end I believe we’ll find one Japanese officer held more than passinq interest in both Noonan & Earhart; used what information he qained by any means to his eventual missions of sinkinq the Panay, hijackinq the HI Clipper, planninq the Pearl Harbor attack to the last detail for Yamamoto (follow his carrier, the Kaqa from the Marshalls in ’37 to off Shanqhai that Dec. to off The Hawaiian islands in Dec. ’41). He had a thinq w/Mitsbishi too – he’s known as father of the Zero (thouqh he used his friend’s photo – the same friend who was first in/last out at P.H.) and JFK presented him the Leqion of Merit, Commander rank medal for all this in 1962 (the same hiqh decoration that Doolittle & Chennault received)… stranqe… he never admitted to takinq $3-mllion in qold bonds from a passanqer murdered alonq with the Pan-Am crew of the HI Clipper, nor his involvement n the Earhart/Noonan mystery, became a qeneral in Japan’s post-war Air Force & poliitician with a bronze statue in Hiroshima, passinq away a day shy of his 85th. birthday…

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    1. Of course, you are talking about General Minoru Genda, who died in 1986 in Tokyo at age 84. He received the Merit of Legion award from JFK in 1962. He helped American author Norman Polmar write the book “Aircraft Carriers” in 1969. While in DC addressing an audience he was asked, If Japan had obtained atomic weapons in WWII, would they have used them on the US? His answer was, “Yes, of course.”

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      1. William H. Trail

        Gentlemen,

        President Kennedy awarded the the Legion of Merit (LoM) to General Minoru Genda for his work in rebuilding the air arm of the Japanese Self-Defense Forces as well as for his post war cooperation with the United States. Genda was not the only former WWII enemy to be honored by JFK. Pre-war aviatrix, wartime test pilot, recipient of the Iron Cross First and Second Class as well as the Gold Medal for Military Flying, and ardent Nazi, Flugkapitan Hanna Reitsch was feted at a Kennedy White House dinner.

        All best,

        William

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  2. Wow, Mike – your contention that the government (and intelligence network) conspiracy to deep-six the Truth in this matter is well supported by Goerner’s excellent and detailed articles! What a cliffhanger – how long must we wait to hear the reasons why Goerner changed his initial theory?

    Liked by 1 person

  3. joseph chiarolanza | Reply

    Mike ,why did Fred renounce his beliefs regarding the milli landing ??

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    1. Joseph,

      I’ll get to that in good time. Meanwhile, why not get Truth at Last and find out for yourself. A small price to pay!
      MC

      Liked by 1 person

  4. What has caught my *attention, in this article; is the line about a captured prisoner, having in his possession, a photograph of Amelia Earhart. Now we all must ask ourselves? What on earth, would a Japanese soldier be doing with a photograph of Amelia Earhart? How did he obtain this and of all places – Saipan? Why is Amelia standing next to an officer, at an airbase, and by Japanese aircraft may I ask? Obviously she was there or should I ask WHY is she there? What is going on? Who took this photo?

    What possible scenarios could have occurred? Was she asked to pose next to this officer, as proof she’s there and with him? Was this his own personal *interest in her? Was this staged, as to look like she’s enjoying herself in the presence of the Japanese? Or was she carrying her own personal camera and asked Fred Noonan to photograph her with a Japanese officer; as if she was enjoying this comradeship with the Officer? Oh if we could only see this photo and what more it could reveal to us?

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    1. Douglas,

      I hate to “speculate,” but I think the simplest, most plausible explanation is that, early on in AE’s captivity, before her fate was finally decided upon by higher authority in Tokyo, she was treated as a “special celebrity guest with limited freedom.” We know that, unlike FN, she was housed for a time at the Kobayashi Royokan Hotel rather than in a cell at Garapan Prison (jail). Most likely AE was taken under escort/guard for the occasional outing, and the airfield would be a logical place to take her — a place she would have felt some small, fleeting degree of comfort and ease. Fliers like to talk about airplanes and flying and, to her captors thinking, putting AE in a familiar environment such as the airfield, around aircraft, she just might slip and inadvertently say something of use to the Japanese. As for the photo, the Japanese (no negative stereotype intended) are inveterate “shutterbugs,” and a modest personal camera in the hands of an Imperial Officer would not be unreasonable I think. The photo in question was most likely the 1937 version of today’s “selfie with a famous celebrity.” The photo’s final disposition is anybody’s guess. It could be destroyed, locked away in a government vault, or long forgotten in a trunk in someone’s attic. Who knows?

      All best,

      William

      Liked by 1 person

      1. very plausible description!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. If there was such a photo, I agree your argument is entirely plausible.

        The only negative would b the chances of a Japanese officer (or soldier for that matter) from 1937 or 1938 being on Saipan in 1944 are very slim. I can’t find a Japanese army presence on Saipan in 1937. Pretty much Navy troops.
        I guess, there is a small chance an officer could have been reassigned back to Saipan sometime after the war – but not much of a chance.

        Les Kinney

        Liked by 1 person

  5. seems to me that if the Japanese captured Fred and Amelia, there would have been much more value in using them as propaganda tools than just imprisoning them and eventually executing them.

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    1. William H. Trail | Reply

      George,

      That’s an excellent point, and I’m sure the merits of using AE and FN as propaganda tools to embarrass the United States and the FDR Administration were discussed at the highest levels in Tokyo. However, the Japanese were looking at the strategic “long view.” Remember, at the time the Japanese Mandate Islands were a “denied area” and therefore closed to all non-Japanese. Even the movements of the local indigenous population were tightly controlled because of the construction of fortifications and military build-up of those islands in preparation for the eventual open conflict with the United States for supremacy of the Pacific. The Japanese were not ready in July 1937 to abandon the facade of honoring the treaty requirements for no military construction or fortification of the Mandates. Using AE and FN for propaganda purposes at that time would have drawn much unwanted attention to Japanese activities in the Mandates, conflicting with the need to maintain secrecy.

      All best,

      William

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  6. William –

    Correct, the *point I am trying to make is, Amelia was on Saipan. No question about that, plain & simple. To think otherwise, or all those who have since, are full of beans – notably Ric Gillespie, Tom Crouch, and so many others. They take sides with the government PrOpAgAnDa & THE $$$$$$$$$ MONEY.

    If only somebody could locate that photo or negative? or any other picture than was taken of her, while in the hands of the Japanese. There must be something else on Saipan to substantiate Amelia’s presence there. Someday more proof will be revealed.

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    1. William H. Trail | Reply

      Douglas,

      Of course, more proof is always welcome. When it comes to supporting evidence more is always better. Recovering Joseph Garofalo’s lost photo or any other authentic photos of AE on Saipan would be an absolute coup. But, it’s not critical to making the case. That’s already been done as there is already such a preponderance of evidence to support the Mili Atoll/Saipan truth. I am absolutely confident that one day the truth will finally be acknowledged in the public square. Until then we must persevere, keep the faith, and soldier on.

      All best,

      William

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  7. We must remember that in today’s world, photos are not what they used to be. It would not take a very skilled Photoshop operator at their home computer to create a passable fake photo of AE in Saipan.

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    1. Ken,

      How right you are! That’s exactly why I specifically used the word “authentic.” But as I stated, it’s not critical. A good, solid case has already been made without photographic evidence.

      All best,

      William

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      1. William, Ken, Doug, et al,

        I’ve often tried to make the point, with little success, but you could have a true photo of AE being beheaded on Saipan and it would make absolutely no difference in the big picture. The American media would ignore it for the most part, and then find some way to deprecate and dismiss it. They are simply not interested in anything that advances the truth, and this policy hasn’t changed in 80 years — in fact, it’s gotten worse.

        We already have overwhelming evidence of Amelia’s Marshalls and Saipan presence and death, but the media continues to feed us anything they think can get away with, including 30 years of TIGHAR’s propaganda. The Daily Mail has lately been an exception to this, but consider where the Daily Mail is located — the United Kingdom, which is not part of the U.S. media establishment, at least not the last time I looked, and they seem at least a bit independent.

        You can stop dreaming that a photo might be found that will be a game changer, because it won’t happen. The History Channel disinformation drill in July, with the photo of no one discernible that was falsely claimed to be Earhart, should be instructive, but few are willing to listen. All the other evidence that was presented in that program was completely ignored after the media went after the phony photo claim and showed it to be bogus. A true and real photo of Earhart on Saipan or the Marshalls would never have been displayed in the History Channel production, because it would have made it much harder for the truth-hating media to discredit. But discredit it they would, rather than admit the obvious.

        Anyone who thinks the media is interested in being fair and impartial — not only in the Earhart case but in any important story — is simply out to lunch, ignorant and uninformed.

        MC

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      2. One positive thing is the Gardner Island or crashed and sank supporters will never find their concrete “evidence” at the bottom of the Pacific.

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  8. William –

    *Precisely and agreeable with your thoughts on the matter. Mike has educated so many of us, in the DiSiNfOrMaTiOn CAMPAIGN the media & government has played upon the American Public. The *TRUTH of Amelia’s fate will never see the light of day, if they can help it. So what are we left with? More HoAkY myths, far fetched stories, Gillespie gObBLe gook, Smithsonian PrOpAgAnDa, underwater explorations of everything and unable to locate Amelia’s Lockheed Electra 80 years later, etc. etc.

    Earhart researchers must present the OVERWHELMING EVIDENCE as Mike has, until *JUSTICE prevails, weakening the media’s grip or unveiling it’s masks.

    Doug

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Had my friend & I not been able to find what we believe as AE’s last personal camera in far-off NZ with a story weaned from the elderly NZ qentleman who says he purchased it and a handful of 1924 issue $20 qold certificates from a man he called Elieu when workinq for an Aussie construction Co. buildinq concrete structures for the CIA on Saipan in 1957… I would not have pursued the Japanese commander theory… but the bricks have very conveniently fallen into place. 1st. off – the camera has the exact replacemnt case AE bouqht & modified + the dent exactly where she had it strike a fuel-drum in Venezuela. The zip-purse that once held the $20s she would often mail to friends & family – IDs as havinq come from the Burbank, CA Touca Lake Club she & Putnam spent time at. The US Army never had the camera actual serial number on their manifest after shippinq the plane to Burbank post the HI qround-loop crash because AE was usinq it, and we have copy of the comedic film made by her friend A.Paul Mantz where he spent time bouncinq the port qear off the runway less than 2-weeks before the first attempt (the one that collapsed on full fuel load take-off!). Now there’s a bit of trace evidence that some monies funneled to Punam from a HI firm, tie him & eventually the Japanese commander (“father of the ZERO”) to Howard Huqhes “Racer” and some 1947 testimony Huhes refused to qive about his involvements with AE.
      However, we know the Japanese was in on sinkinq the USS Panay, his carrier, the “Kaqa” was off Shanhai; his personal Mitsubishi was in the air precisely then and there are photos of him practicinq the bombinq technique! He was also in on the “Kaqa” salinq the Marshall Islands at precisely the tme AE & FN would have been nearinq Millii Atoll and he sent two fiqhters aloft to ‘help in the search’ (which had not yet bequn by the US Navy?) Now – it’s conjecture that he wanted Noonan & AE was an added distraction (years later he said he knew AE personally!)… this is the part where the hi-jackinq of the HI Clipper had to be well- preplanned & FN knew all the route & facilities since he set them up in 1935, so testimony from a dead nun to other sisters on Saipan stated ‘she heard Noonan’s screams as the Japs cut off his toes’ at qarapan’s jail. W/O that info they couldn’t have pulled off the hi-jackinq; would not have had the 14-cyl. enqine for the ZERO who’s maqneto housinq on every wartme ZERO bore US serial numbers on the castinq.
      Pearl Harbor was this Japanese Commandr’s ‘shininq hour’ aboard the Kaqa and that’s well documented! There’s evidence that his friend Yamamoto met AE on Saipan, sketchy at best… but the US murdered him as ‘revenqe’ for P.H.??? Of course JFK also qave the Japanese a medal for all of this after lecturinq at US military colleqes. The cover-ups qo on & on!

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      1. The carrier you’re trying to spell is KAGA, not KAQA, Phil. There was another carrier, AKAGI, which former Japanese pilot Fujie Firmosa told Manny Muna he was assigned to when he was ordered to shoot down Earhart’s plane. See page 158 TAL for more on this claim. Neither carrier was anywhere near the Marshalls in July 1937, and so Firmosa’s claim appears to be pure smoke.

        Hill’s book is severely lacking in logic and documentation. I would recommend it only as an emergency fish wrapper. I read where Hill’s own son denounced the book as fantasy.

        MC

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      2. My SONY computer has lost the use of the key between F & H, so I make do with ‘q’… The Akaqa was the old translation for the Kaqa which at P.H. launched torpedo planes… those torpedos had been modified with wooden fins to run just below the surface by our Japanese quy who stole the show. They also were a revised type with hiqher explosive. You may not aqree with Hill (because he’s threatened to write “Traitor Twice” about AE, but the facts on the Clipper Hi-jackinq and the Japanese man are part of recorded testimony, thouqh he only admitted to dumpinq a barrel of oil at sea to throw-off USN search & rescue.
        No, they have not found the correct foundation on Dublon Is. where passenqers & crew are entombed in concrete, but quam researchers have made some proqress… there’s a place dubbed “Murders Row” once occupied by Japanese, and after ’43 by the entire US 7th. fleet, I have photos of that, and native testmony said the Japanese brouqht a sea-plane
        there & re-painted it with Jap naval risinq suns. Whether it was the one found on a beach near Hokaido in 1946 by US soldiers has become off-limits info by Naval Intel.
        I heard a different Japanese name for the pilot from the Kaqa in the Marshalls who said he shot up Earhart’s Electra and fuel was leakinq; he also said he saw the beach crash- landinq and reported location to his Commander.
        Althouh the Marshalls 1987 stamps show the damaqe wronq, islanders remembered, the starboard enqine stayed above hiqh-water allowinq the occupants to use the radio ’til fuel was qone… they had a yellow raft that qrew and made two trips to shore; possibly buryinq a metallic object by a prominent Hoa tree. The Japanese sent a small boat there to retrieve the flyers, testimony by the mate exists and the natives were amazed to see the Japanese sink one end of a barqe and winch the aircraft aboard then pump out the water and tow it out of the atoll to a ship watinq off the lee-shore (Koshu Maru)… story tellinq embelished by years???
        It’s so much better than a piece of aluminum with rivet holes that most likely came from a PBY and was with flotsum that accumulated on qardner Is. Or even bone-sniffinq doqs! But, it has qiven Kirbati artists somethinq to put on coins for tourists! Vanuatu does a better job! They may even have larqe coin likenesses of AE & FN + the Electra soon in colored enamels!

        Like

      3. You need a new keyboard, Phil.
        MC

        Liked by 1 person

      4. I have a replacement computer – except for the external DVD unit’s on back-order & now due in Mar. 1st. It requires pre-proramminq that unit before loadinq anythinq else; had it almost a month now! Cost of a new SONY keyboard $399/installaton $90 and they are on B/O from China. My new one’s an HP made by Dell and the DVD wait was part of the decent price! Back in business soon, I hope – Phil

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Phil,
        Where are you shopping, where a keyboard costs $399 plus $99 “installation”? Installing a keyboard means plugging it in, period!! And you ask us to take your comments seriously?
        MC

        Like

      6. I bought my present keyboard at Microcenter for $3. Works great.

        Like

      7. Philip Van Zandt

        For those that suqqested an aftermarket keyboard… that was my first attempt at a fix – but after three of them failed to work via USB ports, I tried a $65 version… it too was a no-qo, just like the USB-powered stereo speakers (2 sets) that failed… so I took it to a SONY authoriized repaiir facility, hopinq there was some proqram not functioninq. They convinced me it required the back-lit factory replacement as all the external functions are inteqral to the SONY key-board & essentially dead! The price incl. labor made me crinqe and they said I’d be better off with a new computer – of course one with all the photo memory like this (I have 8,864 photos alone stored on it – 22% of the available memory) as well as on a 3-terabyte W-D remote unit which is not usinq any USB ports but multi-pin attached as if it were a printer non- inteqral to the key-board. I load diqital photos & files copies only via that port as USB downloads stopped workinq aqes aqo…

        I bouqht an HP manufacturd by Dell on the advice of the Dell salesman, but it’s so compact (less than half the SONY’s thickness) that it requires a USB synced DVD unit… both are in S/S cases! Just awaitinq the DVD to show and sequence initially to the HP-Dell.

        ________________________________

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      8. Philip Van Zandt

        No one’s ever found Noonan’s there – strange!

        ________________________________

        Like

    2. Douglas,

      Leo Tolstoy once wrote, “The two most powerful warriors are Patience and Time.” Lies, deceit, and suppression of truth are not limitless and can only go on so long. The truth always wins in the end. As far as TIGHAR and The Smithsonian are concerned, I just shake my head and smile.

      All best,

      William

      Liked by 1 person

  9. I hope this strinqs thinqs toqether that have been over-looked, forqotten, or taken in other context… there’s a qreat book about the HI Clippr hi-jackinq by Chas. Hill entitled: “Fix on the Risinq Sun” and another on the PANAY EVENT (sinkinq) by Icenhower – read ’em!

    Like

    1. William H. Trail | Reply

      Philip,

      I did read Charles N. Hill’s, Fix on the Rising Sun. Mr. Hill’s scenario is way too complicated and dependent on split second timing and all aspects going exactly to plan to be plausible. The keys to any successful operation are Simplicity and Flexibility, as well as a contingency plan or two tucked away in your cargo pocket. Believe me, nothing ever goes strictly according to plan. “Murphy” always manages to tag along on the manifest. Mr. Hill’s overly complicated, pinpoint aerial navigation machinations are totally unnecessary to accomplishing the alleged Japanese skyjack mission. Once that last radio transmission was made, PAA’s Hawaii Clipper was quickly and ruthlessly seized, before anyone on board realized what was happening much less had time to react in any way, and brought under absolute total control. As an aircraft needs to be transmitting for a receiving ground station to obtain an RDF fix, NC14714 effectively disappeared once the radio was secured or otherwise rendered inoperative. With the crew and passengers subdued and under control (if not already murdered), all that remained for the Japanese skyjackers was to fly their course direct to Truk. A bold, simple plan well executed.

      Like

  10. William –

    FDR sent Amelia & Fred Noonan into HARM’S WAY, yet he didn’t have the guts to save them, from the CRUELTIES of the Japanese. The BLAME rests squarely upon FDR. He didn’t intervene on their behalf, kept quiet and left them for dead….
    Naval Intelligence manufacturered this LIE about them gone missing. It’s an OUTRAGE to have abandoned them and even worse to mislead the American Public all these years. Those who continue perpetrating these lies against Amelia Earhart & Fred Noonan should be held accountable and publicly disgraced; not held up by this CoRrUpTeD MEDIA of ours.

    Doug

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    1. Doug,

      When the truth is finally acknowledged in the public square, there will be a lot of folks with egg on their face.

      All best,

      William

      Like

      1. thanks Les Kinney.

        It is Bernard Beruch I am having trouble putting any stock in.

        keep looking — maybe only up. Jerry

        Like

    2. I have been trying to find if Bernard Baruch ever said anything about Amelia Earhart. Are we allowed to make asumption about what he knew and did say.

      thanks,
      Jerry

      “Amelia told me many things, but there were some things she couldn’t tell me. I am convinced she was on some sort of a government mission, probably on verbal orders.” — Amy Earhart, Amelia Earhart’s mother, New York Times, July 25, 1949.

      According to Margo de Carrie, who handled the clerical details of Earhart’s round-the-world flight, another strange thing happened during the period of time between her first and second attempts. Presidential advisor Bernard Baruch began meeting with Earhart and Putnam at their home in Hollywood to discuss with them the possibility of “volunteering for an intelligence mission that would be assisted and underwritten by the military.” Shortly thereafter says de Carrie, bills for aircraft and other expenses stopped arriving at the Putnam’s home (Brink, 103).

      Like

      1. Don’t put much stock in Brink.

        Years ago, I tried unsuccessfully for Brink to discuss his findings. Another researcher in my area (Seattle) tried as well. Brink lived in the Seattle area and was uncooperative. Brink had met and became friends with Joe Gervais. Much of Brink’s material seems to have come from Gervais and Klass 1970 book “Amelia Earhart Lives.” Brink did travel to Saipan and the Marshall Islands and did interview Bilimon Amaron. Brink’s interviews of the Heine Brothers seem apocryphal.

        Brink’s cite alluding to Decarie, (Brink 103) seems to be a Gervais interview. Brink’s source is stated as “Interview of deCarrie, August 1980”. Yet, when Brink has personally interviewed someone, his appendix clearly describes it as an “author interview…” Although Gervais conducted some fine early research, his credibility was extinguished with the release of “Amelia Earhart Lives.” That book is laughable.

        Brink and Gervais insinuated Earhart engaged in a spy endeavor on behalf of the government. Almost of the provenance associated with this theory comes from Decarie.

        So, the questions that need answering are: 1) Did Decarie really say in vague statements she saw Earhart meet with Baruch, or that Earhart was involved in an intelligence mission of some sorts? 2) Could Decarie have been in a positon (mostly unpaid) as a personal assistant to Earhart overhear pertinent conversations? 3) Is there source material to substantiate these alleged Decarie statements?

        Did Decarie really did say Earhart met with Baruch. Yes.
        Did Decarie say Earhart was involved in some sort of government mission. Yes.
        Did Baruch travel to the west cost at the time Earhart was preparing for her last flight. Yes. (Several years ago, I documented Baruch’s travel in an email exchange with Mike.)
        Is there primary source material? Yes, some.
        Is Decarie a credible witness? I’m not sure.

        Goerner first interviewed Decarie in 1964 or 65. He must have promised he wouldn’t use her name. As a researcher that’s a good thing. Decarie wasn’t seeking publicity. Decarie is described as Earhart’s “secretary.” I believe this first Goerner interview was over the telephone. In the interview, (see Goerner Page 202) Decarie talks of the government’s involvement with Earhart’s last flight. She does not mention Baruch. In 1969, three years after Goerner’s book was published, Goerner wrote Decarie and asked if he could meet her in Los Angeles. Decarie agreed. However, I don’t know if that meeting took place. I am not sure Goerner ever interviewed Decarie in person. Possibly, Mike might know that answer.

        Don Kothera and his wife interviewed Decarie over the telephone in 1968. Among other things, Decarie again insinuates a government involvement with Earhart’s last flight and this time mentions Baruch.

        Gervais interviewed Decarie more than once. The first interview seems to have been in the mid to late seventies. There is some intrigue associated with these Gervais/Decarie interviews which I am not going to elaborate. Allegedly, Decarie mentions Baruch and Army/Air Force involvement with Earhart last flight. Allegedly, Decarie says Earhart met with these government representatives at March Field in the spring of 1937.

        Another researcher interviewed Decarie several times in 1980 and 1981. They became good friends. By this time, Decarie was diagnosed with breast cancer and died not long after these series of meetings. During those interviews, Decarie again mentions Baruch and said she personally acted as Baruch’s “chauffeur “during visits with Earhart prior to the last flight. Like her statements to Goerner, Decarie said she was sworn to secrecy by the government and was not at liberty to answer specific questions.

        Decarie also gave an interview to a reporter in 1966. During that interview, Decarie said “she [Earhart] had many meetings with government men.”

        You decide.

        Les Kinney

        Liked by 1 person

      2. You are walkinq on fresh qround here, to me at least, but I think our “shadow qovernment” has hid many thinqs far too lonq. I used to wonder about that letter that AE sent to FDR askinq about air-to-air refuelinq – did it exist in 1936-’37? Maybe we only heard about such in 1950 & after. Was it an Earhart dream, or had she witnessed such at a US airbase???
        I was told by a qood friend flyinq a WW ‘Dakota’ (C-47) from way down-under to do a HUMP recreation fliqht last year, that when they refueled in Densepar, a man on the qround-crew spoke qood Enqlsh and wanted to show them an old cast bronze plaque that once was placed at the terminal entrance back in1946. Unfortunately no one took a photo of it, but supposedly it stated that Amelia Earhart & her naviqator F. Noonan, fresh from Pan American Airways stopped there & met with officers from a 7th. Fleet American vessel (not normally seen alonq the British Straits Settlments) for a few hours… and went on to mention the riqors they faced ahead enroute to Darwin, Lae and beyond. Larry said the plaque was beat-up and appeared to have been in the scrap bin for some time, perhaps years. There was no modern replacement visible in or at the sparklinq new terminal. Was a ‘clue’ purpously discarded??? A Pacific fleet vessel must have been an unusual port siqht!

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  11. Amelia thouqht she had another ally in the White House… one who was both secretary of the Treasury & confidant of FDR & between Elanore R. – Do you remember that ’37 dictaphone recordinq between Morqanthau and “Tommie” Thompson, Elanore’s secretary where they discuss whether to allow A. Paul Mantz in on the real story, or keep him in the dark as well? Of course, he quessed correctly much more, but could do next to nothinq…
    In my personal judqement, based on items believed to have been AE’s because of where found she had two “A” series Moranthau siqned dollar-bills – one had a US Customs stamp issued at Lonq Beach ’36 affixed to the upper R.H. corner (her cost for the return of a damaqed Electra from HI Territory. The other dollar-bill a sort of ‘short-snorter- and hand-written upon it was “Best wishes” siqned by “Tex” Walker of Pan Am, the American she met next to last eveninq in Lae, and stood beside in a qroup-photo by the Electra that next morninq that she & Noonan headed off Eastward; supposedly she said to Walker who cautioned her about naviqatiion to Howland Is. “I am not doinq as advertised, on the morrow” but divulqed no further info. Those two bills were found wrapped in an old brown paper toqether, folded & stuffed in a camera case behind what two of us believe was her last personal camera brouqht out of Saipan in 1957. We think they were a clue that she trusted Morqanthau to help, but he hadn’t… only a quess! There were other clues found as well, and a somewhat demented old man had this all in a wooden box on New Zealand’s Isles for nearly 60-years – except he had found AE’s stash of $20 qold banknotes early-on and was the first person to be able to spend them and did (they brouht him more than he qave his Sapan friend, Elieu for all the items) accordinq to his nephew, just a kid in ’57.
    You miqht recall also that Walker was 1st. officer on the hi-jacked HI Clipper – whch s why his informaton on meetinq AE & Noonan in Lae ddn’t surface for almost 50-years!

    As for the biq “T” qroup of pervercators – I sent them low-earth-orbit ultra clear photos of Niku’s laqoon showinq definite traces of massive bottom-dredqinq in 2010… and they denied is statinq it was camera sweep pieceinq – funny – it showed only in the laqoon and nowhere else??? Maybe a $150,000 yearly paycheck for husband & wife + all they can make from sponsored T-shirts, jackets, patches, investors, etc. will make liars of those who’s minds are closed to the truth… even when the preponderance of evidence and recorded statements of hundreds of Chamorro and other Saipanese says Milli Atoll!

    One cautionery note about Electra parts in Japanese mandate Is. Under license from Lockheed, the Japanese produced approximately 115 Electra-type aircraft durinq WW II.
    Most were used by the military hierarchy with bias toward IJN Admirals… but not our man Yamamoto!

    Like

    1. Phil,

      Your comment about Mark Walker, “The other dollar-bill a sort of ‘short-snorter and hand-written upon it was ‘Best wishes’ signed by ‘Tex’ Walker of Pan Am, the American she met next to last evening in Lae, and stood beside in a group-photo by the Electra that next morning that she & Noonan headed off Eastward; supposedly she said to Walker who cautioned her about navigation to Howland Is. ‘I am not doing as advertised, on the morrow’ but divulqed no further info” is quite interesting.

      I have several references to Walker, some in the Amelia Earhart Society Newsletters, all in connection to a letter in Shipmate Jan-Feb 1987 magazine, by R.B. Greenwood ’43, referring to an article in November ’86 Shipmate,”The Search for Amelia Earhart”, by Capt. William B. Short, Jr, USN (Ret). The following comes from Paul Rafford’s 2006 book, Amelia Earhart’s Radio, page 25:

      “Yet Mark Walker, a Naval Reserve Officer, heard something different from Earhart. I heard about Mark from his cousin, Bob Greenwood, a Naval
      Intelligence Officer. Bob wrote to me about Mark and what he had heard. Mark Walker was Pan Am copilot flying out of Oakland. He pointed out to Earhart
      the dangers of the world flight, when the Electra was so minimally equipped to take on the task. Mark claimed Earhart stated: ‘This flight isn’t my idea, someone high up in the government asked me to do it.'”

      Nowhere can I find any reference to Walker’s presence on Lae, New Guinea, either during the time of Earhart’s last flight or any other time. Please provide your source for your assertion that Amelia Earhart posed for a photo with Walker, “the American she met next to last evening in Lae, and stood beside in a group-photo by the Electra.” If you can’t provide your source, I will assume you don’t have one, and have fabricated the entire statement.

      MC

      Like

      1. For a number of years I had a banknote siqned by an M.A. Walker w/Pan Am written next to it in what appeared to be a different hand, there were in addition as I recall four other siqnatures, one beinq female, then I found a photo of 3 men & a woman passenqers awaitinq boardinq of a Pan Am Clipper and an officer assistinq in the process… they all seemed to match those siqnatures and I received confirmaton from a man on quam then doinq research on the hi-jackninq. At the time I owned a couple Kodak cameras with history tyinq them to Amelia Earhart and packaqed in one of their shppinq contianers were a couple Utah Hotel luqqaqe labels (almost threw them away, but as a whim decided to advertise how & where found and made a rediculous price of $60. Within 2-hours they were sold to an Earhart researcher, who often says thinqs of the avatrix ‘talk to him’ – if I said that havinq the cameras within my house had a similar effect, you’ll call me a nut – but it did set me off on a trail of tyinq a lot of stuff that just seemed to appear in photos & relevance form that mht never have paid any attention to otherwise – one of those was findinq a photo of a local qroup assembled outside and aft of the port winq of Earhart’s Electra w/o Noonan in siqht (unless he was takinq the photo), and closest to that door was a tall man in a sun-helmet and a tall lady – both identified as “Tex” Walker & Amela. Do I still have it? NO, but Roqer Peard (“Woody Roqers”) the man with the Earhart ‘stayed here while Lockheed techs worked on her Veqa’ Utah Hotel labels saw the photo and bouqht that siqned Pan-Am Clipper banknote & accompaninq photo from me. [my old computer hard dirve qot wiped clean and lost a couple thousand pix.] There are possbily 150 + other photos of Earhart in various places & poses, and think I’ve searched 99% of them… n all 3 have alluded me!
        As for those two initial cameras, I have very qood history that one was inside a wooden desk with lots of Earhart poems, pix, notes on Thanksqivinq day 1935 while Putnams were in CA and Amelia on a speakinq tour. There was a fire at the Rye, NY Putnam estate (they accepted $75,000 insurance and sold the land), but the fire, while damaqinq 70% of the place beyond repair, was put out by local area volunteer firemen. Now one of these was named “Bernie” and he knew next to nothinq about the camera in the sinqed leather case, but he scooped up some papers (amonq them the luqqaqe labels) and books and put the camera in his pocket still warm.
        Now Bernie’s wife knew Amelia as a neiqhbor and celebrity, and in 1938 she wrote a letter to Amelia, sealed it in an airmail envelope and had it sent by the first ever airmail delivery to Rye that went by seaplane (I opened it in 2006 and read the ramblnq letter) – which stated she hoped the Japanese were treatinq Amelia ‘kindly’ and that “Bernie saved a few thinqs for when you qet back for a visit with dear qeorqie”. What she didn’t know was that Bernie made two trips to Eastman-Kodak – first to have the camera inspected (had to leave it), and sometime after the Christmas holidays went to qet it & paid the $20 for servcinq and $6.55 for a new leather qenric case (fit three models) so which he stuffed a waded-up paqe from the Jan. ’36 NY Times Sunday suplement as it was about 1″ lonqer than the oriqinal. Before Eastman went into “Camera bankruptcy” repair records were available – so althouh qeo. Eastman did not keep owner’s names names (for fear of beinq sued), repair records by serial number were available.
        The other camera was left by Putnam & Earhart at a Hollywood camera shop because it was a european model and required chanqinq out some parts & an adaptor for use with US tripods (AE’s fine tripod and a self-timer that could be fitted to the camera were in a sort of qym-baq which rotted over the years and was taped with duct-tape when sold at auction by the New Enqland Photoraphy Assoc. in 1967 (the Hollywood Kodak place made the repairs, but it was never picked-up and they went out of business eventually with all items beinq auctioned off at an unknown date. The most probable reason for “Mr. & Mrs. Earhart” not retrievinq it was that Putnam bouqht Amela the very latest, improved, slimmer model that Kodak put out in 1936 (and I believe that one came from Saipan and it has been examined & thorouqhly photoraphed.)
        Note: “Woody Roqers’ has offered to buy either one of those cameras, but they are now held by a CA not-for-profit oranization with all the proofs & parts for possible trade to The Museum of The Pacifc (intrested) and another in China with a huqe display of WW II airman’s cameras collection… and I’ll admit only that when they were at my place I was intriqued enouqh to ask questions of “Amela” throuqh a well-respected Medium on-line & recorded – ‘her’ answers were a bit too qeneralized, like ‘AE’ said how she died was not important, it was how she lived’ and when asked was she happy, the reply was ‘I am now, but many thinqs troubled me for twice my lifetime, until I realized they could not be chanqed by returninq’. We just never qot lines from “Couraqe is the price… or any poetry! BTW, the discusson with Mark “Tex” Walker has been taken from his notes 50+ years after his murder, and his wife read them a bit differently to Charles Hll than to another man who was head of qeneral electrc Jet propulson for years. We’re sure that FDR & Morqanthau sent some kind of qeneralized idea of what they (Naval Intel) needed – either at Densepar airbase, or in Darwin where they dumped the parachutes, RH steerinq-yoke, rear wheel, Oxyqen bottle(s) etc. Pan Am pretty much co-ordinated on fixes and some at the Itasca end were positive AE never intended to land at Howland Is. However, there are many aerial & on-board photos of the Japanese aircraft carrier “Kaqa” in places where AE & FN just miqht have strayed on purpose, and if I was to quess it took Hirihito & IJNAF a few extra days to conclude the Electra pair were spies MOL sent from heaven and used them to their advantaqe… no bodies were returned because it may even have been foretold as a bit of a plan cominq toether!

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      2. You need to write much more concisely, Phil, and to think more cogently as well. His name is WOODY PEARD, also known as Woody Rogers, to begin with. I have corresponded with Woody occasionally, and he sent me a newspaper clip from 1937 that I have on my wall. Woody was also a contributing member of the AES and I saw all his messages beginning in 2002. I’ve never heard, read or seen anything Woody said that indicated he had a photo of Mark Walker on Lae with Earhart and the Electra. Period. Lately Woody has gone missing and I rarely hear from him, so I’m not going to worry right now about whether he sees this or not. If he does, and he replies, of course I will post it.

        Meanwhile, Phil, you have no solid basis on which to write that Walker was on Lae with Earhart before she took off. Of course it’s possible, but when nobody else has ever hinted at it — and why would it be such a great secret? — this claim strains credulity. You want us to think about you as you do yourself — that you some special knowledge about the Earhart case — but in fact you have nothing but old rumors and speculation to offer, and you can’t cite a single source for your blather.

        MC

        Liked by 1 person

      3. First off I have the mailinq address and a photo of “Woody” with his motorcycle he sent after receivinq the luqqaqe labels and tellnq me how he was planninq to use qround-penetratinq radar on Taroa lookinq for the covered Japanese bunker that held the Electra remains, while avoidinq un-exploded US ordinance. The ship to name: “Roqer Peard” and that’s the way it’s listed on Bay as well! ‘ll have to check other people I know, who know & correspond with him. Since you seem not to believe me – please check with “Woody” if he has, or had that siqned banknote from Clipper passenqers & Walker.
        Secondly, I did have the photo in question, and other researchers had seen it in e-mails. It has to have been available on-line for me to copy it.. I’ll keep searchinq!

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      4. Woody has had this Taroa idea for decades, which is unfortunate as he has been quite misled, and has ignored the mountain of evidence that Amelia’s plane was buried on Saipan, as well as Amelia herself.

        As for you, Phil, you continue to tell dubious tales. Earlier I missed the below from you, about your “contact” with Amelia through a “well-respected” online medium:

        “I’ll admit only that when they were at my place I was intriqued enouqh to ask questions of “Amelia” throuqh a well-respected Medium on-line & recorded – ‘her’ answers were a bit too qeneralized, like ‘AE’ said how she died was not important, it was how she lived’ and when asked was she happy, the reply was ‘I am now, but many thinqs troubled me for twice my lifetime, until I realized they could not be chanqed by returninq.’ ”

        Why do you think we need to know this?
        MC

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    2. Phil– The “Electra-type” aircraft license-built in Japan were based on the Model 14 Super Electra. Although similar in overall layout including twin vertical stabilizers, it was larger and different in most details. The characteristic which makes it easily recognizable as not a Model 10 or 12 is the elliptical cross section of the fuselage and the somewhat “potbellied” appearance of the lower fuselage. There were approx. 240 built by Kawasaki and Tachikawa. Those aircraft caused recognition problems for Allied pilots due to the similarity with Allied aircraft also derived from the Model 14.

      At the same time there were a number of Model 10 and 12 operated by airlines and military in the far Pacific pre-war. The Model 12 is easily confused with the Model 10 since it was essentially a “shorty” version of the 10. I believe the final disposition of all the civil Model 10 and 12 is known. However, the Netherlands East Indies Army Air Force operated 37 aircraft based on the Model 12, 20 Model 12-26 transports, and 17 Model 212 “bomber trainers.” The bomber trainers were probably intended for use as light bombers. It is possible that some of those could have been captured and impressed into service by the Japanese.

      Finally the IJN purchased one Model 10 designated KXL-1 ostensibly for evaluation as a multi-engine trainer but more likely for technical intelligence. It might have been used as a transport during the war.

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  12. If anyone is interested further in the CIA on Saipan – hit your local library up for copy of “IMPOSSBLE MISSION” – it’ll most likely be a soft-cover that has been re-done and some of it covers Chennault & Willhauer’s China Air Transport (which was fully bouqht out by 1955 and re-named AIR AMERICA – of which I had some personal experience durinq the chanqe from CAT’s C-46s & C-47s to C-119s n French roundels that flew very low over Ho Chi Min territory and took reqular qround qunfire as a matter of daily duty. Had you been able to purchase a copy book when new, you miht have found a cupon in the mddle for a a ‘deal’ on surplus CIA hard cases used to transport “remains” in – they were literally indestructable polished ABS with hidden wheels & pull up handle. Cost – del’d to your door was $19.95 (cost to taxpayers was near 20X that!)… qave mine to my son-in-law in 2008 and he still uses it to haul his qas-mix dive qear in; these were never opened by airport security in the CIA-use days and that seems to still be true (the lockinq mechanism was at all 4 corners).
    There was also a story in a British maqazine by a woman who slipped in on a list of mostly male passnqers for the two fliqhts daily from quam to Saipan, but that wasn’t her tarqet – Sherrey Wine (actiual last name of Winehouse) was bound for Tinian to take sunset photos of the then rusty atom-bomb loaders, and she hired a small native-run boat, did exactly that her first day there. However she was seated behind “3 quys in dark suits, discussinq Amelia Earhart and what they had come for – a camera supposedly on Saipan. She found a hotel near Aslito airfield for the niqht and took the noon return fliqht back to quam… this time she sat across the aisle from the same 3 men – who had a rather empty briefcase and spoke about the reports of failure they’d be makinq, as their contact was no lonqer on Saipan.
    Accordinq to Sherry – when they did notice her, she just smiled and waved, lookinq next out the window. Naval Intel, the commander there-of had made a mistake, thinkinq some CIA visitor apparently drank Sherry! What else could he say? That took place n 1958.
    Miss Winehouse wrote the article with her sunset photos and published it with a foot-note about the Earhart bit around a month later… MI-6 took notice and… the rest is history! All know is it was n a Brtish Travel maqazine as popular then as CondeNast.

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    1. William H. Trail | Reply

      Philip,

      I’ve tried looking online for the book, Impossible Mission, but haven’t come up with anything. If you could provide the author’s name that might help. Thanks.

      All best,

      William

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      1. When you’re someplace between 80 & 90 as I am, you forqet exact names, so I apoliqize… had to look thru my photos for the cover pix of the book I sold nearly 10-years aqo alonq with Claire Lee Chennault’s last Kodak 60 series movie camera used when he was on Taiwan ‘runninq’ CAT… eventually I found it (despite the fact that there is a book about the CIA in Asia with the exact title I erroneously provided previously). Try PERILOUS MISSION by Wm. Learey. If I knew how to add a photo here I would provide a view of the cover… so there would be no mistake in ID-inq it at the library. Remember this was a real airline that beqan in Shanqhai in 1946 and it competed with others until the CIA decided they’d chanqe the name to Air America. Many pilots were former Flyinq Tiqers and in the beqinninq it was composed of surplus C-47 & C-46 plus a dozen Stinson ‘hoppers’ used to spy on the communists from a secret airfield near Kweilin and another on Hainan Is. Mao tolerated it’s manland existence until Oct. 1949 but it already had a home in Taipei & in Hualien across the N. end of the island (Cheennault’s bronze bust and two US white marble pillar memorials that Madam Chainq commissioned were moved from Taipei New Park to Haulien 10-years back. I had a flqht into Haulien on Everqreen “Hello Kitty” in 1999 and the US-built 8000′ twin runways stop at the Pacific beach, or start there if you are landinq trom Tokyo or other islands.

        Liked by 1 person

    2. My dad worked for Slick Airways and Flying Tiger Lines in the early fifties. Slick and FTL were co-located at Lockheed Air Terminal in the same hangar complex. Earl Slick knew Bob Prescott and the other FTL founders from China during the war. Earl Slick flew C-47 over the Hump.They didn’t compete for the same business at the time. Slick was well financed since Earl and his brother Tom had inherited an oil fortune and they did a lot to help FTL in the early days.Tom was later known for his interest in the Yeti. I believe he served in the OSS in Asia during the war although officially USN.

      There was often a very handsome CAT DC-6B (freighter) parked on the ramp used by Slick and FTL. It made a weekly round trip between Taipei and L.A. Slick serviced the aircraft. It had an unusual configuration according to my dad. Immediately behind the cockpit was a small passenger compartment with a head, galley, and 6 or 8 first class seats. Several times a year Madame Chaing would arrive on the flight and then spend days on a massive shopping spree packing the aircraft with personal goods–clothing, shoes, handbags, accessories, furniture, appliances, etc. Once, when the plane was shortly due to depart on the return flight a load of goods arrived at the last minute and my dad and some other mechanics were conscripted to help load cargo. (Your tax dollars at work early Cold War style).

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  13. William H. Trail | Reply

    Philip,

    No apology necessary. Many thanks for the book title and author. Much appreciated!

    All best,

    William

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Has anyone other than myself ever asked questions about what appears to be a photo of Putnam, possibly a Kennedy (the airman who died in Europe in 1944); an obvious IOC offcial; AE (the only one besides Putnam’s doq lookinq at the camera) and a US Naval air offcer 90-deqrees turned toward Putnam & holdinq up the opposite end of an IOC flaq of which Putnam has the other in his qrasp. No date/where taken, an apartment bld’q on the LHS; possibly a flaq-pole w/ totally limp flaq in the backround. To my eyes it looks like a publicity photo demonstratinq Amelia’s fliqht was sanctioned by the Internat’l Explorer’s Club. But what a dis-interested smirk AE has on her face! I use it as my screen-saver!

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  15. Be interested to see that photo. Is it published somewhere?

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    1. William H. Trail | Reply

      Ken,

      I’ve looked through my collection of AE and related books and haven’t found the photo Philip spoke of. If it is anywhere I’d bet it is in the Purdue University Archives and Special Collections.

      All best,

      William

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      1. In today’s world of instant everything, I don’t plan to travel to Indiana to see a photo. It would be neat if someone could upload it somewhere.

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      2. You can see what is available at Purdue at their online site. I’ve seen nothing to indicate the photo in question is there.
        MC

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  16. Was the alleged gravesite shown to Devine by the Okinawan woman in 1944 or 45 ever excavated? It’s unfortunate that Goerner & co. didn’t deal with Devine more honestly. Devine would probably have been more cooperative and we might know more than we do now.

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    1. Negative. See pages 226-228 Truth at Last for discussion.
      MC

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  17. Speaking of gravesites….. what is thought of this “6 ft below what would have been the top soil in 1942”? More simply put, the gravesite where the blindfold was found? The only thing that I find phenomenal about that is before the fact they mentioned there was a blindfold, they dig it, then find sure enough a blindfold.

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    1. Gene,

      You refer to Buddy Brennan’s alleged find of the blindfold he claimed AE wore as she was executed and dumped into a hole on Saipan, according to his witness Nieves Cabrera Blas, who he interviewed on Saipan in 1983. I don’t know anyone who buys this story, because why would a cloth blindfold survive intact in a hole from 1944 until 1984, when all the bones were gone? See p. 228-232 for full discussion. Brennan did a few important interviews, but Mrs. Blas’ account is dubious, in my opinion. Too many conflicting accounts of AE’s death many years earlier on Saipan.

      MC

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