Les Kinney joins “The Truth at Last” conversation, Shreds TIGHAR’s latest false Earhart claims

Most readers of this blog will recall last July’s imbroglio over the History Channel’s bogus claims about the ONI photo found at the NARA Archives by researcher Les Kinney several years ago.  If you don’t recall this or you’re here for the first time, here is my review of the History Channel’s July 9, 2017 abomination: History’s “Amelia Earhart: The Lost Evidence”: Underhanded attack on the Marshalls-Saipan truth.

Clearly, Les Kinney and I have had serious disagreements — and not only about the photo — over important, sensitive issues in the Earhart case.  Thus I was a bit surprised this morning (March 9), to receive an email from Les, asking if I would post his essay addressing TIGHAR’s latest claim on this blog — sort of a “guest column,” so to speak. 

I’m sure Les hasn’t changed his position about the ONI photo, but in this case, I have no problem setting aside our differences and working together against the TIGHAR plague, which has done more damage to the truth in the Earhart case than anyone in the past 30 years.  The degree to which their outrageous and transparently false claims have dominated the corrupt and complaint mainstream media Earhart coverage cannot be overstated, and it’s been a constant irritant for all who pursue the Earhart saga without monetary consideration of any kind. 

More on my personal TIGHAR complaints later.  Now, for those few who aren’t up to speed on the latest mega-media TIGHAR blitz, on March 7, The Washington Post covered the story thusly: Bones discovered on an island are hers, a new analysis shows.”

Without further delay, here’s Les Kinney’s rebuttal of the latest TIGHAR crapola.  All boldface is mine except headlines and subheads.

TIGHAR PRESS RELEASE

New Evidence in the Amelia Earhart Mystery!

Bones Found in South Pacific Likely Amelia Earhart … “This analysis reveals that Earhart is more similar to the Nikumaroro bones than 99% of individuals in a large reference sample.” — Richard L. Jantz, Ph.D.

Nikumaroro, or Gardner Island, is part of the Phoenix Islands, Kiribati, in the western Pacific Ocean. It is a remote, elongated, triangular coral atoll with profuse vegetation and a large central marine lagoon.  It’s approximately 4.7 miles long by 1.6 miles wide and has gained international notoriety as the “most probable” landing place of Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan.  No actual forensic evidence has ever been presented to support this false idea.

Hold on a minute!

For those of you not familiar with TIGHAR, the acronym stands for The International Group for Historical Aircraft Recovery. Its executive director, a fellow named Ric Gillespie founded TIGHAR in 1985. It’s a non-profit organization funded by donors and sponsors. Gillespie has taken a salary to support the ideals of TIGHAR.  Those ideals, according to TIGHAR’s website is the promotion of responsible aviation archaeology and historic preservation.  Don’t let that fool you. TIGHAR devotes 99 percent of its substantial resources hoodwinking the public into believing Amelia Earhart landed at Nikumaroro, a three-mile sliver of land in the Phoenix Island(s) Group.  So that you don’t have to pull out a world atlas, Nikumaroro is close to the equator and smack in the middle of the Pacific Ocean.

On March 8, FOX News, and a fair amount of other media outlets including USA Today splashed a tale taken from a TIGHAR press release.  “It is with 99 per cent certainty, bones found in 1940 on Nikumaroro are that of the famous missing aviator.”

Hogwash!

It all started in April of 1940 when bones, a skull, and bottle were found on Gardner Island (Nikumaroro) by some unknown native colonist.  Near the spot of this find was evidence of a camp site. Natives also found an old sextant box and a sole of a shoe – about an English size 10.  This same hand painted sextant box was described by experts as likely originating from the 1800’s.  It did not appear “under any circumstances have been for a sextant used in modern trans Pacific aviation.”  It was concluded that quite possibly this unknown castaway used the box to keep his possessions.

A little history of Gardner/Nikumaroro is in order, and for good reason.

There is limited information who visited Gardner Island from the 1700s to the early 1900s.  The island was first named in 1825.  So, at least we know of one ship that visited the island when John Quincy Adams was President of the United States.  No doubt the island had been visited many times in the 1800s simply because man’s curiosity gets the best of him.  There is also a possibility, though never confirmed, that Gardner Island had been temporarily settled in the 1890s and abandoned shortly thereafter.

The HMS Norwich City on the reef at Nikumaroro in January 1942, taken by a U.S. Air Force C-47 making a humanitarian airdrops of food to the British colony on Nikumaroro.  Eleven men were killed in 1929 when the freighter ran aground.  Four bodies were buried by survivors after washing ashore. Seven other men were missing and never found.

In November 1929, the British freighter HMS Norwich City departed Melbourne Australia bound for Vancouver, B.C. The 397-foot freighter ran aground on the reef at Gardner Island.  Eleven men were killed.  Four bodies were buried by survivors after washing ashore.  Seven other men were missing and never found.  The rusted and broken hulk of the Norwich City still rests on Nikumaroro’s beach.

In October 1937, a British survey team headed by Harry Maude and Eric Bevington, along with 18 Gilbertese men “thoroughly explored” Gardner Island for several days.

From November 30, 1938, and for the next several weeks, a 16-man New Zealand Survey team explored Gardner Island from an aviation viewpoint.

In December 1938, while the New Zealand team was still on Gardner, at least 80 colonists from the Gilbert and Ellice Islands under British sponsorship settled on the island.  At the time of their arrival, it was noted at least 200 coconut trees existed on the island.  The island also had an abundance of very large coconut crabs resembling King Crabs in size, a pesky rat population, sea turtles, and the inner reef and lagoon swarmed with fish.

On November 5, 1939, crew members from the USS Bushnell, a Navy Survey ship landed at Gardner Island.  The ship discharged 25 sailors and technicians.  The Bushnell crew was intent on constructing a tower on the island.  The Bushnell surveying team noted in its journal, the island was being occupied by 80 settlers. The Bushnell team stayed on the island for two days.

In June of 1944, the U.S. Coast Guard arrived on Gardner island and began construction of a Loran Station. The station was up and running on December 16, 1944 and manned by 25 Coast Guard personnel.  Because of changing technology and the end of the war, the station was deactivated on May 15, 1946. The “Coasties” co-existed with the Gilbertese settlers who finally gave up on the island in 1963.

Don’t you get the idea that lot of people trampled around Gardner for many years?  One Coastie remarked it was boring and all they did in their free time was explore.  Can you imagine the amount of trash on that island?

Henry Evans “Harry” Maude, a former British colonial administrator, head of the Social Development section of the South Pacific Commission, and Professor of Pacific History at the Australian National University.  Maude visited Nikumaroro in October 1937, just 100 days after the fliers disappeared, and saw no trace of Earhart, Noonan or the Electra during several days on the island.

How the Nikumaroro “Bones” got TIGHAR’s attention

In the late 1980s along comes Ric Gillespie and TIGHAR. During Gillespie’s second or third mission to Gardner, having heard a tale from a Coast Guardsman who served on the island in the 1940s, that early colonists buried Earhart’s bones, Ric and his crew began poking and digging around an area TIGHAR has coined the “Seven Site.”  They found human remains alright, but it was of an infant.

While they were figuring out their next move, one of TIGHAR’s explorers found the sole and heel of a shoe nearby.  It was about the size of a 9 or 10 and stamped on the bottom was the famous American trademark, “Cat’s Paw.”

Fast forward a few years.  One of TIGHAR’s Kiwi members was leafing through research material in the Kiribati National Archives in Tarawa.  He noticed a file talking about a skeleton and human remains discovered on Gardner Island in 1940. Gillespie’s team jumped on this information.

The Kiribati archive report documented the finding of Gerald Gallagher, Gardner Island’s colonial administrator. After Gallagher arrived on Gardner in 1940, he was told by native’s human bones had been found on the southeastern part of the island.  The natives also told Gallagher they found a human skull, but it was reburied. Gallagher’s working party searched the area, collected 13 bones and found the skull.  Nearby, they also found an old-fashioned sextant box, part of a sole, possibly from two shoes, and a bottle.  Gallagher’s examined the sole carefully and said it was about an English size 10.  Writing back to Fiji headquarters in Suva, Gallagher said there was a “very slight chance” the bones might be of Amelia Earhart, although to his untrained eye, the bones appeared to be “older than four years.”

Gallagher went on to tell his superiors the area was then searched for rings, money, and keys with no results. His message also explained he examined the skull.  The “dental condition appears to have been good,” he said, “but only five teeth remain.” Gallagher makes no mention of fillings.  He goes on to emphasize that in his opinion, “am quite certain they are not less than four years old and probably much older.”

The bones were eventually shipped to the High Commissioner’s Office in Suva.  An initial report was completed by the Acting Senior Medical Officer.  The medical examiner concluded “they are part of a skeleton of elderly male of Polynesian race, bones having been probably in sheltered position for upwards of 20 years possibly much longer.”

The bones were then brought to the Central Medical School and examined by Dr. D. W. Hoodless.  Hoodless took careful measurements of the bones and skull.  He noted the remains only included one half of the pelvic bone. Hoodless obviously took into consideration the pelvic bone is symmetrical and said that in his professional opinion, the bones were that of a skeleton of “total height of 5 feet 5 and ½ inches approximately.”  Hoodless went on to write “it may be definitely stated that the skeleton is that of a [MALE.”] Hoodless emphasis. Hoodless added, “he was not less than 45 and more probably older.

Gerald Gallagher, February 1937.  Gallagher was 24 years old training as a Cadet in the Fiji and Western Pacific Service.  He had already been assigned to the Gilbert and Ellice Islands Colony and would sail for the Pacific in July. (Photo courtesy Gerard Gallagher.)

Dr. Hoodless again emphasized the bones were male and probably a male of undetermined cultural origins, possibly of mixed descent.  The skull had five teeth and Dr. Hoodless noted the right zygoma and malar bones broken off.

The bones, the bones, where are the bones?

TIGHAR has tried hard to find the bones but they haven’t been seen since 1941.  It hasn’t deterred Gillespie.  Early on, he called on one of his members, the late Dr. Karen Burns, an anthropologist to review the Hoodless findings. Burns had previously traveled to the South Pacific and Gardner courtesy of TIGHAR.

Dr. Burns analysis indicated the Nikumaroro bones could have indeed been Earhart.  But her findings are biased. After all, she was on TIGHAR’s Board of Directors.  It would be like Eli Lily telling the public their new drug was 100 percent effective based upon a study by a pharmacologist who happened to be on Lily’s Board of Directors.

It wasn’t long after Karen Burns issued her findings when an independent study of the Nikumaroro bones was completed by Cross and Wright (2015):  The “Nikumaroro Bones’ are not those of lost aviatrix Amelia Earhart,” stated Pamela J. Cross and Richard Wright. Published in the Journal of Archaeological Science, this new analysis is a welcome redress to the reputation of Dr. D.W. Hoodless (the medical official first responsible for the evaluation of the bones) and raises serious questions for The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR), an Amelia Earhart-focused nonprofit investigatory group and the top proponents of the ‘Gardner Island Theory.’ 

Not one to easily give up, Gillespie tried a different tack.  First though, TIGHAR needed to make the Hoodless calculations a little more palatable.  It’s well known that Earhart was at least 5 feet eight inches tall or taller.  Amelia’s pilot’s license says 5’ 8.”  Dozens of personal recollections and photographs describe and show a tall woman.  Amelia tended to fib.  Maybe she was even taller.  Compared to the known height of many of those she is photographed alongside – there is no doubt Amelia is tall – certainly taller than 5’7″.

Since TIGHAR needed to reduce the measurements necessary to obviate the discrepancies with Dr. Hoodless measurements, TIGHAR now says maybe Earhart was five-seven based upon a driver’s license they found from Massachusetts.  Even at five-seven, it’s a stretch the bones found on Gardner fit the computer analysis done by TIGHAR’s latest anthropologist.  It is difficult to explain how Dr. Jantz’s computer model concluded “with 99 percent certainty” the bones found on Nikumaroro are Amelia’s based upon measurements taken by Dr. Hoodless.

Can Dr. Jantz’s Nikumaroro bones analysis be considered plausible? Highly unlikely.

Dr. Jantz didn’t know all the facts.  First, he hadn’t any bones.  Second, his analysis makes no mention of the skull. To duplicate what he believes are the physical dimensions of Amelia Earhart, Dr. Jantz uses clothing held in the George P. Putnam Collection at Purdue University for comparison.  Noting the inseam length and waist measurement of a pair of trousers worn by Amelia and told to him by a Purdue staffer, Dr, Jantz makes the incredible assumption those measurements would suffice for his scientific analysis.

Dr. Jantz might not have known what TIGHAR had been told years ago.  Amelia Earhart had a painful operation called a Caldwell-Luc procedure done. On June 26, 1935, at Cedars of Lebanon Hospital in Los Angeles, Dr. Joseph Goldstein performed the surgery.  The operation was meant to alleviate a chronic sinus problem plaguing Amelia since 1918 when she was a young nursing assistant in Toronto, Ontario.  Goldstein’s procedure called for drilling a hole in the cavity of Amelia’s mouth going through the bone above the second molar to open the maxillary sinus. It was meant to be a new channel for sinus drainage. (ouch) If the procedure was done on both sides it was called a bi-lateral Caldwell-Luc. According to Muriel Morrissey, Amelia’s sister, Amelia had this procedure done previously on the opposite side. Following the operation in 1935, Amelia was quite sick for a week and in fact developed pleurisy before recovering.

An example of a Caldwell-Luc operation. Could anyone examining a skull fail to note this striking feature?

A forensic examination of a skull having a Caldwell-Luc procedure within the previous five to ten years would have been observed by a five-year-old. TIGHAR fails to explain how Dr. Hoodless, Gallagher, or the Chief Medical Officer failed to see a dime size hole extending from the jaw through the bone into the cranium.  TIGHAR argues maybe the procedure was not apparent because of the missing zygoma and malar bones.  However, the zygoma/malar bones are really one area of the cheek and would not interfere in a forensic analysis of this part of the skull.  One of TIGHAR team members, a medical doctor, admitted that it would be hard pressed for anyone not to have seen evidence of such a procedure.

Not long before her final flight, Amelia bragged to Muriel that she just had a $1000 worth of dental work done. In today’s dollars that’s about $18,900 bucks. I t seems the five teeth examined by Gallagher, the Chief Medical Examiner, and Dr. Hoodless would have shown evidence of some dental work – a filling at least.

Let’s review some of the known Nikumaroro facts.

Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan failed to arrive at Howland Island on their flight from Lae New Guinea on July 2, 1937. TIGHAR believes post loss radio messages from the pair skipped off the ionosphere and originated from Nikumaroro. TIGHAR has tramped to Nikumaroro at least 12 times over the years scouring the island for the missing aviators.

Some of the apocryphal TIGHAR discoveries include: 1) a bone from Earhart’s fingers – which turned out to be from a turtle; 2) a small glass jar that TIGHAR says could have contained freckle cream, and since Earhart had freckles, the jar would be evidence that Earhart was on Nikumaroro.  Never mind the jar was mass-produced for years by a variety of manufacturers, not just for freckle cream; 3) the sole of a size 9 shoe even though it is well documented from two pairs of Amelia’s shoes that still exist that Amelia had small feet and wore a size six and a half; 4) a piece of aluminum shelving that TIGHAR insisted came from the Electra even though it has been determined to be a manufactured piece and standard equipment on WWII era Navy PBY Flying Boats; 5) a piece of aluminum sheathing found on Nikumaroro’s sandy beach by TIGHAR in 1991 that TIGHAR insists came from a metal patch installed over the rear window of Earhart’s Lockheed 10 Electra in Miami, disregarding the fact the aluminum is stamped with war years aluminum markings, and not withstanding how the aluminum piece remained in plain view on the beach after 55 years, while the plane is nowhere to be found; 6) a jackknife found near TIGHAR’s “Seven Site” might have come from Earhart’s plane because a jackknife was listed as being on the Electra’s inventory.  TIGHAR apparently is not aware that most men in the 1930s, 40s, and 50s would have never been without a jackknife in the wilderness.

The Coast Guard’s Loran Unit 92, Gardner Island circa 1944.  Do you suppose this crew might have left some garbage buried on the island during their year and a half stationed there?  And how could anyone from TIGHAR seriously tell us that the garbage they find in Nikumaroro, such as freckle cream jars, came from Amelia Earhart?

But why did they die?

TIGHAR theorizes Earhart and Noonan died very early during their stay on Nikumaroro.  Maybe as little as a week or two after they arrived. Certainly, before October 1937, when the first group of explorers arrived.  Could this have happened?   Quite unlikely.

Coconut water from at least 200 coconut palms was plentiful.  Each coconut can contain as much as six ounces of coconut water.  Fish teamed in the hulk of a freighter washed up on the beach and in the lagoon. Maude, one of the early scientists visiting the island in October 1937, later wrote that you could catch the fish with your hands. Turtles were easy prey and large coconut crabs scampering about everywhere are considered a delicacy by natives. Earhart and Noonan could have survived on Gardner Island indefinitely.

TIGHAR claims it’s possible Earhart and Noonan might not have had the “know how” or stamina to survive as castaways.  That argument seems impossible.  The will to survive is strong and Earhart and Noonan were no slouches. Noonan was worldly and had sailed around the world on nine windjammers.  Hardly the life of a wimp.  Earhart was athletic, had no hesitation to crawl under cars in need of repairs, shot rats in barns, played golf, tennis, rode horses, and earlier in life, played basketball.  In college, she explored the dark catacombs below Columbia and crawled several times to the precarious top of its library dome.  She had no fear.  More importantly, she was an accomplished swimmer.

Didn’t the U.S. Navy look for Earhart and Noonan at Gardner Island? They sure did.

A week after Earhart disappeared, three Vought O3U-3 Corsair float planes from the Battleship USS Colorado flew over Gardner Island for 30 minutes. They roared back and forth, and up and down the length of the island at a leisurely 80 mph. Lieutenant John Lambrecht, the team leader, said they flew at an altitude of 50 to 500 feet. Each plane carried a pilot and observer.  It would have been enough time for the six set of eyes to view the island close-up for at least four passes over the length of this small island.  TIGHAR says the “glare” probably prevented the crew from seeing Earhart and Noonan. Or, TIGHAR surmises, maybe Earhart and Noonan were deep in the jungle.

The battleship USS Colorado joined the search July 7, focusing her search on the Phoenix Islands, 350 miles southeast of Howland. On July 9, three Vought O3U-3 Corsair float planes were launched from the battleship’s three catapult rails to make an aerial inspection of three locations: McKean Island, Gardner Island (now the infamous Nikumaroro), and Carondelet Reef. Nothing unusual was seen during the flyovers of these islands; neither Amelia Earhart nor her Electra were ever on Nikumaroro, contrary to the incessant propaganda efforts by our establishment media.

Guess what, nowhere on the island is the center of the jungle more than 200 yards from the beach – plenty of time for the castaways to break out into the open.

Why would they be deep in the jungle anyway?  (End of Les Kinney commentary.)

Les Kinney’s comprehensive history of Gardner Island-Nikumaroro provides clear perspective on the credibility and veracity of the latest TIGHAR offerings.  Of course, there’s plenty that Les couldn’t get to, and that we can’t cover in one blog post.  Frankly, I purposely did not expend much space in Amelia Earhart: The Truth at Last discussing TIGHAR’s vapid disputations, preferring to cover other threads of far more substance.  I did write a section titled “The Nikumaroro Hypothesis: Recycled Snake Oil,” that dealt with some of the more salient matters, including the fact that the Nikumaroro hypothesis itself is a third-hand version of Fred Hooven’s original McKean-Gardner Island landing theory, presented by Goerner at the 1982 Smithsonian Air and Space Museum Amelia Earhart Symposium.  The theory was soon disavowed by Hooven, once he realized how ridiculous it actually was — and still is. (See pages 300-304 Truth at Last.)  Several revealing posts relating to TIGHAR can easily be found via a simple search of this blog.

Les Kinney’s foregoing presentation was far more civil, cordial and even-keeled than anything I write about these miscreants, but we each have our own style.  On March 9, the Pacific Regional News echoed the latest TIGHAR bombast with its own story, which appeared in the Marianas Variety, Saipan’s major paper and the site of the recent announcement about the planned Earhart Memorial Monument at the Saipan International Airport.  The story,  “Bones found on remote island may belong to Amelia Earhart, study says, is followed by comments, and because the Marianas Variety is a fair and unbiased publication, my comment was allowed to stand:

The claim that Amelia Earhart’s bones were found on Nikumaroro has been long discredited and exposed as fraudulent; this idea is nothing but more hype and fake news from TIGHAR and their media toadies across the mainstream media.  Further, this latest media blitz has surely been coordinated by those in Washington who do not want to see an Earhart memorial on Saipan, and such is their anger that they have activated more than the usual handful of media organizations to spread the latest TIGHAR manure across the land. The timing is too coincidental to be anything else.  This new installment of the “lost bones” lie is nothing more than a thinly veiled response to the recent announcement about the plans to build the Saipan Earhart Memorial Monument.

Weasel words like “could have,” “likely” and “99 percent probability” season the latest recycled TIGHAR trash, but at bottom, it’s nothing but smoke, mirrors and lies, as usual, from TIGHAR and those in the media who aid and abet their phony schemes.  I ask those who believe in real science — not discredited fantasies like “remote viewing” — to study the facts that Earhart researchers have complied for nearly 60 years, and you cannot come to any other conclusion than Amelia and Fred Noonan’s tragic and unnecessary deaths on Saipan.

Murderers are sent to their executions daily on the smallest fraction of the evidence presented in several books since Fred Goerner’s 1966 bestseller “The Search for Amelia Earhart” solidly established the presence and deaths of Earhart and Fred Noonan on Saipan following their loss in July 1937, and inspired thousands of Americans to demand action from Congress to reveal the truth, which was thoroughly ignored. The additional mountain of evidence I present in “Amelia Earhart: The Truth at Last” and in my blog, www.EarhartTruth.com to support the Marshalls and Saipan truth brings together Goerner’s work and that of several other fine researchers and leaves no other conclusion than Saipan. If TIGHAR had the tiniest molecule of this evidence to support their false claims, the Earhart “mystery,” would have been declared “solved” decades ago.

The major problem with the Earhart story is that the American public has been told unceasingly for 80 years that her disappearance is a “great aviation mystery,” to the point that this canard has become part of our cultural furniture, blindly accepted without question by nearly everyone.  In fact, the U.S. government knows exactly what happened to the fliers and simply refuses to admit it. I will not expand on this basic truth here, however, as anyone unafraid to learn the truth can easily find it. Although the truth about the Earhart disappearance is a sacred cow in Washington, it’s also an open secret, available to anyone who desires to find, learn and understand.  (End of Campbell comment.)

In a different situation I would end this post by saying, “We rest our case,” but the fact is that no case has been made by TIGHAR for any of its unceasingly empty and baseless claims.  So at this time, I’ll simply say, “Case closed.”  Until, of course, the next round of mass-media propaganda and lies descends on the unwary.

In closing, again I ask for your kind donations in any amount to the Earhart Memorial on Saipan — a eminently worthy cause that is long overdue.  Please make your check out to: Amelia Earhart Memorial Monument, Inc., and send to AEMMI, c/o Marie S. Castro, P.O. Box 500213, Saipan MP 96950.  Thank you.

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20 responses

  1. Support from an unexpected source, but welcome nevertheless. A scathing indictment of TIGHAR’S continuing deceptions and nonsense- well done, Les. If only reports like this were distributed by the mainstream media, there would be no need of a debate as to the fate of Earhart and Noonan. “The Truth At Last” has been known for years by natives of Saipan and the Pacific, as well as many GI’s and our government.

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  2. I guess when you are being paid, like Gillespie is, you have to keep at it. Even though their findings are easily refutable.
    The evidence accumalated from the Marshall islanders themselves, combined with American marines evidence, to my mind is virtually impossible to refute.

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  3. William H. Trail | Reply

    Mike,

    Les’ essay should be published as a letter to the editor of Mariana Variety as a direct rebuttal of Dr. King’s pseudo-science drivel. And, thank you, Mike for publishing it here. Putting aside personal differences for the sake of advancing a common cause or accomplishing a mission is an admirable quality. It is the mark of a gentleman. Although a common virtue among those who wear and have worn our country’s uniform, selflessness is all too rarely displayed in today’s society. HOOAH!

    All best,

    William

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    1. William,
      Thanks, an excellent idea that I will immediately act upon! The problem may be its length. Will see what the editor says.
      MC

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  4. David Atchason | Reply

    I have noticed lately on my “Google Feed” that appears on my smart phone whenever I click on the Google box there has been a regular frenzy of articles about this bones story. I thought it must be a press release by TIGHAR but no, it’s datelined Chicago Tribune or some other “trustworthy” newspaper. Maybe this is motivated by the news about the Saipan Memorial, that sounds as likely as any other explanation. The larger question is what is the point of all this denial of the truth, if you will? Who gains? I don’t have a clear answer.

    When it comes to the now famous Jaluit picture, I tend to believe both of you. First, I think the picture is genuine, but that’s just an opinion, of course. Second, I think the debunk was prepared long in advance of the show. When it was learned Les found the picture a rebuttal was prepared which was timed to be released a couple weeks after the show when the publicity was still fresh in the public’s mind for maximum impact. That was, the tables were turned to the advantage of the denial people. More or less as Mike says. It didn’t really matter if the picture was real or not. If the picture had remained a minor curiosity only to those interested in AE’s fate there would have been no debunk as nobody would have noticed.

    The AE story and Mike’s contention that her story wasn’t the only deception of WW2 started me on a trail of skepticism about government stories in general. I have arrived at the point where I now consider the strong possibility that the whole war was not the noble cause the American public is led to believe. Since we won the war, we get to decide what the “truth” is. To simplify my thinking, I go to the quote from General Smedley Butler who maintained “War is a Racket.” You might think, well, not WW2 of course. But I say, think again. AE was merely one victim of the racket, among the 50 million or so others who lost their lives. The Roosevelt/Delano crime family was just one of the many racketeers.
    I rest my case.

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  5. I’ve always said that Tighar never brought one thing back from their “vacations” that they did not take with them to “find?” I have talked to Ric Gillepsie several times on the phone, I find him arrogant, easily angered, not scientific when I would suggest anything that went against his dogmatic beliefs. He even knows he’s wrong, but why come clean when it would upset his cushy way of life. He reminds me of the little kid who took his ball and bat and went home. He refuses to accept my attempts to contact him

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  6. Many thanks to Mike Campbell for this work and the many interesting facts he gives here. I had missed the recent Washington Post story. I followed the link given by Mike and saw it. I noticed it had 315 comments–the large majority were negative–people just didn’t buy the story about the bones. Shows you at least some people are not brain dead. Personally, I stopped reading the Post years ago as I find it to be useless for finding real news. The fact that the richest man in the world, Amazon’s Jeff Bezos, bought it, should have been a good thing, but it wasn’t. If Jeff really cared about the truth, he would never allow such stuff be printed in his newspaper. But it looks like Jeff is part of the problem.

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  7. The media is desperate for news these days, especially a mystery. Rehashing Ricks worn out “theory” about Nikumaroro and then actually spending money producing a show around a bogus photo proven to have been taken much earlier, just tells us that those of us who really care about finding “the truth at last” need to make a coordinated effort to find forensic evidence to solve this mystery once and for all. It is indeed the greatest mystery of the 20th century.

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    1. No George, it’s not a mystery, it’s an 80-year-cover-up, as I’ve been saying and writing for at least 20 years. People like you who continue to insist that it’s a “mystery” are not helping the good cause at all. You have also personally and strongly suggested to me that the Earhart plane “could be” on the bottom of the Pacific, which is just an earlier lie than the current Nikumaroro falsehood, which despite the recent media barrage, is really on its last legs. At least I hope we’re witnessing its death throes, as 30 years is quite long enough for such a ridiculous theory to thrive, and it’s done so only because the chief monkeys in the Washington establishment have willed it. Please don’t send us anything else that alludes to the “Earhart mystery,” as I’m not going to be a party to promoting more Earhart myths.
      MC

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  8. Ric Gillespie will continue the deception, for as long as it takes; catching the gullible & naive by the net fulls. As usual, the major networks clamored for this attention, discrediting all professional research & journalism. How LOW will this media stoop, in DISGRACING, DEFACING and DISRESPECTING the 1st Woman of Aviation/Amelia Earhart?
    *Applause and the most *RESPECT to *Mike Campbell & *Les Kinney, TITANS of the *TRUTH, who’s pens are mightier than the sword!

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  9. Vernon Prescott | Reply

    Mike: Me thinks Gillespie wants to end the Earhart disappearance as “Mystery Solved / Case Closed”, and commence to fleece the innocent with his “Let’s Find Glenn Miller” game. Thanks so much for posting Les Kinney’s request to you. You are a true gentleman !

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    1. Thanks Vernon. I think so too! It matters not who gets the credit in this, but that this worthy cause is advanced. Despite appearances, Gillespie and his minions know that their scam is running dry, and so their media allies are going crazy trying to resurrect the old, long debunked ideas, like these ridiculous bones. It’s truly pathetic, and only reveals how much the Truth is hated by the establishment. This has always been a war, one that although we probably won’t win in our lifetimes, eventually will be decided in favor of the truth, whether it be down here, or on the other side when all is settled once and forever.

      MC

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  10. Dear Mike: Thank you for including Les Kinney’s article in your blog. Its a fine rebuttal to TIGHARS withering claims. The bones article splash seemed to be everywhere, and indeed it is articles like this, that let all the wind out of TIGHAR’S hole filled sails. Sincerely, Rob Ellos

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  11. That Caldell-Luc procedure looks downright mediaeval. One could question Amelia’s state of mind and physical health having that and a lot of dental work done not long before the flight. It’s understandable now why Fred Goerner didn’t work that hard to find Amelia’s dental records.

    As a technical point, Fred Noonan would most likely have used a bubble octant as his primary instrument on the flight. The bubble octant was specifically designed for aerial celestial navigation and was first used beginning around 1930. When Fred worked for Pan Am he was known for also carrying a sextant. Due to the space and weight constraints on the world flight he would probably not have had both. Fred left home to go to sea at a young age, sailed ’round Cape Horn three times under sail and survived the sinking of three ships by torpedoes during WWI. Seems like Fred deserves his own movie. He certainly would have seemed out of place amongst our contemporary snowflakes.

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  12. I’m just coming up to speed on all this including the disputes but as a lifetime pilot the more I learn the more I respect this woman. Her bravery be it a male or female is so inspiring to us all but especially females of which I have three daughters. I just sent my contribution to the Saipan memorial fund as the least I can do to honor this woman and inspire all the people who go through that airport; I encourage all others to consider this honor too as it is above all other considerations that in the end will only fade with time but not her spirit and example………………

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks John, well said. I pray that many more will echo your sentiments.
      MC

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  13. TIGHAR’S CLAIMS…… one word…..

    Sickening……

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  14. […] last time we heard from Kinney was his March 9 dismantling of the aforementioned TIGHAR-Richard Jantz-bones fantasies.  Although we still differ over his […]

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  15. Convincing until the end when you basically say the truth is out there but say nothing further or provide any guidelines…..then you ask for money, just like Tighar!! Not convinced by any of you!

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    1. To compare the truth with TIGHAR’s propaganda tells me that you could not have read Truth at Last, nor the fine books by Fred Goerner, Thomas Devine, Vincent V. Loomis or Oliver Knaggs. You are simply reciting nonsense that you hear from others who know nothing because they’re too lazy and unmotivated to learn the truth. I ask for money for the monument on Saipan to Amelia Earhart, Dee, not to line my own pockets. Do you discern the vast difference, or can’t you see that far past your nose?

      Buy and read Truth at Last. If you find it lacking in any way, I will personally send you a check for the entire cost. Extend yourself past the conventional “wisdom” and false narrative, and you will be surprised what you will learn.

      MC

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