Game’s response leaves key question unanswered

Today we present Ross Game’s reply to Rollin Reineck’s October 1998 letter, in which the retired Air Force colonel and noted Earhart researcher asked him if he could shed any light on Fred Goerner inexplicably dropping his well-known conviction that Amelia Earhart had landed at Mili Atoll on July 2, 1937, a belief that has long been supported by a variety of witnesses.

As was Reineck’s letter in our previous post, this one appeared in the February 1999 edition of Bill Prymak’s Amelia Earhart Society Newsletters (Boldface and italic emphases mine throughout.)

Ross P. Game
Post Office Box 176
Napa, CA 94559-0176

Telephone (707) 255-4693

October 27, 1998

Dear Colonel Reineck,

I received your letter of October 24 and I hope in the next day or two, health permitting, to contact Bob Ross to arrange a meeting in the near future.

Up to the time of his death I didn’t ever get the impression from Fred Goerner that he had any doubts about the Earhart plane coming down in the MarshallsIt was known, beyond doubt, that Amelia and Fred Noonan were brought to Saipan by the Japanese.  We found evidence (obtained in interviews with natives — recalling the white woman and white man when they were children) on Saipan and in the Marshalls and had fantastic assistance in that phase of the investigation from Catholic missionary-priests able to speak the native languages.

Joe Gervais, left, and Rolling Reineck, circa mid-1990s, overlooking Honolulu, Hawaii.  Still esteemed by some as the greatest of Earhart researchers, Gervais can count among his contributions the vile and false Irene Bolam-as-Amelia Earhart theory, which his friend Reineck unsuccessfully tried to reprise in his 2003 book, Amelia Earhart Survived.

Jose Quintanilla, trained at the FBI Academy and head of the police on Guam, took a leave of absence to assist us.  He came up with evidence identical with what we had obtained from natives of the islands.

Without exception those who recalled the “white people” were able to pick Amelia’s photo from a series of pictures spread out on the ground.  When she first was brought to Saipan in 1937 she was indeed a novelty because Earhart and Noonan were the first Caucasians they’d ever seen and the woman was wearing a coat which was most unusual to the natives (her leather jacket) and had hair cut like a man.

In Washington files we learned that George Palmer Putnam was secretly brought to the Saipan gravesite after the island had been captured by U.S. Marines and the remains “secretly” removed under the direction of an intelligence officer (we even obtained his name, thanks to the CIA).

Let’s keep in touch.

Regards,

Ross Game

Undated photo of Ross Game, likely taken fairly soon before his death at age 80 in 2009 of Lou Gehrig’s disease, or ALS.

Clearly the most notable aspect of Game’s letter is that he fails to answer Reineck’s question — and mine as well — about what might have caused Goerner to change his mind about where he believed Amelia Earhart landed her Electra on July 2, 1937To this day, no substantial, or perhaps more accurately stated, acceptable reason, has surfaced to explain why Goerner decided to unceremoniously dump his formerly rock-solid belief that Amelia landed her Electra at Mili Atoll

By 1998, when Rollin Reineck contacted him, Game was obviously far removed from his former role as a confidant to Goerner.   In my inch-thick file of correspondence between Game and Goerner, the last letter, from Game to Goerner, was sent in August 1992.  In none of the material does Goerner inform Game of his remarkable rejection of his original Mili belief, so succinctly stated in the close of The Search for Amelia Earhart

Precisely when Goerner changed his mind isn’t known, but it could have been as early as 1970, when in an April 17 letter to Fred Hooven, he discussed his plans to search the area southeast of Howland and Baker Islands, and northeast of McKean Island in the Phoenix group for “a reef and sandbar which have been most recently reported in 1945 and 1954, but have never been landed upon or investigated at a distance closer than two miles.”

Game’s response to Reineck certainly leaves no doubt that he was unaware of Goerner’s change, which we can find emphatically spelled out in Goerner’s stunning April 1993 letter to J. Gordon Vaeth, in which he flatly announced, “I now can state without equivocation that I DO NOT BELIEVE THE AE ELECTRA LANDED AT MILI.”  (Emphasis Goerner’s.)

For much more on this, please see Chapter VII, “Goerner’s Reversal and Devine’s Dissent,” pages 172-176 of Truth at Last.

I have nothing that indicates Reineck and Game ever kept in touch, after this letter from Game, though it’s entirely possible, and have no evidence that Game and Bob Ross ever got together for a meeting.  Bill Prymak’s AES Newsletters, although full of information unavailable anywhere else, are far from exhaustive. 

For more on G.P. Putnam’s visit to Saipan, please see pages 239-241 in Truth at Last.

27 responses

  1. Bizarre is the only adjective I can attribute to this reversal. Why in the world would Goerner have rejected all of the evidence that he previously gathered? I wonder if he received some as yet unknown correspondence from another researcher that changed his mind. Does not seem likely, but what other explanation is there?

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  2. William H. Trail | Reply

    Greetings to All:

    Fred Goerner’s reversal defies all reason and logic, but it doesn’t change the evidence. It does not alter the truth. At best it is an annoyance.

    All best,

    William

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  3. This time I reread the pertinent section in TTAL about this reversal. Keeping in mind the very curious circumstances of Devine’s visit to Medford, Ma and the clumsy and sinister tail the “ONI” ??? put on him.

    I wouldn’t be surprised if some tipster had given Goerner some very sensitive information that he pondered revealing but the so-called national security issue made him pause. Then The Men in Black came to his door and set him straight. Desiring to ensure his family’s well being he did the “right thing” at the very end. That being “crashed and sank.” Now we can all sleep well at night.

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    1. David,

      I thought you might have been onto something until your last sentence. Goerner NEVER renounced his strong conviction that the fliers were taken to Saipan and died there. He changed his position on their landing spot, and that was the extent of his change.

      Last night the real Men in Black were briefly discussed on a History Channel program, and they are a real and oft-repeated phenemoenon. These characters, whoever they are and for whoever they work, have in fact terrified and intimidated UFO witnesses into silence, over and over again. They remain cloaked in real mystery.

      Mike

      Like

  4. Mike,

    I was using “Men in Black” in a figurative manner. You say he never renounced his belief in prisoners on Saipan, but after his reversal how did he account for their arrival on Saipan? Did he ever say? Without going back to TTAL, wasn’t Goerner saying they must have landed on the reef and then somehow got captured by the Japanese? From what Prymak said about his meeting with the local Marshallese businessman it was well known in the Marshalls that AE landed there. Why would Goerner take the word of a Peace Corps guy over several other eyewitnesses?

    If he merely changed his Mili Atoll theory and the rest of his story remains the same wouldn’t it be irrelevant? Does the government prefer that it appears much more plausible that she was LOST if she is said to have not landed on a Marshallese Island? It would appear odd if she sighted land and ditched the plane there she wouldn’t report that on her radio, but if she just dropped into the ocean she might not call for help? I don’t know where I am going with this, but I still feel Goerner was pressured into reversing.

    Dave

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    1. David,

      Goerner thought they were picked up by the Japs, regardless of where they landed. On his last recording, which will be posted soon, Goerner stated: “There’s a lot of information to indicate that Earhart and Noonan may have been picked up by a Japanese vessel and taken into Japanese territory.” See pages 175-176 Truth at Last again.

      The Peace Corps worker, Eric Sussman, was a very young, untrained investigator who probably put off the Marshallese he asked about the fliers. He didn’t seem very smart when he contacted me several years ago, and still thinks the fliers were never in the Marshalls. See pages 173-174 TAL. For Goerner to attribute his change partly to Sussman’s reports is incomprehensible, yet there it is.

      No evidence has ever surfaced that Goerner was pressured into changing his position. If that were the case, he would have made far more noise noise to please his masters than he did, and would have loudly denounced Saipan, which he never did.

      See the close of my Oct. 19, 2016 post, “Goerner’s ‘In Search of Amelia Earhart’ Conclusion” https://earharttruth.wordpress.com/2016/10/19/goerners-in-search-of-amelia-earhart-conclusion for more on Goerner and his conviction on Saipan.

      Mike

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      1. Eric Sussman is alive and well and hasn’t changed his views from the 1960’s when he was first contacted by Fred Goerner. At that time, Sussman was a young Peace Corps volunteer assigned to Enajet about 15 miles east of Mili Mili. Sussman never indicates in his response letters to Goerner that he had traveled to Mili Mili to conduct interviews.

        In a recent interview, Sussman said he visited Mili Mili, but it’s likely his interviews were limited to a few “old” people at Enajet and its doubtful he would have gotten permission to travel to Mili Mili to conduct interviews. If he had, he certainly would have been introduced to Queen Boskit long before she was interviewed by Loomis and Knaggs. Even today, travel between Enajet and Mili Mili is difficult. Sussman doesn’t mention to Goerner there was a Peace Corps volunteer assigned to Mili Mili. A couple of years ago, I was able to track down that Mili Mili Peace Corps volunteer who scoffed at the idea of an Earhart and Noonan crash landing at Mili Atoll in 1937 even though he had no previous knowledge of that rumor. He told me that I was uninformed and had no idea what it was like at Mili Atoll. When I told him I had been there several times, he cooled down a bit but offered no rationale for his views.

        Unfortunately, Goerner accepted Sussman’s amateurish opinion. But Goerner needed to accept Sussman’s argument because of his own ego. The San Francisco journalist was in competition with Vincent Loomis, Buddy Brennan, and Oliver Knaggs all of whom offered compelling witness testimony and evidence that Earhart and Noonan had gone down at Mili Atoll.

        I know Mike doesn’t want to hear this, but Goerner did everything he could to discredit his fellow researchers. Goerner had traveled to the Marshall Islands but only to Majuro. He never went to the three atolls most likely to give him answers: Jaluit, Mili, and Kwajalein. Goerner said he was denied entry to Kwajalein but I have never found government correspondence denying him entry. By the mid 1960’s, Kwajalein was administered by civilians and home to hundreds of civilian workers and their families. The government routinely placed help wanted ads in various U.S. newspapers for construction workers, medical technicians, and even allowed USO tours. Its highly doubtful Goerner would have been denied entry if he had persisted. It’s too bad because with his notoriety, he would have most certainly met Ted Burris, Frank Serafini, and been introduced to Mera Phillips. That meant his interview with W.B. Jackson would have taken on new significance. That meant he would have been on the trail of this ONI operative Serafini claimed to have met.

        So, Goerner used the Sussman letters to convince others there was no reason to believe the accounts of Loomis, Knaggs, and Brennan.

        In 1989 Goerner wrote, “Mr. Sussman spent nearly two years at Mili as a Peace Corps volunteer, and he interviewed every Marshallese there that was old enough to remember anything about the pre-WWII years, especially 1937. (Not true Sussman interviewed a handful of old people) A story existed about a woman pilot being picked up somewhere in or about the Marshalls in 1937, but Mr. Sussman satisfied himself and consequently satisfied me that MILI HAD NOT BEEN the landing place of the Earhart plane. It is more than a little surprising that Vincent Loomis, Oliver Knaggs, Buddy Brennan, Paul Bryce, Jim Slade, and all the other people who visited Mili in the late 1970’s and the early 1980’s and made such extravagant and unsupported claims, did not even attempt to contact me before they made their ‘expeditions.’ It’s almost if they did not want to hear ANYTHING which did not support their conclusions and what they were trying to promulgate to their investors. What was amusing but not surprising was that they were calling each other names and threating law suits against one another within months after their return to the United States.”

        Sadly, it was mostly Goerner who attempted to disparage the research of Loomis, Knaggs, and especially the fine work done by Don Kothera and the Cleveland Group. Goerner’s files are ripe with insulting and demeaning letters to newspapers and attorney’s discrediting the research of anyone not named Fred Goerner.

        As a last note, Sussman still follows the latest twists and turns relating to the Earhart disappearance and probably reads this blog. Not surprisingly, Mr. Sussman still clings to the belief Earhart was never on Mili Atoll.

        Les Kinney

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      2. Thanks Les, this helps to explain Goerner’s “inexplicable” reversal of opinion. It’s hard to believe that he could actually ignore all the Mili evidence so that he could try to discredit his fellow researchers, as you say, but this is the only explanation that really makes any sense. It might also explain why be bought the lies of Gen. Wallace Greene, when he denied having any knowledge of the Earhart plane on Saipan. It would have given Devine credit for his work, and clearly Goerner didn’t want to do that.

        I’m afraid this “greatest of Earhart researchers,” at bottom, was not a man of any real integrity, and wanted to “own” the Earhart story at any cost — even forsaking basic honesty and integrity in his work. No, I don’t like to hear it, but the truth is far more important than anyone’s individual feelings or ego.

        His son, Lance, has also told me some things about Fred that I was glad I didn’t know when I was working on Truth at Last. The intimate personal details that Lance shared with me will stay that way, but they do support what you’re saying about Goerner’s professional ethics — or lack of same — in his work.

        Thanks again for your valued contribution.

        Mike

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  5. Stuart R. Brownstein | Reply

    Keep it up, Mike !

    Like

  6. Last night I attempted to find in TTAL the pertinent information about how the Mili Landing scenario came to be. I was out hiking in the mountains Thursday and Friday and was just too tired last night to do much research. There is still the shadow of a doubt in my mind that the Mili landing story is 100% guaranteed true. Goerner may have received some still secret info which indicated a different more audacious scenario and he was not free to disclose what it was. I tend to think he came to know a lot more than he let on and was at times counseled to not mention certain things. In other words, there are TRUTHS which many people know that cannot be SAID. Especially in politics and war.

    So I was going to ask whatever became of Sussman? Where is he now? He is painted as some kind of bumbling Peace Corps idealistic dweeb. What if he weren’t? Can anybody tell me off the top of their head what the Peace Corps was doing on Mili? No looking it up, keep your books closed. Maybe the answer is common knowledge and I am making myself look foolish again. OK raise your hands.

    Dave

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  7. Mike,

    My latest reply seems to have disappeared for now. I hope it is published. In my opinion of what Goerner could relate, I thought of a better word, he may have been “cautioned” not to say certain things he knew.
    As I clicked on more links, I came to the San Mateo Times article “I Saw AE Crash on Saipan.” I can’t seem to expand it into readable form, perhaps you could print it out in plain text so I/we could read it all?

    Also, I was curious about Josephine’s surname, Akiyama. It sounds very Japanese to me. Was she a Japanese immigrant or was that her married name or what? Not that it would make any difference, I don’t think.

    Dave

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    1. Dave,

      Re your first comment and question, about Goerner knowing more than he let on and Sussman’s whereabouts: No way Goerner was holding anything secret from the public, in my opinion anyway. He wanted to search the reefs southwest of Howland and the Air Force, which initially offered to help, later backed out, saying they couldn’t waste their manpower that way. It’s in TAL. On top of that, the reefs were never shown to actually exist. The Electra was on Saipan, not on nonexistent reefs in the Pacific.

      I can’t find Sussman’s email right now, but if I do, will send it to you privately so that you can satisfy your curiousity about anything he might be holding onto. I can assure you, but you won’t accept it, that he has nothing substantial to offer besides what he told Goerner in his letters to him, which are decidedly unsubstantial.

      Josephine was Josephine Blanco before she marred Maximo Akiyama and added the Japanese surname. This also is well known, David, not a hidden secret.

      Mike

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  8. I just wrote a long opinionated piece and my computer was unplugged and shut off. I hope to be able to retrieve it. If I do you are the moderator you can decide whether to use it or not, of course. It was probably annoying. My question about what the Peace Corps was doing on Mili does have some validity, I don’t know if you know.

    Dave

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  9. I no longer think Goerner was holding anything back, quite the contrary. I do believe his reversal was because he had learned the truth and wanted to reveal it before he died. Whatever problems this revelation would cause him no longer mattered.

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    1. What else can I say, David? You are clearly very confused about the whole matter. I’ve done my best to answer your questions, but you are determined to take a ridiculous position. I still like you and appreciate your interest and support!

      Everything I received from you today has been posted.

      Mike

      Like

  10. Christopher Roman | Reply

    Rollin Reineck was right! without a doubt. Read his book and that is what happened.!

    ________________________________

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  11. According to what I read last night the Peace Corps was on Mili to help with removing all the unexploded ammunition. I’m sure they were only assisting but it never occurred to me they would be doing something like that. That’s why I give some credence to Sussman whatever it was he thought. He was doing something the natives must have appreciated, I doubt he was alienating them.. He just might have heard something from the locals that they wouldn’t tell Goerner. That’s all I’m getting at.

    Despite all the claimed eyewitness reports putting Amlia and Fred on Mili or at least Jaluit, I think we should at least consider the implications of that not actually being true.

    First, I don’t think they were lost. But even if they were, and were near Howland and couldn’t find it how on earth would they wind up on Mili which is a long way off and not even in the direction of the Gilberts which is supposedly where they would go in case they were completely lost.

    I doubt they would ever purposely fly to the Marshalls because there was simply nothing there at the time worth seeing for the high risk they would assume. If they did crash or land on Mili, what plausible reason would the Japs have to transport her plane to Saipan, I could never think of one. If they wanted to make an international incident out of it, why move it? They wouldn’t.

    Was there advanced technology the Japs had to examine? I never heard of anything like that, what could it possibly have been? Did they need to take it to Saipan for repairs to make it airworthy again? They probably had repair facilities there, but seriously, what’s the point? What possible use could it be put to?

    FYI I read that in addition to lots of Zeros there is, in shallow water at Mili, a B25 which closely resembles the Electra. There are to me even more details of the Mili story that just don’t add up. Instead of racking my brain to somehow make the Mili story fit, if AE wasn’t there then all these issues are solved in one fell swoop. Now for all us conspiracy theorists who reject the crashed and sank story, the Mili landing offers us a plausible, intuitive, simple conspiracy theory for us to mull over. It also may be just wrong. If it’s wrong then we have what is called a red herring. We reject crashed and sank for obvious reasons but then we are sent into the quagmire of Kamois and Koshus and Akagis and Fijians and piers which may or may not have existed and AE and Fred doubles . Our heads are spinning which is the hidden purpose.

    So I now believe that Goerner was not coerced into rejecting the Mili scenario. As Mike says, he was intent on telling the truth as he saw it. That’s why he proclaimed the Mili landing never happened because he had somehow learned the truth and as he was nearing death he had nothing to lose by taking his perplexing stand. This is what’s called the Atchason reversal.
    I rest my case.

    Dave

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    1. Dave,
      To answer your question about why the Japs would take the Earhart plane to Saipan, I would counter that by asking why they would not. Saipan was the closest Jap facility that could repair the plane, and then, after they won the war, they would have a splendid trophy to show off and rub the Americans’ faces in the fact that they had murdered their prized aviatrix four years before the war officially started. This kind of behavior would have been perfectly in keeping with the barbaric, militaristic Japanese faction at that time.

      MIke

      Like

      1. Mike, I believe you’re response to Dave is 100 percent correct.

        Les Kinney

        Like

    2. William H. Trail | Reply

      David,

      Please cite your source(s) regarding “lots of Zeros” at Mili. Pacific Wrecks.com lists only the following aircraft wrecks for that locale:

      P-39Q Airacobra 42-19469
      Pilot Empey crashed January 16, 1944 crashed two to three miles west of Mili Island

      B-25D Mitchell 41-30613
      Pilot Johnston Shot down January 19, 1944 crashed to the east of Mili Island, wreckage known

      SBD-5 Dauntless 36540
      Pilot Sparrow MIA March 18, 1944

      If you have another, more expansive source for wreck data than Pacific Wrecks please let me know. Thanks!

      All best,

      William

      Like

  12. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mili_Atoll
    It doesn’t say there are lots of Zeros, but there must be a few. Evrything I said yesterday comes from Wikipedia, I know it can be not completely reliable. Also from Wikipedia is where i Got the info that the Peace Corps was there to clean up old ordnance which struck me as surprising, I had no idea they did that sort of thing. I’m not sure if they did the whole atoll or just Mili Island. If they did the whole atoll, and I suspect they did, it means Sussman must have learned a lot even if he is not articulate.

    I always pictured Barre I. as undisturbed from the time of AE’s suspected landing there until Loomis and Spink came along. This may be far from the truth as the Peace Corps could have picked up scrap metal and taken it away, never suspecting they might have pieces of the AE plane. Or those guys might say they saw nothing on Barre except driftwood.. Or they might have removed the “buried box” and thrown it in the trash. To claim Sussman might have been messing with Goerner’s mind ,I don’t know, did he talk to Sussman after the book came out? It might be worth talking to the guy and/or some of his group.

    I certainly wasn’t claiming that the Mili Landing scenario is a myth, I have no way of knowing that. I just meant consider what it would mean or imply if it was a myth. Apparently Goerner came to believe it was, I don’t know if he ever elaborated on his reasoning for that. We would not have to figure out what she was doing on Mili if she was never there.

    What I have up my sleeve is the question, Did AE fly to and crash/land on Saipan and that is why her plane wound up there? THat is why I was hoping to find a readable version of the newspaper article about Josephine Akiyama and also some other stories about a plane/seaplane landing/crashing in Tanapag Harbor. I can try rereading first TTAL looking for my answers. I also was curious about the story of a plane being taken to another island and bulldozwd over. Part of the trouble is I read things on this blog and later I want to go back to them and I just don’t know which story or which link my item came from. Sometimes I can’y find my reference. Sometimes I am apprehensive that the US government started putting out disinformation and misinformation from Day One of her disappearance and some of it has been adopted as the truth. I always have the attitude that any particular detail of her story could be inaccurate or just plain false. THis definitely applies to any MSM story. I first learned this lesson from Mike and the AE story.

    So my source is Wikipedia which I think I gave you the link. Pacific Wrecks does not have general info like Wikipedia. Again, I know they are not always accurate.
    All Best,

    Dave

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  13. There are a couple of questions I would have asked Fred regarding AE/FN going down in the Phoenix Islands:

    – If they were found by a Japanese fishing boat on a reef in that area, what reasoning or possible justification would they have for taking AE/FN to Saipan as “prisoners” when they were just “minding their own business” and no where near the mandated area?

    – A fishing boat would not be able to transport the Electra to Saipan; how would a large Japanese ship sneak in there and remove it in the midst of the Navy search for AE (another flaw in Fred Hooven’s original Gardner Island scenario)? Fred was certainly aware of Devine finding the Electra at Aslito Field.

    It’s also strange that Fred would change his mind knowing of his respect and admiration for Admiral Nimitz and his statement to him.

    Like

    1. Very goods points, Tom. I wish I had thought of your point about the Japanese intruding into an area that was being searched by the U.S. Navy. Re Devine and his claim of seeing the Electra, which of course I believe because it was supported by others, Goerner had little regard for Devine and likely never really believed it.

      Mike

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  14. So what did Fred wind up believing? My take is that he concluded that she didn’t land in the Marshalls, the plane was not on Saipan and he thought it was still in the area of Howland, perhaps on a reef that came and went? My problem with the plane at Aslito Field is why wasn’t it a general rumor among the Marines stationed there? I would think if a few saw it the word would have spread rapidly and yet it apparently didn’t. Only a select few noted it, and I don’t see why it would be regarded as a secret. But I wasn’t there. And apparently the story goes that Devine wrote down the info (What? the NR16020?) and then the paper was stolen. His story does get a little hard to follow. What if he wrote down some other number?

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    1. Many knew about the plane at Aslito, and its sighting was well known among a significant number of troops. This is not arguable. More on Goerner’s final beliefs will be forthcoming in my next post.

      Mike

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  15. Having just read Les Kinney’s account I came up with a few questions. I’m sure I read on Wikipedia that the Peace Corps volunteers went around at least Mili Island cleaning up old unexploded ammunition which sounds bizarre or unlikely. Is that really what they were doing? Why would Sussman go around asking old natives about AE? How did he get interested in the subject? If he was there before Goerner wrote his book how would he know that AE landed on Mili Atoll? Why would he have the slightest interest in disproving the Mili Atoll landing scenario?

    What was it about AE’s flight and crash in Japanese territory that they kept quiet about it even to this day? Did they keep quiet about the Fijian shipwreck at the time?

    Like

    1. David,
      The Peace Corps volunteers at that time (1960’s) were usually from 18 to 22 years of age and fresh out of high school or a recent college graduate. You are correct, it would be bizarre and not only unlikely but absurd to believe they would have been tasked to pick up unexploded ammunition. did they come across unexploded ammunition and ordinance? Of course. The Wikipedia article from which you refer originated from a short 2014 AP article without sourcing. However, it probably is attributed to a statement from Rachel Boyce, “a volunteer teacher from Utah,” according to the article.

      Ok, let’s just show how misinformation, legends, and rumors’ develop and quickly turn into fact. In this case the Wikipedia article and the sourcing comes from an article by Sakoda, Charlene, “Island in the Pacific is home to countless WWII relics.” yahoo.com, March 20, 2014. Retrieved: September 12, 2017. The article was originally carried by AP.

      If you read the entire article, you would assume Rachel Boyce was probably a Peace Corps volunteer at Mili sometime in the 1960’s and had direct evidence/knowledge of Peace Corps volunteers tasked to pick up unexploded ammunition.

      Well, it turns out Rachel Boyce taught English at Mili Atoll from July 2013 to June of 2014 for a program sponsored by the Marshall Islands Ministry of Education. (It’s highly likely Boyce was at Mili Atoll as part of her mission for the Church of Latter Day Saints – but I am only speculating to this fact. When I was at Mili Atoll in 2017 and 2018, there were young LDS people at Mili Atoll there as part of their mission.)

      As Mike will tell you, half the stuff written about the disappearance Amelia Earhart is pure bologna. I am guessing half of my research is attempting to validate source material. This little Peace Corps sub story is an example of how things become misconstrued.

      FYI, Goerner asked Dirk Ballandorf, Deputy for Peace Corps activities at Guam who had oversight over Peace Corps activities in the Marshall Islands if there was a Peace Corps volunteer at Mili Atoll who could help him with interviewing “people.” Ballandorf supplied Sussman’s contact information. Goerner’s first letter exchange with Sussman began on May 1, 1969, three years after Search for Amelia Earhart was published.

      Les Kinney

      Like

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