G.P. Putnam’s bizarre search for Amelia, Part II

We continue with our visit to the strange and desperate times of George P. Putnam, as he futilely searched for his missing wife, Amelia Earhart, in the years immediately following her disappearance on July 2, 1937.  This article appeared in the November 1994 issue of the Amelia Earhart Society Newsletters, and outside of my boldface emphasis and inserted photos, it is a near exact representation of the stories that appeared in the December 1939 and January 1940 editions of Popular Aviation magazine.

“IS AMELIA EARHART STILL ALIVE?” (Part II of three)
By Dean S. Jennings

A woman in Detroit sent a series of unique sketches which she called human radio wave pictures,depicting Amelia Earhart dragging Capt. Noonan ashore on a barren island.  The woman, an architect with two university degrees, said she was impelled to draw the pictures by a power she could not explain.  At the same time another correspondent airmailed a crude pencil sketch which she said was drawn by “the eye of science” moving her fingers.  It showed Miss Earhart sprawled face down on a beach, dead.

The messages came from every, state, from Mexico, Canada, Great Britain and a dozen other countries.  A clairvoyant in Miami “saw” Miss Earhart in a native village at Samoa and asked a reward for her information.  Five prominent citizens of Denver “talked” to Miss Earhart in a séance and learned that she and Capt. Noonan had been forced down on a volcanic island and were asphyxiated by sulfur fumes.  A seer in Boston forwarded a 5,000-word transcript of her astral conversations with the lost flyers.

From an engineer in New Mexico came an incredible account of a dream in which, he saw rescue boats approach the wrecked Electra.  He quoted Miss Earhart:

We felt no uneasiness, thinking we were among friends.  But when our plane touched water, we were shot in the back of the head.   Our plane and bodies were rifled of all valuables and the inhuman monsters sank the plane with our bodies.

This headline in the U.K’s Globe and Mail is typical of the treatment the Earhart disappearance sparked in thousands of newspapers around the world in early July 1937.

The writer offered an explanation for the crime, saying: This dream was so starkly clear I felt it my duty’ to tell you.  When one considers the pirating done in the past and today with automobiles, trains and ships, it seems entirely reasonable . . .

A retired Los Angeles businessman forwarded a diary of his spirit talks with Miss Earhart, and a detailed map of an island he had seen in his visions.  He had drawn it in the dark of night, but was never able to give an exact location.

In looking back through the bright pages of Amelia Earhart’s adventurous life, George Putnam remembered something that might have explained the curious fervor of all those men and women who wanted to help in his hour of despair.  It was simply that Amelia Earhart herself had a fragile psychic quality, some strange susceptibility to conditions beyond understanding.  She rarely mentioned it to friends, never discussed it publicly.  But whenever AE participated in mental telepathy or other psychic experiments to further her curiosity, observers were astonished at results. And yet she never invoked or followed the advice of countless clairvoyants and astrologers who besieged her at every stage of her great flights.

She used to say, laughing gaily: “I haven’t the courage to tell people my plans in advance.  A pilot shouldn’t worry: if I listened to every prediction, I’d probably never leave the ground.”

It is not generally known that forecasters predicted accidents on two of Amelia’s successful ocean flights — or that several astrologers begged her not to fly on March 20th in 1937, the day her plane was smashed on a take-off from Honolulu.

Despite his willingness and feverish anxiety to leave nothing to chance, George Putnam found little or nothing tangible in the first rush of letters from eager writers.  He was ready to be shown, but there was heartbreaking confusion and disparity in every batch of mail.  Late in July, however, occurred the first of several remarkable events.  That morning Mr. Putnam received the following telegram from Hamilton, Ontario:

AMELIA EARHART ALIVE ON CORAL SHOAL ON ONE OF GILBERT ISLANDS LATITUDE 2 ABOVE EQUATOR 174 LONGITUDE.  THIS MESSAGE RECEIVED BY MR. L______ NEW YORK MEDIUM.

In March 1937, Amelia Earhart and her husband, George Palmer Putnam, study the flight route before her ill-fated attempt to fly around the world, which ended with her disappearance.

Mr. Putnam made a note of the position, intending to check it later on his maps, and filed the telegram away.  An hour or so later, when the morning mail was delivered, there came a brief but pleasant note from Capt. T_____ M______ of Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia.  Mr. Putnam eventually came to it, in the monotonous process of routine, and began reading:

“I am the retired captain of a copra boat that used to trade in the South Seas.  I just happened to remember an uncharted island that we frequently visited for turtle eggs.  The Gilbertese natives know where it is, too.  The island is at ______ ”

George Putnam was suddenly out of his office chair, yelling for his son. Dave! Oh, Dave!

David Putnam came, running.Trouble, Dad?

No. Listen, Dave. get me the telegram that came this morning from Ontario, Canada.  The one about the island near the Gilberts.

David fetched it, and he and his father nervously compared the latitude and longitude with that given in Capt. M ’s letter.  They were exactly the same!  The retired skipper’s letter, however, gave a more detailed location — 174 degrees, 10 minutes east longitude, 2 degrees, 36 minutes north latitude.  A hasty examination of a map located the spot, roughly about 85 miles from Tarawa Island.

Urgent telegrams were rushed to the Ontario medium and to Capt. M asking further details.  Suitcases were packed for a swift trip to New York.  The telephone wires throbbed with calls to navigation authorities, government officials, explorers, seasoned travelers — anyone who might have come upon that tiny dot of land in their wanderings

Two days later, in New York, George Putnam knew in his heart that he must have that island searched.  And finally, through the cooperation of Sumner Welles, Under-Secretary of State, the transatlantic cables to London pulsed with Mr. Putnam’s plea.  The British authorities agreed to communicate with their consul in the distant outpost and a search was arranged — at Mr. Putnam’s expense.

A vessel put out from Makin Island. skimmed through uncharted lanes and soon came to 174 east longitude, 2 degrees north latitude.

But the island had vanished.  The searching crew checked and re-checked their bearings.  They poured over maps, took soundings and cruised around the spot for two days.  But there was no land within 20 miles, there wasn’t one single clue to indicate what might have happened to that uncharted speck of earth.  And the island has not been found to this day.

While Putnam was in New York late that summer, stopping at the Barclay Hotel, he was approached by numerous persons who offered to sell him information concerning his missing wife’s whereabouts.  One man, Wilbur Rothar, a Bronx janitor, actually claimed he had found Miss Earhart on a South Seas island, and attempted to extort $2,000 from Putnam.  He was trapped by Dept. of Justice agents, found insane by a board of alienists, and sent to an asylum for life.

George Putnam returned to California — and the stream of letters still flowed.  But the edge of curiosity was dulled; he had not quite the same zest for searching the unknown.  Yet there were some whose challenge he could not resist.  And occasionally there were results which, though inexplicable, clearly showed how much the world has yet to learn about psychic phenomena, mental telepathy and related fields.  One of these experiences concerned Mr. Ka, a Los Angeles crystal gazer.  Accompanied by his son, David, and a stenographer, Mr. Putnam attended a demonstration in which Mr. Ka went into a trance over a huge crystal ball.  

After a moment of silence, he began reciting letters rapidly in a hollow, muffled tone.  He rattled them off for seven minutes and, when typed, they proved to be rambling sentences in Latin. Subsequently, when the message was translated, it contained an astonishing amount of little-known information about Amelia Earhart’s flight, and gave the location of the lost plane.

A search of the remote area described was out of the question.  And later, when Mr. Putnam called on the clairvoyant again, he was given another message which said, simply: “You are too late.”

George Putnam was convinced the whole performance was faked, until a confidential investigation disclosed that Mr. Ka was totally uneducated, spoke and wrote very poor English — and had never before given out a message in Latin.  (End of Part II.)

30 responses

  1. Christopher Roman | Reply

    Irene Bolam was Amelia Earhart, without a doubt, without question. The truth is stranger than fiction. Rollin Reineke,Joe Gervais,Joe Klass,all knew it,and I know it was. That’s the real story.

    Get Outlook for Android

    ________________________________

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    1. I assume you’ve already read the mountains of evidence that puts the lie to that idea, including so much on this site. So there’s nothing else to do except suggest that you see a professional therapist, or perhaps a priest, as you have had a severe break with reality, and might even be possessed. Do not respond further until you can announce a cure.
      MC

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  2. Sounds like the crackpots and the psychics were giving AE better advice than the military generals were.

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  3. Mike- this is fascinating information- never realized all of this went on after her disappearance-thanks

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  4. Mike – I hope you cover the attempts that Putnam made to Saipan while a commissioned officer during the war. He was still in the hunt for a grave site long after he declared AE deceased.

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    1. Mike,

      I’m not going there for a while. Researcher Les Kinney is vehemently opposed to the idea that Putnam visited Saipan. So to have a balanced and fair discussion, we need Les’ input. Recently he told me that he was too busy working on a project — not sure but maybe his book — to do a piece on another subject.

      Like

      1. Thanks for taking the question, Mike. Keep up the thorough work and excellent writing!

        Like

  5. The Morganthau transcript actually put up many question as to her fate. 1. Who’s orders did Amelia disregard? 2. We have the report of all those wireless messages and everything else. Where are they being kept? 3. What the hell does everything else mean? Good question! 4. What that woman- happened to her those last few minutes. Was somebody there to witness her crash? “Those last few minutes”, that part of the statement alone has volumes of meaning to me. She’s been murdered. Firing squad isn’t considered that awful. Hanging wasn’t really a Japanese thing. Being beheaded is fairly instant. What about dismemberment? Food for thought! 4. I hope I’ve got to just never make it public. So henious a fate they’re going to keep their mouths shut and let the crashed and sank story be their official line, even though they know exactly what happened to her. 5. Well, if she still want’s it, I’ll tell her-I mean what happened. WHAT HAPPENED? 6. It isn’t a very nice story. It sure isn’t! 7. Just send it back. This is a reference to the ONI report as to her fate/demise. What was your grandfather doing during all of this? I know what mine was doing!

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  6. David Atchason | Reply

    Marganthau could have been right, she was given secret orders somewhere along the line and perhaps she didn’t have the nerve to follow them, The orders probably had nothing to do with the around the world flight. Maybe she was given the orders in Lae, who knows?

    But one thing I am pretty sure of is that when all the alleged transmissions from her when she was in the vicinity of Howland were not real. She was in the proces at that time of landing on Mili Atoll. So maybe the Itasca logs were complete fiction? Could they have used recordings of her? And my favorite, that whatever recordings or records of what she was sayingin the last hour were only for the benefit of the Japanese who were certainly listening in? Maybe she was pleading for help and those pleas were expunged from the Itasca logbook? Everybody seemed to know her frequencies and McMenamin and others were listening in.

    WE don’t know what they heard, at least I have not heard. Supposedly the FBI approached those “hams” that were listening in and cautioned them to observe secrecy. I would still speculate that she had another frequency she was using to transmit the real situation she was in, probably giving her pleas for help, the Japanese planes closing in on her, etc. I don’t know how difficult it is now or then to find someone broadcasting on a mystery frequency who kept their messages very short. I would think it is very difficult, so she probably felt confident her secret frequency messages would not be heard. Why I get such opposition to this speculation I don’t quite understand.

    Another subject I still don’t quite understand is that when the Tokyo newspaper (The Advertiser?) printed their story of her rescue that they got the news from London, where the Japanese radio talk had been picked up and since the Japanese were using code, it meant that somebody in London had decoded the radio talk which was, of course, meant to be the utmost secret. Yet somehow the Japanese didn’t pick up on this? It still isn’t clear to me how this all worked out.

    I hope somebody figures out if the Kaga could have been in vicinity of the Marshalls or let me know again what the book is I could find it in.

    All Best,
    David

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    1. William H. Trail | Reply

      David,

      Let me address just one issue: On 2 July 1937 IJN Kaga was in Japanese home waters and about to depart for the waters off China in support of IJN/IJA operations in the Second Sino-Japanese War, which was precipitated by the 7 July “Marco Polo Bridge Incident.”

      Provided below for your convenience is a link to The Imperial Japanese Navy Page/Nihon Kaigun at http://www.combinedfleet.com/kaigun.htm I think you’ll find it very informative and a great resource.

      The Imperial Japanese Navy Page | Nihon Kaigun

      All best,

      William

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  7. I just looked it up and Carrier Group 2 left Sasebo for China July 11. Presumably the KAga was with them. It doesn’t single out the Kaga, so it doesn’t rule it out completely they were near the Marshalls but at least the Kaga was not under repair either. It’ s possible, I suppose, that they sent the Kaga to the Marshalls to monitor her flight. We just don’t know, or I don’t know.
    David

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  8. David Atchason | Reply

    Thanks, William, I will look there, too. Jameson’s new book claims the Kaga was in the vicinity of the Marshalls on July 2. Why she would be there, I have no idea. Why would the Japanese expect her to fly over the Marianas or the Marshalls anyway, except they knew the Amerians could be devious. I wonder on what basis Jameson got that idea? I suppose I could try contacting him. Even if his claim was true, that wouldn’t change anything. Looks like another dead end for now.

    David

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    1. Dave,

      Jameson’s book is no longer new and was thoroughly trashed by Les Kinney. Please check and tell us what, if any, source Jameson cites for his claim that Kaga was in the “vicinity” of the Marshalls on July 2. My hunch is that Jameson is simply guessing or speculating. Please let us know. I don’t have the fish wrapper, based on what a real researcher has said about it.

      Mike

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    2. William H. Trail | Reply

      David,

      You’re welcome, my friend.

      Using the post-1935 modernization numbers for IJN Kaga, let’s explore the possibilities of Jameson’s dubious assertion. Throughout I’ll use statute miles (sm) and miles per hour rather than nautical miles and knots. Kaga had a top speed of 32 mph, but as we know, ships only run at top speed for relatively limited periods of time. The cruising speed was a more moderate 17 mph — just a little over half the top speed. At 17 mph, Kaga had an endurance of 12,000 sm.

      Because we don’t have anything else more specific to work with, lets just use the distance from Jaluit in the Marshall Islands to Sasebo in Japan, which is 3,170.53 sm. Alright, as we have Speed and Distance, we can now calculate Time.

      By multiplying Kaga’s cruising speed of 17 mph by 24 we know that Kaga could travel 408 miles in a 24 hr period. Now, let’s divide the rounded up distance from Jaluit to Sasebo of 3,171 sm by 408, which is 7.7 — let’s just round up to 8.

      So, by my calculations it would, under optimum conditions, which is to say no storms, detours, breakdowns, or slowdowns, take Kaga just short of 8 days to travel at constant cruising speed from Jaluit to Sasebo. Assuming Kaga actually was in the vicinity of the Marshal Islands on Friday, 2 July 1937, and departed that location the same day, it’s reasonable to expect arrival at Sasebo on Saturday, 10 July. As Carrier Group Two sortied from Sasebo on 11 July that left less than 24 hours for Kaga to refuel, rearm, and replenish ship’s stores and provisions before sailing.

      W.C. Jameson’s “Amelia Earhart Beyond the Grave” (2016) Taylor Trade Publishing recounts Fuji Firmosa’s all too vague tale of shooting down the Electra in a short paragraph halfway down page 85. My skepticism of Firmosa’s story is heightened because of it’s lack of detail. One would think that a naval aviator/fighter pilot’s story would be more expansive and include a few more details. This does not. We have also heard this same story with Formosa launching from Akagi. Which one was it? As Jameson recounts Firmosa’s story he writes, “Firmosa encountered the Electra in the air and made two passes at it. During the second pass he [Firmosa] claimed he fired several rounds of bullets at the plane. Once struck, the plane began descending when Firmosa lost sight of it.” What happened on the first pass? I would also expect an aggressive, naval aviator/fighter pilot to have kept sight of the aircraft he just attacked and to have followed it down to ensure his victory. No “victory roll” over the vanquished? Also, having some modicum of experience with the 7.62 caliber M-60 machine gun, I know that one does not “fire several rounds of bullets.” One fires rounds in a series of short, controlled bursts. In the case of the M-60, typically of 3 to 9 rounds in a burst. Although the Mitsubishi A5M Type 96 carrier fighter (Allied code name: “Claude”) mounted two fixed, belt-fed, 7.7mm, Type 89 machine guns, synchronized to fire through the propeller arc, the principle of firing well-aimed, short, controlled bursts would have been the same. Vagueness and lack of detail in someone’s story are always signs of deception. In my assessment, Fuji Firmosa’s story lacks veracity from start to finish.

      All best,

      William
      Semper Verum Quaeritis

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      1. David Atchason

        Gulielmus,
        Verum mirabilius fictionem.

        I hadn’t thought of the Kaga trying to rejoin its carrier group, but I agree that it would be preposterous given the time frames. In fact, if the Kaga had sailed from the Marshalls to China it would have taken just about as long. I don’t know if there was any rule that said the carrier group could not have sailed without the Kaga. I seem to remember that the passengers from the wrecked Norwegian freighter said something about an aircraft carrier hanging around Jaluit, but this idea was torpedoed by wiser observers. Am I wrong in this recollection? It’s been a couple years now, but maybe it worth a look back?

        As far as believing Firmosa’s account, I defer to you as my realm of expertise is not in armaments, but in forklifts and two wheelers. But, considering his claim was in Japanese translated to Marshallese to English, I wonder if a lot might have been lost in translation. Now this isn’t a logical arguement, but to claim a real fighter pilot would have acted in “this manner” or would have used his machine gun in a “certain fashion” doesn’t mean that’s what actually happened. Even if the translations are accurate. The general idea, to me, is that it’s not impossible somebody shot her plane down. One thing that has always stuck in my mind, as we go through these exercises in largely speculations, is that assuming a “good” pilot or a “real” pilot would have done “such and such” can be a dangerous line of reasoning as it doesn’t prove what a real pilot actually did. This was taught to me in my early days on the TIGHAR forum by the Maestro, Ric Gillespie.

        I don’t know what my tenacious grip on this concept will achieve, but I would like to learn of what the survivors of the Norwegian shipwreck claimed to see while they were on Jaluit.
        Omnium Optimi,

        David

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      2. William H. Trail

        David,

        It doesn’t matter if Fuji Firmosa’s story was translated from Aramaic, to Greek, to Latin by an abby full of Benedictine monks. It didn’t happen. Neither Akagi, nor Kaga were in a position to be alerted and launch aircraft to find and shoot down the Electra on 2 July 1937. It’s a moot point. Now, Firmosa may have served in the Imperial Japanese Navy, and he may even have served aboard an aircraft carrier, I’ll grant you that, but I seriously doubt if he was a naval aviator. I do know his name is not listed among those achieving “ace” status — five confirmed victories in “Imperial Japanese Navy Aces 1937-45” by Henry Sakaida (1998), Osprey Publishing Limited.

        No, Fuji’s story sounds more like a tall tale spun to gullible, wide-eyed tourists in a dark corner of Bon Chance Louis’ Gold Monkey Bar in exchange for free drinks.

        All best,

        William
        Semper Verum Quaeritis

        Like

      3. David Atchason

        William,
        I like free drinks, too, but my comments here do not seem to be earning me one. I was just wondering what kinds of planes does a Japanese aviator have to shoot down to qualify as an ace? Do they all have to be military or would shooting down Amelia count? Actually, there is some seriousness to that question. There must be a straight answer to that.

        So, I seem to be the problem child these days, but in civilian life that’s the kind of personality I have. The more you guys shoot me down the more motivated I am to find my own satisfactory answer. Probably never will, though, but I haven’t given up quite yet.

        I contacted one of the experts who comments here rarely, (name witheld to protect the innocent) and he also tried to set me straight. He said the ‘aircraft carrier” that Captain Parker saw was actually the Kamoi, which he says was in Jaluit Harbor at the time (April/May?) 1937 I would think. TTAL does not say where the Kamoi was when Parker was at Jaluit but my contact says that Parker commented on the Kamoi’s activities including a description of plane accidents the Kamoi had that he (Parker) witnessed. When I looked up Parker on Google, it only says that Parker saw a destroyer and an aircraft carrier. Now I contended that Parker would not mistake the Kamoi for an “aircraft carrier” but who quoted Parker’s comments I do not know in either case. A little mixup here.

        My contact also said that, in any case, the Kaga could not, in a practical manner, sail inside the lagoon. I”ll take his word for that, but why would the Kaga want to be inside the lagoon? Or even be still at Jaluit on July 2, 1937? If she was ever there at all? So, to be tedious, whether Parker saw the Kamoi or the Kaga at Jaluit in the spring of 37, is not pertinent, is only a side issue, I know. It only serves to motivate someone like me to pursue the issue further.

        So, whether she was shot down or not is only a curiosity. WE still don’t know what she was doing at Mili and how or why she landed there. You would think, (here I violate Ric G.’s principle) if she was truly lost, or pretending to be lost, she would be on her radio constantly blabbering about her predicament. But she wasn’t, so I believe the more likely scenario is she was observing radio silence (recordings, maybe, were played near Howland) and was caught by surprise by one or more Japanese interceptors. That’s my opinion. So far, anyway. Could change.

        All Best,
        David

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      4. Dave,

        In TAL, p. 172-173 you will find reference to Parker’s sighting of the Kamoi at Jaluit, from Fred Goerner’s 1993 letter to G. Gordon Vaeth: “Parker testified to U.S. authorities that the Japanese seaplane carrier KAMOI had arrived at Jaluit mid-April, 1937, with three supporting destroyers.”

        Your “contact” can call Kamoi an “aircraft carrier,” but it was not such a beast. It was far smaller, a seaplane carrier, and you’re welcome to dig out the rest of the details for yourself.

        Mike

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  9. David Atchason | Reply

    Mike,
    I don’t know where he gets his info there are no footnotes. I was gratified to read that the Kaga was watching over Amelia’s flight, that goes along with my thinking, but looks like it was not true unless he has some specialized source he’s not divulging. THat doesn’t mean it didn’t happen. In fact, he has no idea what she was up to except apparently something clandestine. He makes mention of the frequent mechanical and electrical problems her plane was prone to, but doesn’t claim that was the reason she landed at Mili. He says there was an airfield there, I , maybe there was, I’ll have to look that up. He does mention you favorably in his book, so there is that. Maye he can be contacted. He has a lot of interesting theories, makes for a good read whether you believe him or not.
    David

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    1. Dave,

      I figured Jameson had no source for his statement about Kaga. He does that with just about everything, just wings it without attribution. This is why Les Kinney gave the book one star, because it’s a bad book. Jameson’s book also promotes the Irene Bolam lie, which is really the bottom of the barrel, as bad as it gets. It’s a waste of time and money for any serious Earhart student.

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      1. Further thoughts about W.C. Jameson’s Amelia Earhart: Beyond the Grave (2016):

        This book came out the same year as the second edition of Truth at Last. FOX News, which has always been a leading enemy of the Earhart truth, actually promoted Beyond the Grave on their website, which is why the book can probably be considered to be “fake opposition.” Jameson’s ideas, none of which are original, are so poorly presented and undocumented that it reflects badly on other Earhart books and taints legitimate research, just as Joe Klaas and Joe Gervais did in 1970 with Amelia Earhart Lives whether by design or inadvertently. But Joe Klaas was a talented writer (his 1955 book Maybe I’m Dead, was praised as the best World War II novel since Normal Mailer’s The Naked and the Dead), and AE Lives was a far better book, despite its many failures, than Beyond the Grave, which is truly awful.

        With the 2016 publication of Jameson’s Earhart book, the original false crashed-and-sank government line and its now more acceptable but unofficial (barely) secondary option, Nikumaroro, are bolstered and legitimized in the eyes of the uninformed. When someone who can think but has no other background knowledge about the Earhart disappearance, reads Jameson’s book, he naturally rejects the garbage that Jameson presents and more than ever accepts the government-media lies. Beyond the Grave has also been a failure, with only 28 reviews on Amazon, compared to 209 for Truth at Last, despite TAL being blacked by the entire mainstream media and never mentioned by FOX or any other networks.

        If you do an Amazon search on Jameson, you’ll see he’s also written lots of books as an “expert” on multiple mysteries, buried treasures and personalities of the old West (including his Billy the Kid: Beyond the Grave), so much so that it tends to discredit him. None of his books have sold well, which is another “tell” about Jameson. In other words, he’s a prolific hack and not an real expert on anything.

        Mike

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      2. William H. Trail

        Mike,

        I have to admit that I have a copy of Jameson’s book. Then again, my poor, long suffering wife is of the opinion that I have every Amelia Earhart book there is. I do have a few. However, with my sincere apologies to the late Italian film director, Sergio Leone, I’ve placed all of my AE books into one of three categories — The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly.

        All best,

        William

        Like

      3. William,

        Based on your comment, I will assume that you have placed W.C. Jameson’s Amelia Earhart: Beyond the Grave in one or both of the two latter categories you list.

        Mike

        Like

  10. David Atchason | Reply

    Yes, I looked it up https://text-message.blogs.archives.gov/2017/07/20/captain-alfred-parker-on-jaluit-atoll-march-april-1937/
    Just as I thought, Captain Parker sighted 3 destroyers and one AIRCRAFT CARRIER at Jaluit Harbor in the spring of 1937. Guess which aircraft carrier that could be?
    I know when I noted this a while ago I got scoffed at. You would think Capt. Parker would know an A. C. when he saw one. Maybe there is some validity to Jameson’s claim.

    David

    Like

    1. The spring is not the summer, Dave. You’re jumping to conclusions again.

      Like

  11. David Atchason | Reply

    I’m not concluding anything, but Parker says there is an aircraft carrier there in what, May? Why shouldn’t it be still there on July 2nd? What we have, according to Parker is an A.C. all by itself, not attached at that time to 2nd Carrier Group. When William sent me the itinerary site, I thought it would specify what the Kaga itself was doing, but it doesn’t. It leaves a little wiggle room for the Kaga to be off by itself. So, if there is a record of what the Kaga did somewhere we can scrutinize and it specifies it was sitting at Sasebo on July 2nd then we don’t know for sure, yet. That’s my only conclusion so far, that is we need more specific records if they exist. For now it leaves the door open a crack for Jameson to be right.

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    1. Your logic is seriously lacking and I shouldn’t have to explain it.
      MC

      Like

  12. This is off topic but this is one place where I believe this type of news is appreciated:

    Clayton Schenkelberg, who experienced one of the most fateful days in modern U.S. history, the Dec. 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor that shoved the United States into World War II, died April 14 at a senior care facility in San Diego.

    At 103, he was believed to be America’s oldest Pearl Harbor survivor. A Navy torpedoman at a submarine base, Schenkelberg volunteered to drive a train loaded with the underwater missiles away from strafing Japanese airplanes. Then he ran to an armory, grabbed a rifle and started shooting back.

    RIP Clayton, and thank you.

    Like

    1. Clayton Schenkelberg was a true war hero and one of America’s finest! Requiesce in pace.

      Thanks Tom.

      MC

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  13. David Atchason | Reply

    Just meandering around Google found this. https://ww2db.com/ship_spec.php?ship_id=9
    Interesting how detailed the record is after Nov. 1937, yet nothing from 1929-1937. I wonder why? If the Japanese/American alliance was trying to hide the records, why not simply falsify them? Who is going to visit Japan these days to check up on the records? I must say the Dept. of Disinformation is on the ball if their intention is concealment of embarrassing info. Hmmm
    David

    Like

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