1937 Tokyo message to D.C. reveals Earhart Truth

The below document is likely a U.S. Navy intercept of a July 5, 1937 message sent by someone in the Japanese government in Tokyo with the code name”OIMATSU,” possibly someone in the Imperial Japanese Navy, to the Japanese Naval Attache, Washington (Captain Kengo Nakamura Kobayashi, see comments for more) concerning the disappearance of Amelia Earhart.  (Boldface and italic emphasis mine throughout.)  

Researcher Tony Gochar, of Guam (see pages 263-264 Truth at Last), sent me this declassified dispatch in November 2020 after he received it from a source in Washington.  Others may be aware of this message, but it was the first time I’ve seen it, and it appears to be significant, a document that Vincent V. Loomis, whose mid-’80s Tokyo research revealed Japan’s lies about its search for Earhart in the Marshall Islands, would have showcased in his 1985 book, Amelia Earhart: The Final Story. 

Note that the date is just three days after Earhart, Fred Noonan and Electra NR 16020 went missing.  Our copy isn’t easy to read, so here’s the message: 

We are in receipt of intelligence reports to the effect that the U.S. Navy is launching a large scale search for the lost Miss Earhart.  Since it is believed that she went down in the vicinity of the Marshall Islands area, the Government of the South Sea Islands has ordered all ships (lookouts?) and communication facilities to cooperate in the discovering of her.  We (several words crossed out) have communicated our desires to assist in this search, through our Ambassador in Washington, to the U.S. Government.

This offer was made not only as an expression of good will, but for the purpose of preventing the United States’ merchant and fighting vessels which are searching for Miss Earhart, from coming too close to the Marshall Islands(End message.)

Hand printed below the above is “*Chief of Bureau of Military Affairs, Navy Department.”  When this message was declassified is unknown, as is Tony Gochar’s source. 

The document begins by saying they (IJN) ‘are in receipt of intelligence reports,Gochar wrote in a Nov. 9, 2020 email.  My opinion is that these intelligence reports are from Japanese radio intelligence and DF (Direction Finding) stations in the Pacific area.  The second sentence seems crystal clear: ‘Since it is believed that she went down in the vicinity of the Marshall Islands area.’  How did they know this on July 5, 1937?  Their intelligence reports would have provided this detail.”

This section of a “Sketch Survey” of Mili Atoll taken from U.S. and Japanese charts focuses on the northwest quadrant of Mili Atoll, where Barre (Burrh) Island is noted.  Witnesses saw the Electra come down near Barre, and Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan were seen embarking the Electra and seeking shelter in the tiny Endriken Islands. 

Naysayers who reject the truth will find it extremely difficult to find an interpretation for this message that keeps the fliers and the Electra out of the Marshall Islands and Japanese captivity.  Based on 84 years of government-media lies and denial, we know that this virtual smoking gun will never be acknowledged by any mainstream media organization — or any other kind, for that matter. 

Few will hear about this, but that doesn’t stop us from continuing to speak the truth to those willing to hear and accept it.   

35 responses

  1. Mike, this is really fascinating. Not surprised at all to see a letter like this surface. Any way to find out more about the source in Washington who came across the document? Sure seems like there has to be more out there along these lines.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Tiffany,

      If Tony wanted to reveal his source to me, he would have done so. I haven’t heard from him in many months and am concerned about his well being. This could well be a one-off situation, and I’m extremely grateful to Tony for his kindness.

      Mike

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Greetings to All:

    According to OrientalOutpost.com, “Oimatsu” is Japanese for “Old Pine Tree.” Who could have been “Old Pine Tree?” Just a wild guess, but it could be a nickname from the author’s time as a midshipman at Eta Jima, the Imperial Japanese Naval Academy. Also, if my reading of the data at the bottom of the transcribed intercept of 5 July 1937 is correct, it wasn’t translated until 17 months later, on 15 December 1938.

    All best,

    William

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Mike, this is fascinating information, but as you say, coming 84 years later, it is not likely anyone in the US Government will ever acknowledge this smoking gun. How very sad that our government refuses to acknowledge what all evidence points to–that Amelia and Fred went down in the vicinity of the Marshall Islands, was captured by Japanese Imperial forces, and were subsequently executed. If Mr. Trail’s comment above about a 17-month delay in translation of this document is correct, and I believe he is, then this cable is an even bigger reason for the US government to refuse to accept the TRUTH of what really happened, since to do so would be an admission of their careless incompetence in searching for Amelia and Fred 17 months earlier. Thank you for continuing to fight the good fight, Mike.

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  4. There could be a number of interpretations of the information contained in message, and also some reasons about the date of translation.

    First is the reference to “we are in receipt of intelligence reports…” This indicates that the comments were NOT in response to any official request from the US Government to Japan to assist in the search for Amelia and Fred. Rather, it refers to information which came to the Japanese government agency or individual “OIMATSU” through their official intel sources. That information could very well have been gleaned from US newspaper reports, human sources within the US government, or from Pacific area intercepts of US Navy radio transmissions.

    The 17 month delay in translation of the message could have occurred for a number of reasons. If the message was encrypted when sent on 5 July 1937, it is possible that it (along with a lot of other encrypted message traffic) was recorded in the encrypted form, but that, at the time, the US may have lacked the codes necessary to de-code it. Also, there may have been a delay after decryption before Japanese to English language translators got to it. Those delays were likely also influenced by the precedence given to the message when first intercepted.

    I can state from personal experience in researching Japanese WW II documents that many of them remain untranslated to this date.

    Context is very important in considering this document, and knowing what other messages or documents were filed along with it might be a key to understanding its meaning and importance.

    I doubt that this was sent by an IJN midshipman. “OIMATSU” was likely the code name of a particular office or agency which regularly communicated with the Japanese ambassador to the United States. It seems to be worded in a way to instruct the ambassador of what to diplomatically say to US officials. Of interest is the last line, which indicates that Japan did NOT want any US ships anywhere near “their” Marshall Islands.

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    1. Richard,

      Sorry if I wasn’t clear. The burden of communication is on the communicator. What I was trying to say was that “OIMATSU” may have been a nickname acquired by the author of the message years earlier when a student at the Imperial Japanese Naval Academy at Etajima. It is possible that the Naval Attache in Washington (I believe it to be Captain Kengo Kobayashi, DOB: circa 1898) and the author of the message were old classmates, and the “Old Pine Tree” sobriquet would have been immediately recognized. Of course, “OIMATSU” could also be something else entirely. Who knows. It’s something to chew on.

      As for your rationale for the long delayed decryption and translation, I believe you are spot-on, sir.

      All best,

      William

      Liked by 1 person

      1. The asterisk implies Oimatsu is the Chief of Bureau of Military Affairs, Navy Dept; it appears Soemu Toyoda (final rank Admiral) was in that position from 2 December 1935 to 20 October 1937.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Tom,

        Many thanks! I’m glad you saw that asterisk because I sure didn’t. I totally missed it.

        All best,

        William

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Some information on Admiral Toyoda, IJN. He survived the war and was interviewed by a number of US Naval Officers. I wonder if the subject of Amelia Earhart ever came up?

        Japanese Admiral Soemu Toyoda
        Born May 22, 1885
        Died September 22, 1957 (aged 72)
        Place of birth Kitsuki, Ōita, Japan
        Place of death Tokyo, Japan
        Allegiance Empire of Japan
        Service/branch Imperial Japanese Navy
        Years of service 1905-1945
        Rank Admiral

        Admiral Soemu Toyoda (1885-1957) was the commander-in-chief of the Japanese Combined Fleet during the crushing defeats in the battles of the Philippine Sea and Leyte Gulf (both 1944), where his desire for a ‘decisive battle’ played a part in both defeats.

        Toyoda graduated from the Japanese Naval Academy in 1905 and by the time the Japanese entered the Second World War had risen to the rank of full Admiral (September 1941). He was commander of the Kure Naval Station at the time of Pearl Harbor, became part of the Supreme War Council in November 1942 and in May 1943 became commander of the Yokosuka Naval Base. He was considered to be brilliant but sarcastic, and rather difficult to work with…

        LINKS:

        http://www.historyofwar.org/articles/people_toyoda_soemu.html

        https://military.wikia.org/wiki/Soemu_Toyoda

        https://ww2db.com/person_bio.php?person_id=45

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Richard,

        Many thanks for the links for Soemu Toyoda. Very interesting and much appreciated! I’m still kicking myself for missing that very important asterisk. Good catch by Tom Williams.

        I’m still curious about the significance of “Oimatsu.” Is it a personal nickname, a codeword, what? Was it used in other messages?

        All best,

        William

        Liked by 1 person

  5. William,

    You may be correct in your theory that Oimatsu could be a “nickname”. The text of the message seems to be meant to brief the Japanese Naval attache in Washington about what Tokyo thoughts and concerns were concerning the Amelia Earhart incident, and what had been officially stated to the ambassador.

    Since it does not appear in the format of an official order or instruction, but rather as an informational message, it is very possible that the sender was personally known to the Naval attache.

    The message does not appear to be something that would have been highly classified (by the Japanese). It refers to Japanese policy as already stated to the Ambassador for relay to the US government. Any classification attached to it (such as Confidential or Secret) would have been assigned by the US Navy – and such a classification would probably have been due to their method of obtaining and decoding it – rather than due to the message content itself.

    The idea that Oimatsu might be an individual’s nickname is an interesting one. I wonder if there were any other messages intercepted/decoded that have Oimatsu as the originator.

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  6. Would seem to leave little doubt that the Japanese were well aware of their location, and the danger of US Navy vessels approaching fortified territory..why is it so difficult to believe that they then picked them up and took them eventually to Saipan? Wonder of Ric Gillespie knows of this…probably, but ignores it/

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  7. The “Washington source” for the document you are discussing is one of a series that I sent to Tony several years go. It was briefly scene for a second or so on the History Channels 1917 production. It was part of one of my research forays in 2012.

    Les Kinney

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Les. I figured you might know about this. I’m glad you shared it with Tony, as you obviously had no intention of sharing it with the rest of us. The fact that the History Channel gave it such short shrift is just more evidence of how little they value the truth.

      Regardless of whether some question its “context,” it’s still an important document, and I’m glad it’s finally out and available to all, as it should be.

      Mike

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Greetings to all,

    Mike thank you for your concern. Life just moves a little more slowly for me.

    I have a large number of files from NARA and I don’t always organize them in a proper way. I believe Les provided the document to me. Thank you Les for confirming that.

    Among the reasons I had for discussing the document was that the Japanese seem to have had a very good idea of where AE went down. If there has been a previous discussion on this blog of the implications of the substance of the message, then I apologize for missing it. I did some searching in the blog and could not find a mention of such discussion.

    I wanted to take a step back and analyze the text with a ‘plain view’ of the words used. The route of the message seems obvious as it is being sent from IJN in Tokyo to the Naval Attaché in Washington, DC on July 5, 1937. “Since it is believed she went down in the vicinity of the Marshall Islands area…”, and this causes me to wonder where this information came from. My opinion is that Japanese military or civilian radio stations in the area were following her flight. She stopped having radio contact after the time she should have made it to Howland. Someone in the Pacific mandated area thought this belief was important enough to pass the information on to IJN in Tokyo.

    Next is the statement of the intention of the message which implies they are trying to assist in locating AE. “…the Government of the South Sea Islands has ordered all ships, (lookouts?), and communication facilities to cooperate in the discovering of her. (We?) Of this country also have communicated our desires to assist in this search, through our Ambassador in Washington, to the U.S. Government.”

    Besides stating their intention of assisting in the search for AE they very bluntly state the second reason which is to prevent US ships from getting into their mandated areas. The tone of this part of the message seems to me to very clearly imply they would have no problem of physically confronting any encroaching US vessels. “This offer was made not only as an expression of good will, but for the purpose of preventing the United States’ merchant and fighting vessels which are searching for Miss Earhart, from coming too close to the Marshall Islands.

    I can only guess that #339 is a sequence number for this translated message. I do not know what went before or after it. I agree that the translation date appears to be 12/15/38. I can only speculate about the timing of the translation. In my opinion this kind of diplomatic message would be classified. I do not believe such a message would be based on speculation or fabrication. The IJN was presenting the best information they had to their Naval Attaché in Washington.

    Best Regards, Tony Gochar

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Tony,

      Good to hear from you, thanks for your message and clarification. The NARA document, as I expected, is creating more than a normal buzz, and it’s good that it’s out in general circulation now.

      All Best,
      MIke

      Liked by 1 person

  9. That the Japanese could have told the truth, that they had Earhart, did not fit with the narrative that Japan was the enemy of America, so it went unsaid. History has stories like that.

    Like

    1. Ken, you are taking a revisionist attitude and viewing things in hindsight that does not acknowledge the attitudes during those times.

      During the 1930s, Japan had expansionist ambitions and planned to dominate Asia and the Pacific region. The Japanese viewed the U.S. Navy presence at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii very much a threat to those goals and viewed the U.S. as a potential enemy.

      Japan invaded Manchuria in 1931 and was planning to invade China in July 1937. The U.S. was adamantly against any hostile actions against China. How do you think the Japanese felt when they saw an American airplane flying in the vicinity of their islands on the eve of a planned military action? The Japanese were very paranoid about keeping their military buildup secret from the U.S. and viewed Earhart and Noonan as spies.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. It’s mind boggling sometimes to think of the millions of individual decisions that went into making WWII what it was. I’m not sure it was avoidable. Several people did try to stop it. One of those was Lindbergh. He was not successful.

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    1. Lindbergh advocated staying out of the war in Europe. But the American people focused its attention toward Europe and paid little attention to what was going on in Asia, i.e, the Japanese invasion of Manchuria in 1931 and China in 1937 went unnoticed.

      Most people cite the start of World War II in Europe in 1939, but ignored the fact there was already a large-scale war being waged in Asia and the Pacific region since 1931. Japan’s military expansionism in Asia was very much a threat as was Germany’s expansionism in Europe. Where was Lindbergh in 1937 and why didn’t he and others voice opposition to the growing Japanese threat in Asia?

      Liked by 1 person

  11. I never bought a book and had a response from the author until Mike responded to me. This subject fascinates me and I respect all the responses and opinions I read. So many of you guys and gals are so much more versed than me on AE and FN but I am always ready to read the next post. God bless everyone through the crazy times we are currently living through.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. A most intriguing and obscure document. It’s amazing and mind-boggling that any information or documentation that indicates Japan was following Earhart’s flight, and knew they went down in the vicinity of Marshall Islands, were captured and taken to Saipan are quickly squashed and erased from the files of history.

    I read somewhere that although the Japanese kept meticulous records of their Pacifc region activities, communication between Saipan and Tokyo circa 1937-1938 are curiously sparse or missing. Same with communication between Japan and U.S. during that same time period. Those were indeed enigmatic times.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. When Mike telegraphed us to stand by for new revelation, I thought he meant evidence of communication between Japan and USA concerning the apprehension of Miss Earhart. So my expectations were dashed, but we get something almost as good, which is virtual proof that she landed in the Marshalls. Take that! Mr. Gillespie. Except this development will never appear in the MSM, and if it doesn’t appear there, it’s the same as not even existing, it’s like a quantum particle that has to be observed to be real.

    However, I still am of the persuasion that there was contact on the subject, probably extensive. I clicked on the link “Japan lies” in the above and found some very interesting stories of the loss or destruction of Japanese documents after the War. Without being specific, it does give me the impression that any given record could be altered or disappeared, no one was being scrupulous about these papers, so relying on the remaining records to be accurate or in some cases to even exist anymore would be possibly futile.

    Whether Kamoi or Koshu picked up her plane is still unclear to me and probably doesn’t matter. So, I read this article. https://text-message.blogs.archives.gov/2017/07/20/captain-alfred-parker-on-jaluit-atoll-march-april-1937/ One thing I want to mention is that the famed picture of Fred and Amelia on the dock at Jaluit is apparently part of a series of Jaluit pictures, it wasn’t that someone spotted them and took a single shot as proof. Where is the rest of the series and what did they show? I did read that Japan had abrogated the Treaty of Versailles and the covenants so she was now free in her view to do whatever she wanted militarily, it didn’t much matter who caught Japan doing what, the treaty no longer applied.

    Now I have in the past mentioned that Captain Parker of the Fijian stated that he saw 3 destroyers and an Aircraft carrier in the harbor when he was there earlier in 1937. I was corrected on this by Mr. Trail, I think, who said Parker was mistaken, he saw a seaplane carrier, at least I think that was how the exchange went. Anyway, if planes from the aircraft carrier, possibly the Kaga, shot her down, it would make for an interesting conversation between Tokyo and Washington. I tend to believe that such a conversation did take place. Maybe she took it upon herself to fly over the Marshalls, but I think it more likely she was instructed to do so.

    The above very astute comment by Ken McGhee opened my eyes today. Possibly the Japanese were very diplomatic when they told the USA they had picked her up and she and Fred were treated well, temporarily. But reports of such conversations were hushed up. Whatever the USA said did not please the Japanese and they had no choice but to hold her. It’s even possible they treated her well until the end of the war, knowing she had been duped into her overflight. When someone wrote that Lindbergh had attempted to avoid a war with Germany, well, he was painted as anti-semitic and his reputation was besmirched, by the same people who had financed Hitler in the first place.

    For some reason, back in 1904 Japan had been financed by Jacob Schiff and the New York bankers, and their victory over the Russians made them a Pacific powerhouse. Same as the Union Bank and associates like Prescott Bush helped make Hitler’s Germany a powerhouse. However. as Ken McGhee said, the narrative was that they were our enemies. AS we have lately seen. it’s not unusual for countries like the US to invent and finance enemies like ISIS, Israel apparently uses similar techniques, but I digress.

    So, a lot of history is not what we’ve been told. Maybe FDR’s scheme to make Japan the evil enemy ( not that they were not capable of atrocities) wouldn’t go over well with the American public then or now. Still, I have pointed out that as a youth I heard some people express this viewpoint, so not everybody was happy with FDR’s actions even then.

    David

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  14. I don’ t think lindbergh did anything for the cause of finding Earhart, but he could have. I see him as a Tragic figure in all this. Both Lindbergh and Earhart’s fame and popularity went beyond their actual contributions.

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    1. Ken,

      No, I don’t think Colonel Lindbergh (he still held a commission as a Colonel in the U.S. Army Air Corps at the time) did anything to help find Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan, either. But, then again, what exactly could he have done? What could anyone have reasonably expected him to do?

      At the time Lindbergh and his wife, Anne Morrow Lindbergh, were living in Great Britain. In 1936 he’d toured Nazi Germany surveying German aviation development and the growing Luftwaffe. From February through April 1937, Charles and Anne Lindbergh flew to India (including Karachi, which is now in modern day Pakistan) and back. Later in 1937, Charles Lindbergh would be invited back to Germany as a guest of the German government and would tour aviation production facilities and other important sites such as the Luftwaffe flight test facility at Rechlin just outside Berlin and actually talked with such persons as Herman Goering and Ernst Udet. The Nazis gave Lindbergh access, and he brought back a lot of good aviation intelligence, which was written up in an general estimate and sent back to Washington under the signature of Major Truman Smith, the U.S. Military Attache in Great Britain.

      In truth, it may not have even occurred to Lindbergh that AE and FN were not just simply lost, but in the hands of the Japanese.

      All best,

      William

      Like

      1. William,

        Off topic but since you mentioned Ernst Udet; one of my favorite books growing up was “They Fought For The Sky” by Quentin Reynolds……outstanding book about WWI aviation.

        Like

      2. Tom,

        We probably read a lot of the same books growing up. I read Reynolds’ “They Fought For The Sky” as well. It’s a true classic. I think I’ve read every one of Arch Whitehouse’s books too — “Heroes Of The Sunlit Sky,” “Years Of The Sky Kings,” and “The Zeppelin Fighters” come to mind.

        All best,

        William

        Like

      3. Quentin Reynolds was a very good writer and excellent story teller. I first read a book by him titled “70,000 to One” about a B-17 bombardier Gordon Manuel, who was the sole survivor of his shot up plane and who evaded capture on a South Pacific Island held in force by the Japanese army.

        Like

      4. Richard;

        I read that book, but had forgotten all about it! I thought it was great. I had no idea who wrote it.

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Richard,

        I didn’t know about Reynolds’ “70,000 to One.” Sounds like a great read. Thanks for the tip. I’ll look for it.

        All best,

        William

        Liked by 1 person

  15. Mike –

    I don’t know why everyone is so CHARGED UP about this? Of course they landed in the *Marshall Islands, where else could she have disappeared to? Ric Gillespie’s FANTASY Island/Nikumororo.
    I stopped contemplating, that our government will one day reveal all this. It’s NEVER GOING TO HAPPEN…………..
    The United States & Japan are too ashamed to admit all this, let alone explain, why they avoid any serious discussions about it. So for now on, you will not read any posts from me, saying how dumb founded this all seems and why doesn’t our government admit it?ll

    Mike & Les have EXPOSED it and if you don’t believe them? Then your BLIND!

    Doug – (fell 3 weeks ago at work on the loading dock, injured my right arm and finally able to type but with PAIN)

    Like

    1. Doug,

      So sorry to hear about your injury. You need to leave that damn job and move to Florida. You’re risking your life up there, for what?

      Mike

      Like

  16. Greetings to All:

    Maybe it’s just me, but using the resources available to me on the internet — principally, combinedfleet.com — I haven’t been able to come up with much on Captain Kengo Kobayashi, the Imperial Japanese Naval Attache in Washington, DC at the time of AE and FN’s landing in the Marshalls. Kobayashi was born circa 1898. Based on his date of birth, he most likely would have graduated from the Naval Academy at Etajima around 1918. He was posted to Washington as Naval Attache on 25 October 1936. Previously Kobayashi served a tour as an aide to the Emperor. He had some commands at sea and was promoted to Vice Admiral on 15 October 1944.

    All best,

    William

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I believe that this is information about Admiral Kengo Kobayashi:

      Kengo Nakamura Kobayashi
      BIRTH 22 Mar 1893
      Tokyo Metropolis, Japan
      DEATH 23 Apr 1948 (aged 55)
      Russia
      BURIAL
      Tama Cemetery
      Fuchu City, Fuchū-shi, Tokyo Metropolis, Japan

      There is a photo of him at the below link:

      https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/202865254/kengo-kobayashi

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Not that this gives any answer, but if the japanese were fearful that the USN ships would come looking. why didn’t they just hand over Amelia and Fred? They handed over Captain Parker and his crew earlier in the year and they were able to observe more than AE ever did. That must mean she did something other than she just happened to be flying over Mili. If she were truly lost it doesn’t seem they would have kept her. She couldn’t have told them she was near Howland and managed to then get herself all the way to Mili. No one would believe that even if one or more commentators on this blog have proposed that. I suppose it’s not completely impossible, though.

    Don’t we know from captured Japanese records where all the IJN ships were at the time of her flight? Don’t we now know that there was nothing extraordinary going on with the IJN at that time? No secret weapons or shocking deployments at Truk? I doubt the US military at the time thought there was. I mean I doubt they sent her on an extremely dangerous mission when there was nothing much to be gained. Even if the US gained some samples of their code through radio intercepts it still seems far too dangerous for her to fly over the Marshalls for that. Did she really independently fly over because of some personal reason of her own? Morganthau might have been alluding to that. Did she come with some peace offer from a group of “isolationists?”

    Nowadays that word has some connotation of disloyalty, but at the time it was a perfectly sensible persuasion to have after the senseless ( but very profitable) carnage of WW1. Was FDR under the spell of “The Bankers?” The same bankers who facilitated The Great Depression and now were drooling with anticipation at the prospect of a big score and virtual world domination? No wonder her plane was sabotaged upon her initial takeoff from Hawaii.

    At first the Japanese let her have free rein in Jaluit. They were anticipating being congratulated on saving the brave aviatrix. Sure, they offered to send her home. FDR was delighted they held her. Whatever was negotiated, the Japanese were not pleased as per the plan. The last thing FDR wanted was a big mouth Amelia back in The States. I suppose the Japanese, being righteously paranoid, did not want their relatively feeble South Seas Islands defenses revealed. In the end, the insatiable bankers prevailed. Forrestal saw that. Lindbergh did, too. Maybe we can see it if we open our eyes.

    Sincerely,
    David

    Liked by 1 person

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