Was Earhart Electra found on Canton Island in ’37?

Researcher Woody Rogers recently forwarded an old newspaper story I’d not seen before, from a paper whose pages lacked any datelines or folios for easy identification, but which could only have been the Charleston (South Carolina) Evening Post, the only Evening Post operating in the United States in 1939. *

This provocative screed, published as early as July 1939 but possibly later that year (based on other stories on the page), would have the local South Carolinians, and by extension, the entire world, believe that Amelia Earhart’s Electra had “washed up” on Canton Island in the Pacific, minus Earhart and Fred Noonan, of course, during the July 1937 Navy-Coast Guard search, and that the Navy kept the news from the public. 

Here’s the story, presented as best I can to retain some of the original, while adding some informative images (boldface emphasis mine throughout; caps emphasis in original; please click on images for larger views):

message was suppressed, but never denied.  A few days afterward, the navy abandoned the search that cost the government hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Take Over Island

And by a rare coincidence, the United States government over the indignant protestations of European powers, TOOK OVER CANTON ISLAND A FEW WEEKS LATER.

Why should America want this insignificant island in the middle of the Pacific Ocean?  Why should this country have risked certain diplomatic relationships for the right to possess this deserted bit of land?

And why, above all, was the order given to send virtually the entire Pacific fleet on an extensive manhunt when the Oriental situation was ready to boil over at any moment?

What About Data

Was Miss Earhart’s mission as innocently scientific as the world was led to believe?  And what was the nature of the scientific data she hoped to gather ostensibly for Purdue university?  Exactly what she and Noonan were after has never been revealed.  The purpose of her journey was cloaked simply with the mysterious phrase, scientific observations.

Why did the government permit her to take off in the first place, inasmuch as the department of air commerce [sic] publicly frowned on the flight and doubted its scientific value?  And why, then, did the government immediately order most of its Pacific fleet, along with scores of navy fliers, to seek the missing plane when word was first received that it was lost?

Search First of Kind

Never before in the history of transoceanic flying had such a search been ordered?

Why? the world new asks.

The public may never know the real answers.  We may only guess the exact fate of

(Continued from page one)

Frederick Noonan? 

If the Earhart flight were an innocent scientific excursion, why should the navy want to keep secret the fact that the airplane was beached in this this lonely island in the middle of the Pacific?  What was there to be gained by such secrecy?

On the other hand, if Miss Earhart had in her possession important diplomatic information picked up on her tour of the globe, would it not be to the great advantage of this country to remain forever silent on the discovery of the airplane?  And if silence was so important, wouldn’t it be logical that the island which contained the only evidence of Miss Earhart’s tragedy be taken over and held by the United States government?

May Not Be Answered 

The entire situation is rife with questions.  Questions which will probably never be answered officially.  

It must be borne in mind that at the time of the Earhart flight, conditions in the Orient were none too secure.  Most Americans took an aloof stand on the Sino-Japanese war.  America will never war with Japan, it was said.  But the navy knew better.  The navy was taking no chances.  There were Americans in China, and they were there because there were extensive American holdings in the Orient 

The entire Pacific fleet was hovering in Oriental waters at the time.  It left the danger zone ONLY LONG ENOUGH TO SEARCH FOR MISS EARHART’S PLANE [sic]. 

Earhart’s official flight plan, 2,556 statute miles from Lae, New Guinea to Howland Island. The 337-157 line of position, or sun line, passed through the Phoenix Islands, near Gardner Island, now known as Nikumaroro, and the popular false theory is in part attributable to this. Note location of Canton Island (far right just under USCG Itasca and Winslow Reef), in the same general area as Gardner, McKean and Enderbury Islands in the Phoenix group.  Map taken from Earhart’s Flight Into Yesterday: The Facts Without the Fiction, by Lawrence Safford, with Cameron A. Warren and Robert R. Payne.

Hypothetical Case

Let’s study a purely hypothetical case.

An American flier has won the hearts of the world.  The flier is better beloved because she is a woman, and her soul is in aviation.  She has been successful in a number of previous flights.  And now she is contemplating a round-the-world flight.

In various capitals of the world, agents of the government have obtained secret military information, valuable to American authorities.  It is sometimes difficult to get such information safely back to the state department [sic] without interference by outside countries.

Suddenly the government sees and ingenious way of obtaining the information, bringing it back for expert study in Washington.  What could be more innocent than a round-the-world flight by one of America’s most popular heroines?  Who could possibly suspect such a woman of ulterior motives?

So arrangements are made.  The government officially frowns on the flight but issues the license.  All part of the plan.  It is announced that the mission is a scientific one, but it is never deemed necessary to announce precisely what the nature of the scientific investigation is.

No Embarrassing Papers

As the flier speeds around the globe, she is greeted by hundreds of persons wherever she stops.  She is cheered all along the way.  There are no embarrassing papers to be filled out.  No questions to answer, passports a mere formality.  That is one of the courtesies governments extend to daring fliers of another nation.

But in some of the crowds are secret government agents.  With absolute safety, they slip her maps, charts, notes bearing important military secrets, obtained in devious ways known only to agents.

Meanwhile. her own nation is watching with keen interest the success of the flight.  Everyone hopes she succeeds, but state department officials have a double reason for praying for the success of the undertaking.  

The flier is on her last long hop.  She has everything she wants.  Everything her government is waiting for.  And then, in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, something happens.  There is a frantic flash from her radio.  Something has gone wrong.  She is overdue.  Nothing more is heard.  

AND IMMEDIATELY ALMOST THE ENTIRE PACIFIC FLEET IS DISPATCHED TO FIND HER.

Aerial view of Canton Island in 1945 showing SS President Taylor grounded in an entrance to the atoll, above left. Canton Island (from Wikipedia, also known as Kanton or Abariringa), is the largest, northernmost, and as of 2020, the sole inhabited island of the Phoenix Islands, in the Republic of Kiribati. It is an atoll located in the South Pacific Ocean roughly halfway between Hawaii and Fiji. Canton’s closest neighbor is the uninhabited Enderbury Island, 63 km (39 mi) west-southwest. The capital of Kiribati, South Tarawa, lies 1,765 km (1,097 mi) to the west. As of 2015, the population was 20, down from 61 in 2000.

Logical Answer

Wouldn’t that be logical?  Might not those secrets be more important than keeping a full patrol in Chinese waters?  

Wouldn’t it be exceedingly dangerous for a vessel of another power to come upon whatever documents her plane contained? 

Word came once that a message had been received from Miss Earhart, giving her position after she was forced down.  It was some distance north of Howland Island where she was expected to land.  But navy officials must know that this message DID NOT COME FROM MISS EARHART BECAUSE HER RADIO COULD NOT SEND MESSAGES IF IT WAS AFLOAT.  

That both Miss Earhart and Frederick Noonan are dead the world has little doubted.  THE NAVY KNOWS.  There was apparently no sign of either flier when the ship [sic] washed up on the beach of Canton Island.

Whatever happened, whatever information Miss Earhart was carrying back to her government, the world may never know.  But a few people know that Miss Earhart’s craft was found.  And for them the mystery only becomes deeper, less fathomable.  (End of Evening Post story.)

The best the Evening Post could to do identify its source for this potentially world-changing story was to write, “The wireless message was seen by a member of one of the crews who said it was never denied.”  Thus, anyone vaguely familiar with the Earhart disappearance and able to read at a high school level — which should be all readers of this blog — can easily discern the bogus nature of the Canton Island claim.

This story is pure disinformation, rife with innuendo and wild speculation meant to confuse readers, sell papers and, most importantly, further obscure and hide the Marshall Islands-Saipan truth.  Earhart’s Saipan fate was almost certainly known to Navy Intelligence and thus FDR and those closest to him, possibly within the first few months of the fliers’ disappearance — though how this information first came to them remains uncertain.  The story itself tells us the government knew the truth, and it’s so poorly written than its stink is impossible to ignore. 

It was all to no avail, as this particular Earhart propaganda operation was a miserable failure.  The Canton Island claim got no traction, and wasn’t picked up by any other newspapers, books or publications that I’m aware of.  A search of websites for Canton Island has yet to uncover any mention of the idea that the Earhart Electra “washed ashore” there in July 1937, or any other time. 

The story was so transparently bad that FDR’s central planners didn’t dare put in the New York Times or The Washington Post, instead opting for a trial run in the relatively obscure Charleston Evening Post.  Further, a web search for the writer of this travesty, one Norman Arthur, produces zero results, which strongly suggests he never existed. 

Attempting to dig deeper, my sincere, good faith query to the local Charleston librarian who has access to the old Evening Post archives was rudely ignored — frustrating but not unusual in this line of work — but I believe Norman Arthur was a fake name attached to this fake story.  This phony claim ranks among the lowest scrapings in a still-growing 84-year-old trash bin of “Earhart mystery” bilge, and made absolutely no dent in the public consciousness, then or ever.  

Nonetheless, the 1939 Evening Post story is notable, even remarkable, for one important reason.  More than any reports about the disappearance up to that time, just two years after Earhart’s loss, it emphatically demonstrates that the U.S. government was actively engaged in media manipulation, disinformation and propaganda, despite the fact that virtually no one publicly questioned the government’s crashed-and-sank verdict at that time.  The truth was known in the White House, and FDR wasn’t about to let the public know of his perfidy in the Earhart matter, when he abandoned America’s beloved First Lady of Flight, leaving her to the barbaric mercies of the Japanese on Saipan. 

As I wrote in Truth at Last (pages 322-323): 

If the American public had learned of the abandonment of Amelia Earhart— one of the most admired and beloved figures in our history—on Saipan by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1937, his transformation from popular president to national pariah would have been instantaneous, his political future reduced to ashes.  

[*Editor’s note: March 10, 2022 update: The Charleston Library archivist has informed me that the foregoing story, which I was so sure came from the Charleston Evening Post, actually did not.  She performed a thorough search of the paper’s archives to determine that fact, as well as that no record for Norman Arthur existed in the paper or in any Charleston listings in 1939.  I appreciate and accept her findings, and also apologized for my impatience.

This doesn’t change anything else about the story, except to tell us that the Charleston Evening Post is off the hook for committing gross journalistic malpractice, at least in this case.  I’ll keep you updated on any new information that can shed light on who actually was responsible for this travesty.

March 11 update: Woody Rogers replied and said the page he sent came from the Minneapolis Star, sometime in 1939.  I searched the online archives and can’t find the page at this time.  I asked Woody, whose files aren’t available right now, to let us know where the story came from as soon as he can, if possible.]

March 12 update: As requested by Les Kinney, below is the front page of the publication from which the above story came, minus the folio or banner at the top, which normally identifies the newspaper or publication.  The page-wide headline also appears unusual.  We await further developments.

31 responses

  1. I still believe she landed in the Marshall Islands off Barre Island in the Mili Atoll, was picked up by the Japanese and eventually taken to Saipan where the two of them died..that’s where the preponderance of evidence points to.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. William H. Trail | Reply

    Greetings to All:

    The idea that AE and FN were essentially airborne couriers, picking up vital intelligence information and materials along the route of their R-T-W flight that for whatever reason couldn’t be transmitted to Washington any other way, is beyond ridiculous. It wouldn’t even make a good plot line for a paperback spy thriller.

    All best,

    William

    Liked by 1 person

  3. This is a fine example of disinformation. It has only gotten worse over the years!

    Like

  4. This obscure story was interesting to read because it provided a few smiles and laughs while I am still healing from another operation. When serious stories are mutilated this badly, one cannot help but be amused. But at least this faux author is merely a runner-up to the Gillespie fantasy, or is that fauxtasy?

    The 8-paragraph commentary which followed was a Campbell Classic. Mike, how you uncover some of this otherwise “lost” and obscure material is another Earhart “mystery.” No one else in all the world could have done for the Amelia Story what you have been able to accomplish during the last 3 decades.

    Getting to know you, and reading all the material you have published in your Book and on this Blog have become part of my greatest treasures during my long life. For that, I again say, THANK YOU.

    Calvin

    Like

    1. Calvin,

      Thanks so much! Once again your generosity and kindness have made my day, but I can’t take credit for this one. Woody Rogers, whose grandfather was a Marine in the ONI, sent me the Charleston Evening Post story, so thanks and hats off to Woody.

      Good to see you well enough to comment on the blog, and we’ll continue to pray for your fullest recovery.

      God Bless you and Wanda,
      Mike

      Like

  5. This is a GREAT example of early DiSiNfOrMaTiOn at it’s *BEST!

    Doug

    Like

  6. Under the section titled Hypothetical case, in the third sentence, the word flier is misspelled as filer, making me wonder how good this newspaper was on checking it’s stories prior to publication. Never heard the Canton Island piece of the AE story before. Most Americans would probably have a hard time pointing Canton out on a map.

    Like

    1. Thanks Ken, I missed it in my review, so much to check. Not making excuses, however. Appreciate your keen eye.

      MIke

      Like

  7. David Atchason | Reply

    I believe this curious news story had more to do with the clumsy American takeover of Canton Island at a time when the British may have been possessive about their Phoenix Islands. Canton is the biggest and was used as an air base during the war. A B24 crashed there (pilot error) and that played a role in one of Ric’s scenarios at some point. I forget what the story was. I guess Ric missed this article because I think early in his AE theories he didn’t think her plane would float and yet here it is presented as a fact. I don’t know anything about the currents and the prevailing winds so I don’t have any idea if the plane could have floated there from Mili Atoll area. It seems about impossible. Maybe someone at the Evening Post wrote this as a joke just to see what would happen.
    Sincerely,
    David

    Like

    1. Or maybe it was placed there purposely by our government-media Deep State as disinformation and propaganda, just as I took pains to suggest in my article. Can you possibly consider that, or are you always determined to crap all over and find fault with whatever is seriously presented here in good faith?

      MIke

      Like

  8. This is nothing more, than a *SENSATIONAL, first hand scoop, attention grabber. In other words, a splendid fish wrapping. It just amazes me, how this Johnny on the *Spot (whoever wrote this and didn’t bother to put his name to?) could possibly know, what everyone else didn’t? He must have flown in the Electra, alongside Amelia and directed Fred Noonan’s navigational positions and finally crashed landed on this Canton Island.
    Truly *AMAZING and had he attached his name to this article, all the *WISER we would be today or even then. (I want this guy’s autograph!) (lol) I wish, Mike would find more of these articles, just to keep us *ENTERTAINED and filled with LAUGHTER.

    Doug

    Like

  9. David Atchason | Reply

    That was my first reaction to you (disinformation) when you mentioned to me you were going to post this. I didn’t mean any disrespect. I like to look at these stories from every angle. The article seemed pointless as a genuine disinformation piece because it had no legs. What other newspaper picked up on this?

    Now you have me delving into this even further.
    In what form did this Article appear to you? It looks like Woody Rogers (do you personally know this man?) forwarded photocopies of the original article to you and you pasted the photocopies into this blog. But then you continue by writing in your own hand what the article said. Then there is a map which at first appears like it might have been part of the original article, but I see it’s not, Finishing up you insert a photo of Canton Island which also looks like it was part of the original article, but it’s not. It mentions 2020, so I guess that’s when it is from.

    I know I’m sounding picky, which I am, but it’s only for me to try to make sense of this. At first glance, I agree and said so to you, it reeks of disinformation. I was swayed by the statement in the article that 2 weeks later the U.S. took over Canton to the dismay of other nations. But this is not true, according to this article. http://www.yt1ad.info/t31/about_t31.html This settlement should be easily checkable, in 1939 and now. Would the ONI really write disinformation in such an amateur and clumsy manner filled with sophomoric speculation, containing an obvious falsehood? (The resolution of the sovereignty dispute) By any chance did this article appear on April 1, 1939?

    How did Woody Rogers obtain the newspaper to make these copies from? You say you got nothing from the Charleston librarian, yet Woody did, or he has the original newspaper in hand. Where did he get it from? Did he say?

    When I said it had to do with the territorial dispute, it looks like I was talking through my hat. I’m always willing to learn and I have nothing personal at stake here. I hope you don’t take my probing questions here as an attack on your professional expertise. As I said, I’m just trying to make some sense of this, and right now, I’m having difficulty with that.

    Sincerely,
    David

    Like

    1. Dave,

      I’ve just been informed by the Charleston Archives librarian that the page in question did not come from the Charleston Evening News, so you were correct in questioning the provenance of this story, and I was a bit too hasty in saying that it did.

      I’ve asked Woody if he knows where the page came from, but since he didn’t identify it when he sent it, I can’t imagine that he knew it provenance either. At this point we’re back to square one. I’ll update the story with this new information and hope we can eventually locate the source of this story.

      Mike

      Like

      1. David Atchason

        Mike,
        Just to add to the confusion, it dawned on me that the small city I lived in for 26 years, Salem, Mass. had the Salem Evening News since 1880. As far as I know it is still going strong. The way you presented the story with what looked liked photocopies of three different pages of one article can’t be right, the pictures are obviously from 3 different articles. Did Woody send them to you like that? It’s not absolutely inconceivable that the article is right, after all identifying HER plane might be more tricky than thought. What if she did switch planes in Miami as Safford claims?
        Also, the trade winds blow from the EAST in that area which would mean her floating plane had to blow in from east of Canton I. which seems somewhat unlikely.
        Sincerely,
        David

        Like

      2. Dave,

        Woody did not send me the story in pieces. I had one full front page with the Earhart story in one column at far right, with the photo taking up two columns, with the story continuing on another inside page. I simple cut the story up into pieces so that I could present it all together without having to include all the other unrelated stories. I can’t put the page into the comments here, wordpress doesn’t not allow images in comments, but will forward the page to you.

        The Charleston archivist suggested the page might have come from some kind of tabloid magazine, and though it’s possible, to me it looks far more like a newspaper format. One possibility is the Milwaukee Evening Post, which published in 1939-1940, and I’ll try to find someone who can look into this, but no luck yet.

        Otherwise everything about the story is the same, as I wrote in my update. I await word from Woody but do not expect him to know where the story came from, or he would have told me when he sent it.

        Mike

        Like

  10. Leslie G Kinney | Reply

    Woody Rogers is a great purveyor of misinformation. Why not ask him where he got this article. I doubt you will get a straight answer. Mike, you could do your part by posting a PDF or jpeg of the entire page or article for inspection.

    The story itself is wrought with errors. It’s not a credible piece of journalism as you have suggested.

    Lastly, I can’t figure out where the article ends, and your commentary begins.

    Les Kinney

    Like

    1. Les,

      I always write, “End of story” in parens when I run stories direct from sources, and I did so this time. I also indent the content, as is called for by normal AP or Chicago Style. Woody has now said the story came from the Minneapolis Star in 1939, but I can’t find it on a cursory archives search which is available. They want money for more availability, and I’m not crazy about that idea.

      As you ask, I will present the entire page at the bottom of the post.

      Thanks for your lucid input.

      MIke

      Like

  11. I enjoyed reading this article or the historical accounting of it. It’s funny to think of the Electra washing up on a beach, as if it could float like a boat. It’s already assumed Amelia & Fred are dead. The wireless message was seen by a crew member, but who was he? The extensive Pacific search was July 1937? ( you would think, the newspaper would know, it was July 1937 and not ended the sentence with a question mark?) This *Norman Arthur of the Evening Post/Minneapolis Star, he doesn’t have the facts; although he presents the readers with tantalizing or second hand information. Had I lived at this time and read this article; I probably would have swallowed this hook, line and sinker. This newspaper account displays, the infancy of Amelia Earhart’s disappearance and quest for answers. It’s quite *interesting & humorous to take in, at this very future date & time.

    *Thanks Mike, I got a kick out of this article and all the comments.

    Doug

    Like

  12. Leslie G Kinney | Reply

    Mike, put on your journalistic cap and study the page itself. In my opinion, the type is awkward, lines not even, the headline “Pacific” is slanted upward. The whole page is skewed.

    With that said, the various articles did in fact appear in one form or another in the mainstream press albeit without the elaborate makeover from late 1938 through the spring of 1939: i.e., Capone, Movita, “New York hicks,” etc. I could find no reference whatsoever to the Earhart Canton Island tale. As you already discovered, there doesn’t seem to be a journalist from that period with a name “Norman Arthur.”

    The paper’s name is conveniently absent. Woody is holding back again. He has the full page – he’s just not giving you the provenance.

    Although the story itself is full of holes, i.e., location of Pacific fleet, priceless scientific instruments, Canton Island occupation dates, etc., (Canton was occupied at the time by young colonists from Hawaii with ham radios) the reference to the “terse note send in code” is intriguing. It doesn’t take long for rumors, scuttlebutt, and innuendo to be tossed back with little resemblance to original message. In this case, Amelia and Fred crash landing on a beach at Mili Atoll.

    Who knows? Maybe an OP 20-G radio operator leaked what he heard from another location at another time.

    Les Kinney

    Like

    1. Les,

      Are you seriously ready to give any bit of this story any credibility? Your last sentence suggests that possibility.

      I’ve told you that Woody said the story came from the Minneapolis Star in 1939. He says he’s in transit now and can’t get to his files, but he knows I want to see the full page so we can put this annoying bedbug to rest. Whether we ever will is another question.

      Look closely at the page. If this isn’t a legit page from some kind of publication, and is in fact a compendium and a creation, then someone of more ability that Woody or anyone here did it. No, it’s not a forged page, some of the lines and heads appear “skewed,” as you say because it was scanned and saved improperly, probably by substandard equipment. You can also see, at the top, a hint of the folio section, which should never have been excluded from the page’s presentation. If you want to cut, you cut from the bottom. Of course this is all my opinion, and like you, I want to see the full view as soon as possible. I’m not holding my breath, of course.

      MIke

      Like

    2. The page does look odd; when you have a headline at the top of the page, doesn’t the lead story column typically appear on the left side of the page. And is it the front page? You don’t usually see full span headlines in the following pages.

      Like

      1. I agree, Tom, and that’s why we need to see the full, original page. Woody says his stuff is packed for his move to Vancouver, but I emphasized to him that his page has created a bit of a fuss on this blog. We need to see the original. Who knows if and when we ever will. I’ll be more careful next time Woody — or anyone — sends me something odd.

        MIke

        Like

  13. Leslie G Kinney | Reply

    The Minneapolis Star Tribune was and still is a credible newspaper. You won’t find this page in their 1938 or 39 archives, and no, I’m not suggesting the Canton beach landing occurred. Far from it. I thought I made that clear. I am suggesting there could be a grain of truth to Navy radio OP-20 G operators receiving a coded message that Earhart’s plane had crashed landed on a beach – just not Canton.

    Les Kinney

    Like

    1. Les,

      OP-20 operators could well have heard anything, and probably did at one time or another. This possibility still doesn’t make anything in the story remotely plausible. The story uses the terms “washed ashore” in the cutline and the “discovery of the $80,000 airplane, beached on Canton Island …” in the main story. There’s nothing about a plane “crash landing” in this story. “Washing ashore” is highly suggestive of the plane floating for some indeterminate distance before it reached the beach, which makes the story even more extremely unlikely, especially since we know, or have at least a 99 percent certitude, that it crash-landed off Barre Island, Mili Atoll.

      The very poor writer or writers who put this bad propaganda together probably had a great time ginning up all the wild speculation that made this crap so enjoyable for the average reader — then and even now, when you compare it to some of the blather we’ve seen from TIGHAR over 30-plus years.

      MIke

      Like

  14. Mike, you refer to us readers as achieving a high school level which I have at least, but the journalist Norman Arthur seems to be a little short of that. I had trouble discerning where hypothetical ended and reality began. What jumped out at me at this reading though, was him using the term “forced down.” The article makes no reference to the lost and crashed and sank paradigm which is in itself remarkable. He mentions “some distance north of Howland I.” which could conceivably have been Mili Atoll. He asserts the plane was “floating” but doesn’t explain how he knows that.

    When Dick Spink searched for pieces of her plane I thought he was doing that on a sandy beach, at least that’s how I pictured it. But Jororo? witnessed them getting into their yellow life raft. So the plane could have been floating in the lagoon, or near one of the Endriken Islands. I’m not sure what to make of this discrepancy. Would Amelia, upon being “forced down” have made a water landing or would she have chosen sand, or coral? Of course, in my view, the plane could not have physically floated to Canton I. from Mili as it would have been going against prevailing wind and current.

    I have a funny feeling that Mr. Arthur knew exactly what happened to Amelia and Fred and he can’t help but reveal that in his clumsy way. It looks like he was assigned to discredit the true story, but then we still have the mystery of where this story ever appeared to have its intended effect.
    Sincerely,
    David

    Like

    1. Dave,

      Since we have not been able to ID Norman Arthur as a real person, it’s entirely possible that he represents the U.S. government-media disinformation machine, which in fact represented FDR and friends, who as I said almost certainly knew what happened to Earhart and Noonan by 1939, if not much sooner. Whoever actually wrote the story was likely simply following directions from a higher source that he wouldn’t dream of questioning.

      Mike

      Like

  15. William H. Trail | Reply

    Greetings to All:

    For what it’s worth, I’m estimating that the article in question was published some time in early January 1939. I deduced this by checking the news snippet just to the left of the AE article announcing the recent marriage of screen actress “Movita” (Maria Luisa Castaneda) to Irish singer-boxer Joseph Alphonsus Doyle. They were married on 5 January 1939. Source: Internet Movie Database (IMDb.)

    By the way, 1 January 1939 was the date that AE was declared legally dead.

    All best,

    William

    Like

    1. William,

      Terrific insight … and typical William Trail.

      Thanks.

      Calvin

      Like

      1. William H. Trail

        Calvin,

        Thank you, Sir.

        Respectfully,

        William

        Like

  16. David Atchason | Reply

    William,

    Thanks for dating the news that appears on this copy. But didn’t Les Kinney just write that no such page appears in the Star-Tribune in that time period? Les, did you mean that the complete page didn’t appear or just the part about Amelia?

    To keep myself busy I looked up the report of the US Navy search for Amelia. I was directed to a copy of the report in the US Archives. Unfortunately it is photocopies of typewritten pages and the clarity is too low for me to read any of it. However, one of the first pages is the copy of a letter sent by a woman, I believe, but again the clarity is too low to read it. I wonder what she said? Do I need to make a trip to Washington?

    So I turned to the TIGHAR records, and they have an interesting account of all radio messages sent (apparently) by Amelia. Nothing new here, but somewhere in the report is a message that says Amelia has been found and is expected to be picked up by a Japanese boat tomorrow. I suppose, at that time, no one would find it especially odd that such a rescue would happen. That’s all the report says, no elaboration on why a Japanese boat would be in the Phoenix Islands, if that’s what the report meant. So, when I read in this blog, that no Japanese ship would dare show up in Phoenix Islands waters in those days, I wonder if that’s true?

    So I wonder if, as I suggested, the story was written by a writer with full knowledge of the AE story who is directed to thoroughly confuse the public with a wacko version?

    David

    Like

    1. William H. Trail | Reply

      David,

      You are correct. Les wrote, “The Minneapolis Star-Tribune was and still is a credible newspaper. You won’t find this page in their 1938 or 39 archives…” I’m not disputing that. The fact is, until further information is developed, or Woody Rogers provides the provenance, we are unable to positively identify the publication (most likely a newspaper given the look of it) in which the AE article appears.

      All best,

      William

      Like

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