Tag Archives: AEMMI

Castro, AEMMI donate Earhart books to HPO

Readers of this blog are familiar with the efforts of Marie S. Castro and the Amelia Earhart Memorial Monument Inc. (AEMMI) to establish a permanent memorial to Earhart and Fred Noonan on Saipan, as well as the less-than-encouraging progress they’ve made since the formation of the AEMMI in September 2017.  Although the Marianas Variety and Saipan TV have supported the AEMMI movement with several stories about Marie and her wealth of Earhart-related experience, the vast majority of the citizens of Saipan remain overwhelmingly opposed to the Earhart Memorial Monument.

Marie Castro, replete with her fashionable “Amelia Earhart Died on Saipan” T-shirt, recites the litany of great Earhart disappearance books that will be available to all on Saipan via the CNMI HPO.

What appears to be a small step forward occurred on Feb. 9, when Marie and several members of the AEMMI gathered at the offices of the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas (CNMI) Historic Preservation Office at Saipan’s Springs Plaza in Gualo Rai to make a charitable donation of several extremely important books that present many aspects of the truth in the Amelia Earhart saga so that local readers can learn the truth for themselves.

Saipan TV’s Ashley McDowell was on hand to chronicle the brief event for local viewers, and interviewed Marie about the AEMMI’s donation to the CNMI Historic Preservation Office of the seven best books ever written (in my opinion) that present various aspects of the truth about the disappearance of Amelia Earhart. 

“This is valuable material that is going into the archives of the Historic Preservation [Office], and this is for anybody who would like to know more about the story on Saipan in 1937,” Marie told McDowell.

Marie then formally read the names and authors of the seven books that will be available in the HPO archives, and presented the AEMMI official HPO resolution to HPO Director Rita Chong.  Most are Earhart disappearance classics familiar to anyone with even a casual interest in the Earhart story.

AEMMI Vice President Frances Sablan (standing at left) and other members of the AEMMI and CNMI Historic Preservation Office gather at the CNMI Historic Preservation Office Feb. 9.

Chronologically, these books are Paul Briand Jr.’s Daughter of the Sky (1960), Fred Goerner’s The Search for Amelia Earhart (1966); Vincent V. Loomis’ Amelia Earhart: The Final Story (1985); Thomas E. Devine’s Eyewitness: The Amelia Earhart Incident (1987);  Marie S. Castro’s Without a Penny in My Pocket (2013); Amelia Earhart: The Truth at Last (2nd Ed. 2016), by Mike Campbell; and Marie Castro: My Life and Amelia Earhart’s Saipan Legacy (2019) by Mike Campbell with Marie S.C. Castro. 

“Castro says she hopes these books will give insight to anyone questioning Earhart’s story in 1937 on Saipan,” McDowell said.  To watch the Saipan TV video, please click here and go to 13:45.

Better late than never, the Marianas Variety followed with a story and photo by Bryan Manabat on Feb. 16, Amelia Earhart books donated to Historic Preservation Office.”  

Marie Castro, right, presents the AEMMI resolution, which states in part, “WHEREAS, these are valuable documented history accounts as told by our elders and these seven books are intended to be used as reference today and for generations to come,” to HPO Director Rita Chong.

Manabat’s story presented some powerful quotes from Marie,, including these:

Castro believes that there is “undeniable evidence that Amelia Earhart and her navigator Fred Noonan were on Saipan. Earhart’s plane was seen in a Japanese hangar at the Aslito Airfield on Saipan and a Marine, Robert E. Wallack, discovered Earhart’s briefcase in a blown safe on Saipan shortly after the island was declared secure on July 9, 1944.”

Castro pointed out, “Three high-ranking military officials — Gen. Alexander A. Vandegrift, Gen. Graves B. Erskine and Adm. Chester W. Nimitz, the Pacific commander-in-chief during WWII and the last of the Navy’s 5-star admirals — came to the same conclusion that Amelia Earhart had been on Saipan.”

“So we have the responsibility to keep and honor this part of our history, as recorded in these books,” Castro said.

From the Marianas Variety: “Local author Marie Castro, second left, with Sen. Edith DeLeon Guerrero, Rep. Leila Staffler, Historic Preservation Officer Rita Chong and Rep. Denita Yangetmai.”

Soon another opportunity for Marie and the AEMMI to bring their Earhart Memorial Monument proposal to public attention looms.  The 5th Marianas History Conference, co-organized by the University of Guam, Northern Marianas College, Northern Marianas Humanities Council, Humanities Guåhan, Guampedia, and Guam Preservation Trust, will be held virtually [via Zoom] from Feb. 19-26, 2021 and will feature on-site venues in the CNMI and Guam for select, conference-related events and presentations.  

Marie will present her Earhart story to the conference on Feb. 26.  Please stay tuned.

July 24, ’20: Happy 123rd Birthday, Amelia!

Today’s post is an extension of my July 11 article, as we recognize, if not celebrate, another Amelia Earhart birthday, her 123rd.  I can’t imagine that America’s First Lady of Flight would still be with us at 123, even in a perfect world, though the chances are excellent that she would have reached the century mark had fate not so cruelly intervened. 

Amelia came from hardy genes indeed, if her mother and sister were any indications.  Grace Muriel Earhart Morrissey, of West Medford, Massachusetts, two-and-a-half-years younger than Amelia, died in her sleep on March 2, 1998 at the age of 98.  Amy Otis Earhart was born in 1869 and died in 1962 at 93.  Amelia’s father, Edwin, was an entirely different story, dying at 63 in 1930.  Reportedly he liked his booze, and his longevity genes, or lack of them, likely weren’t dominant in Amelia, nor with Muriel.  Thanks to Edwin, Amelia was a devoted teetotaler.    

In Boston in late June 1932, Amelia and her mother, Amy Otis Earhart, enjoy the acclaim that her May 23, 1932 solo Atlantic crossing bestowed, when she became the first woman and second person to accomplish the feat, at a reception attended by the mayor and other luminaries.  In the background, not easily seen, is Amelia’s Lockheed Vega, in which she overflew the Atlantic, landing in a field in Londonderry, Ireland. 

So we pause again to pay our respects to this truly great American, regardless of the fact that nothing positive in Amelia’s cause has happened during the past year, at least media-wise.  For more background, I invite you to see “July 2, 2018: 81 years of lies in the Earhart case;AE’s last flight anniversary arrives without change(July 2, 2019); last year’s July 24 post, For Amelia Earhart, it’s Happy Birthday No. 122!or my recent July 11 post, July 2020: Earhart forgotten amid nation’s chaos.

As usual, one has to go a long way to find any mention of Amelia’s 123rd birthday in the media — all the way to Saipan, in fact, where the indomitable Marie S. Castro, 87, and her long-suffering friends of the Amelia Earhart Memorial Monument Inc. (AEMMI) group did their best to put on good faces behind the masks they were forced wear at the Northern Marianas Museum, where they had a little party for Amelia today.

On May 23, 1932, after a harrowing flight featuring violent storms, icy conditions and a damaged exhaust manifold, Amelia was forced to land her Lockheed Vega in a pasture near Londonderry, Ireland, 200 miles north of her original target in the British Isles.  “After scaring most of the cows in the neighborhood,” she said, “I pulled up in a farmer’s back yard.”  Amelia became the first woman to fly the Atlantic solo and only the second person in history to accomplish the feat.  Amelia Earhart’s star was ascendant.

Earlier this week, reporter Sophia Perez of the Marianas Variety announced today’s modest festivities with a July 21 story, Amelia Earhart birthday to be celebrated at NMI Museum.” 

According to the event’s chair . . . committee board member Remi Sablan, Perez wrote, the celebration is open to the public and will offer guests the opportunity to check out the NMI [Northern Mariana Islands] Museum’s new additions to its Amelia Earhart exhibit, including photos and testimonies of three key witnesses who claim to have seen Earhart on Saipan shortly after her Lockheed Model 10 Electra disappeared in the Central Pacific en route to Howland Island.” 

Saipan TV’s KSPN2 News also did a small piece on the AEMMI event, as reporter Ashley McDowell briefly interviewed Vice President Frances Sablan before turning to the group’s beating heart, Marie, now its official president, for a few words.  McDowell, whose tone tells us that she’s no supporter of the truth, makes sure viewers understand that Amelia’s disappearance remains “a mystery.”  She emphasizes the “M” word more than once, lest she also be classified among the true believers, better known to establishment types as conspiracy nuts, and worse.  Even so, Saipan TV does more for the truth in its coverage of the AEMMI’s Earhart birthday event than everyone else in any media, anywhere, where only crickets can be heard. 

To view the KSPN2 video, please click here.

AEMMI President Marie S. Castro, center right, Vice President and Acting Secretary Frances Sablan, to Marie’s immediate left (our viewpoint), and other members of the AEMMI celebrate Amelia Earhart’s 123rd Birthday at the Northern Marianas Museum on Saipan July 24. 

I want to thank a very special person, Mike Campbell, author of Amelia Earhart: The Truth at Last who has become my driving force in this worthy cause, who became my mentor and adviser,Marie wrote in a July 19 email.  His continued support gave me the great courage along the rough and sometimes apparently hopeless road ahead.

I decided to commit myself and organized a group called the Amelia Earhart Memorial Monument, AEMMI in 2017, she continued.  “With courage I followed my gut, walking through the unknown for a long overdue worthy cause of Amelia Earhart, to honor the sacrifice of this brave woman and her navigator Fred Noonan and for her valuable and indelible connection on Saipan.”

Please consider contributing to this extremely worthy cause.  I should remind everyone who reads this why the Amelia Earhart Memorial Monument is so strongly opposed, both on Saipan and by the American establishment: Those who hate the truth know that if the monument is ever erected on Saipan, it would be a major step closer to eventual U.S. government disclosure of the awful facts that we know so well.  The memorial monument’s success is 100 percent dependent on private donations, and everyone who gives will receive a personal letter of appreciation from AEMMI President Marie S. Castro. 

In any event, Happy Birthday, Amelia!

AE’s last flight anniversary arrives without change

Another anniversary of Amelia Earhart’s last flight is upon us, this one the 82nd, and once again we have nothing but lies and silence from our media.

Instead of absolutely nothing, I awoke to an email from a faithful reader informing me of the latest propaganda broadside from our reliably dishonest establishment, this one from National Geographic.  Predictably titled, “Missing: The Unsolved Mystery of Amelia Earhart’s last flight,” it’s exactly what we’ve come to expect: more absurd genuflecting to TIGHAR’s falsehoods and delusions.  Here are the two sentences that National Geographic spared for the truth:

Some believe that Earhart and Noonan, flew north, toward the Marshall Islands, where they crashed and were captured by Japan, who controlled that area.  Eyewitnesses claimed to have seen Earhart in a prison camp on Saipan, but physical evidence supporting their testimony is scarce.

Prison camp?  Where did this never-before-heard red herring come from, if not from the mendacious mind of a National Geographic writer or editor?  They also made sure to include another loser, the infamous, thoroughly discredited ONI photo from the July 2017 History Channel disinformation operation, apparently to ensure that their clueless readers remain as ignorant and misinformed as they did before they began reading the article. It’s pathetic and worse than nothing.  Better silence and dead air than more of the same old lies after 82 years.

Members and officers of the Amelia Earhart Memorial Monument Committee gather at Saipan’s Fiesta Resort & Spa July 2.  From left, Allen K. Castro, technologist; Herman Cabrera, architect; Ambrose Bennett, member;  Ed Williams, member; Oscar Camacho, site planning;, Avelyna Yamagata, member; President Marie S. Castro; Carlos A. Shoda, member; Evelyna E. Shoda, secretary;  Vice President Frances M. Sablan.

Only on Saipan and in the Marianas Variety can we find any semblance of truth and hope in the Earhart caseOn July 1, the local newspaper published “Committee to commemorate anniversary of Amelia Earhart’s disappearance” by reporter Junhan B. Todiño, who has consistently supported the good cause.  Todiño’s story begins:

THE Amelia Earhart Memorial Monument Committee will meet on Tuesday to commemorate the 82nd anniversary of the famous aviator’s disappearance while attempting to make a circumnavigational flight of the globe.

Committee president Marie S. C. Castro said members and friends of the memorial monument committee will meet at Fiesta Resort & Spa.

She said they are hoping that their friends on the U.S. mainland could join their meeting at least in spirit as we honor the memory of the two great aviators, referring to Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan.

Mike Campbell, author of “Amelia Earhart: The Truth at Last,” told Castro in an email: “I truly believe Amelia and Fred know and appreciate the love and respect you’ve given them throughout your life and especially in these past few years.”

He added,Whether or not we succeed in our goal of erecting a memorial monument to Amelia and Fred on Saipan — and if we are not, it won’t be because you have not done everything in your power.

To read the rest of the story, please click here.

Of course the comments at the bottom of the story, as always, reflect the militantly ignorant status of most of the benighted population of Saipan.  Ambrose Bennett came to me before we all departed and encouraged me not to by bothered by the negative comments,” Marie wrote in a July 1 email.

On July 2, Marie told me, “Mike, I plan to dedicate the month of July to put piece by piece of the AE story if possible two or three times a week what happened here on Saipan in 1937.  This is one way of educating the locals.”

Hope springs eternal, even in the disappearance of Amelia Earhart.

 

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