Tag Archives: Daily Mail

Recent Earhart stories aim to confuse and deceive

Ten days ago, an annoying, unserious story about the disappearance of Amelia Earhart, Chamorro man shares Earhart theory that she was a prisoner on Saipan,” appeared in the Pacific Daily News, headquartered on Guam and now “part of the USA Today Network,” which only means its editorial policies will ape the corrupt U.S. establishment line more than ever.  This particular piece leaves no doubt about that.

As I will demonstrate by dissecting this disingenuous mix of misinformation and muddled rhetoric by Pacific Daily News reporter Jerick Sablan, this article was not produced with any intention of supporting or corroborating the facts in the Earhart case.  When the story is read by the uninformed, which is nearly everyone, only confusion will result, which is its goal. 

Garapan Prison 5

The smaller of the two Garapan prison cell blocks, often reserved for “special” prisoners and females, according to some reports, where several witnesses reported that Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan were held after their arrival on Saipan in July 1937. (Courtesy Tony Gochar.)

Soon after the story’s Nov. 25 publication, USA Today ran a dressed-up version with a slightly more cynical title, Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan were prisoners on Saipan and killed, according to uncle’s tale.”  I shouldn’t need to tell anyone of the negative connotations inherent in any account that’s described as a “tale” in a headline.  This is an immediate “tell” from USA Today that you don’t need to take this story seriously, because they certainly don’t.

The article follows a typical template for Earhart propaganda, created not to educate, but to confuse and deceive the ignorant into believing that the Earhart disappearance remains among the pantheon of the 20th century’s greatest mysteries, an eternal enigma that will never be solved.  Sadly, most fail to grasp the fact that this is the purpose of virtually every Earhart-disappearance story in the American media, and every other information organization in the modern world, for that matter.  Only here can you be confident you’re getting the truth, from someone who’s devoted 30 years to the Earhart saga, who recognizes this ubiquitous propaganda as well as the precious truth when he sees it.

In the Pacific Daily News story, Jerick Sablan writes that William “Bill” Sablan (relationship not clear) said his uncle, “Tun Akin Tuho, worked at the prison [Garapan] where Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan were taken prisoner in Saipan.”  What jumps out immediately is that Tun Akin Tuho has never been mentioned in any known Earhart literature before now.  Why not?

Why doesn’t Jerick make any reference to the many known and documented Saipan witnesses, so that Bill Sablan’s uncle might have a historical leg to stand on, so to speak?  He could have named people like Jesús Bacha Salas, who saw Amelia in Garapan prison for a few hours; Josépa Reyes Sablan, of Chalan Kanoa, who saw two white people taken into the military police headquarters in Garapan; Dr. Manual Aldan, the Saipanese dentist who was told by Japanese officers the name of the American woman flier in custody, “EARHARTO!”; José Rios Camacho, who saw the fliers shortly after their arrival at Saipan’s Tanapag Harbor; or any of the rest of Fred Goerner’s original 13 witnesses — and these are just those Goerner identified during the first of his four investigations on Saipan before The Search for Amelia Earhart was published in 1966. 

Father Sylvan Conover with eyewitness Jesús Bacha Salas, a Chamorro farmer who was held at Garapan Prison between 1937 and 1944 for fighting with a Japanese soldier. Fred Goerner reported that “sometime during 1937 a white woman was placed in the next cell [beside Salas], but kept there only a few hours. He saw the woman only once but gave a description of her that fitted those given by the other witnesses. The guards told him the woman was an American pilot the Japanese had captured.” (Photo by Fred Goerner, Courtesy Lance Goerner.)

Jerick does none of that, but grudgingly writes, “According to news files, in 1960 a CBS radio man, Fred Goerner, spoke with at least a dozen reliable witnesses from Saipan, who shared that before the war, two white people arrived on Saipan — described as ‘fliers’ or ‘spies’ — and they were held in the Japanese jail.”  Could a reporter assigned to write a story about the Earhart case really be this uninformed, especially one based in Guam, a stone’s throw away from Saipan, where the presence and death of Amelia Earhart in the pre-war years has become a part of the culture, an accepted historical fact among its elder Chamorros?

Fred Goerner was far more than a CBS radio man; he was the author of The Search for Amelia Earhart, the only bestseller in the history of Earhart disappearance literature, and is generally recognized among those without agendas as history’s greatest Earhart researcher, which Jerick also neglects to mention.  I’d ask Jerick why he gives such short shrift to Goerner, if I didn’t already know the answer. 

In fact, Goerner claimed he identified 39 eyewitnesses to Earhart’s presence on Saipan; all independently picked her photo out of a selection of about 10 similar-looking women.  But in acknowledging Goerner, if only in a minimal way, Jerick departs from the worst of the false Earhart paradigms, such as the hundreds, if not thousands of insufferable TIGHAR infomercials posing as news stories we’ve been subjected to for 30 years.  In these, any mention of Earhart in the Marshalls or Saipan is immediately branded “folklore” or “conspiracy theory,” shoved into the circular file and never mentioned again.

Jerick seems in a great hurry to direct readers to his main point, the July 9 abomination that the History Channel perpetrated on the public in a transparent attempt to discredit the truth.  “The History Channel shared the theory that the two were taken prisoner in a recent TV special called “Amelia Earhart: The Lost Evidence,” Jerick tells us, signaling that his story is little more than a weak attempt to keep the History Channel’s lies about the phony ONI photo viable enough to qualify for a few more advertising dollars in reruns. 

The amorphous figure (left), we are told by History Channel and the fanatics who actually believe this drivel, is actually Amelia Earhart, right.  This ridiculous comparison is most illustrative of the insanity that has prevailed in the recent Earhart propaganda exercise, which some in the media and others refuse to let go.

“According to USA Today,” Jerick continues, bringing in the Pacific Daily News parent company without explanation, “the theory shared by History’s TV special says Earhart was captured and executed on Saipan by the Empire of Japan.  The U.S. government and military knew it (and even found and exhumed her body).  And both governments have been lying about it ever since.”

That’s it in a nutshell, but instead of recognizing or at least supporting the truth by respecting it as a likely scenario based on the huge amount of accumulated evidence, or something similar, Jerick reverts to the age-old establishment default position and defines the truth as a mere theory.  He then compounds this misnomer by attributing this theory to USA Today and the History Channel, as if they just discovered the Earhart story.  If the truth must be referenced as theory, why doesn’t he cite any of the host of investigations and books that have advanced this theory, in order that this theory might have more substance and relevance?  As always, even when an aspect of the truth is presented in the media, it comes wrapped in so much flotsam and jetsam that its effect becomes minimized and obscured, which is the goal from the jump.

Soon after learning about the July 5 NBC News promotion of the forthcoming History Channel special, as glaring an example of “fake news” as you will ever see, its premise predicated upon and completely tied to the false claims about the ONI photo, I was the first to denounce it the same day with this post: July 9 Earhart special to feature bogus photo claims.

After watching “Amelia Earhart: The Lost Evidence,” I concluded that it possessed many of the hallmarks of a classic disinformation operation.  “’The Lost Evidence’ is a wolf in sheep’s clothing,” I wrote, “a masterpiece of deceit, cleverly designed to discredit the long-established facts that reveal the truth about Earhart and Fred Noonan’s landing at Mili Atoll and deaths on Saipan at the hands of the prewar Japanese. . . . The onslaught of activity from the leaders of our fake news brigade that preceded the July 9 airing is all we need to tell us that a massive propaganda operation was under way, and remains so.”

For the entire review, posted July 12, please see  History’s ‘Amelia Earhart: The Lost Evidence’: Underhanded attack on the Marshalls-Saipan truth.

David Martin at the grave of James V. Forrestal, our first secretary of defense,  at Arlington, Va.  No one has done more to prove that Forrestal was murdered by unknown killers on May 22, 1949.  See DCDave.com for an extensive anthology of news commentary in the true history of many of this nation’s sacred cows. (Courtesy David Martin.)

I wasn’t alone in my assessment of the History Channel’s propaganda drillLongtime news analyst David Martin (www.DCDave.com), author of the definitive work in the James V. Forrestal murder case (“Who Killed James Forrestal?”), and countless other commentaries that the mainstream media despise and will never acknowledge, soon joined the fray.

“For three-quarters of a century America’s press and its court historians have studiously ignored the voluminous evidence that aviation adventurer Amelia Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, were captured by the Japanese and did not just mysteriously crash into the Pacific Ocean on her round-the-world venture,” Martin wrote in his July 7 commentary, Press Touts Dubious Earhart Photo.  “Now, across the board, from NBC, CBS, ABC, Fox, CNN, to The Washington Post and the Associated Press, they all seem to have made a 180-degree turn based upon the supposed discovery of one very ambiguous photograph in the National Archives.  What, we have to wonder, is going on?

The New York Times, jumping the gun with its more skeptical approach, gives us a very big clue,” Martin went on.  “The headline says it all, ‘Did Amelia Earhart Survive? A Found Photo Offers a Theory, but No Proof.’ Already, The Times is beginning to cast doubt upon the significance, if not the authenticity, of this photograph.”  For the rest of Martin’s July 7 analysis, please click here.

Soon the shaky edifice built by the History Channel’s mendacity began to crumble, as the foundation of the entire production, the undated ONI photo of Jaluit Harbor, came under assault.  The British publication, The Guardian, reported that a Japanese blogger had found the exact same photo in what was described as “an old Japanese travel book” that was published in 1935 — two years before the ONI photo of History Channel infamy was said to have been snapped.

“See the sleight of hand?” Martin wrote in his July 13 commentary, Earhart photo story apparently debunked.  The debunking of this photo does nothing whatsoever to undermine the little bit of good evidence that the History Channel presented for the flyers having been captured by the Japanese, much less the cornucopia of evidence that Mike Campbell has assembled in his book Amelia Earhart: The Truth at Last.  That evidence remains as strong as it was before the program—with its big press build-up—ever aired.”  I posted my agreement, As usual, Dave Martin sees the truth in Earhart story,” later that same day. 

A rarely seen photo of Amelia Earhart after her landing at Calcutta, India, on June 17, 1937, during her doomed world flight.  The next day, Amelia and Fred Noonan departed Calcutta en route to Rangoon, Burma. After a fuel stop at Akyab, Burma, she and Fred Noonan continued on their way, but monsoon rains forced them to return to Akyab.

Indeed, Jerick Sablan writes that the “History TV special theory rests on an ambiguous photograph, said to have been taken in 1937, that might show Earhart and Noonan alive on a dock in the Marshall Islands.  At the time the islands were controlled by Japan.”  But History’s special theory had no staying power, because, According to USA Today,Jerick tells us,a Japanese military history blogger Kota Yamano undermined a new theory that Amelia Earhart survived a crash in the Pacific Ocean during her historic attempted around-the-world flight in 1937.”  New theory?

Jerick’s description of the ONI photo as “ambiguous” is a blatant euphemism, a weasel way of saying the photo is worthless, as anyone not affiliated with a politicized media organization can see.  It also developed  that this Kota Yamano blogger person doesn’t appear to exist except as a convenient prop, as neither he nor his blog shows up in any online search as discrete entities.  Regardless, the entire media herd happily jumped on the bandwagon immediately after The Guardian story broke, as if they were waiting for the green light to publish anything that would taint and discredit, simply by association, the hated Marshalls-Saipan scenario promoted by the “The Lost Evidence” in several segments it presented that were unrelated to the ONI photo.

If that weren’t enough, four days after The Guardian’s July 11 report  on the Japanese blogger’s alleged findings that seemingly debunked the History Channel’s claims, the Republic of the Marshall Islands issued a statement though its ministry of foreign affairs that appeared to “debunk the debunker.”  According to the Marshallese government, the Jabor Dock, which it confirmed was the location of the photo, was built in 1936, not 1935, as the mysterious blogger Kota Yamano asserted Further compounding the mess, the Marshallese statement did not specify when the photo was taken, which left the door open to the possibility that the American fliers could be in it, at least in the minds the extremely credulous and anyone associated with the History Channel.

The Marshallese release changed nothing about the ONI photo itself, which remains what it always has been, a reflection of Jaluit harbor and the Jabor Dock at some unspecified time, with the Koshu in the right background and a small group of unidentifiable people standing around  — nothing more, nothing less. What was notable about the Marshallese statement was that nobody in the media paid any attention to it, which tells those of us who can discern the obvious what we already knew — the media does not want the photo to represent the presence of Earhart and Noonan at Jaluitfor reasons that I’ve explained ad nauseam.

This is the undated ONI photo seen in the July 9, 2017 History Channel presentation, “Amelia Earhart: The Lost Files,” upon which some in the media have recently attempted to re-focus our attention.  The ship in the right background is said to be the Japanese survey ship Koshu; neither Amelia Earhart, Fred Noonan nor anyone else of note is remotely identifiable.

I didn’t learn about the Marshalls statement until a few weeks later, when an interested reader, having found it on Rich Martini’s website, sent it to me.  I posted my take on what had become little more than a tedious soap opera on July 28:  Marshalls release is latest twist in photo travesty,”

Getting back to Jerick Sablan’s Pacific Daily News story: If you had any doubts about the real reason it was written, his closing statement, or “telling point” as it was called at the military journalism school I attended in 1978, should clear up any misconceptions.  “The mystery surrounding her disappearance continues to keep her memory alive and remains one of history’s greatest mysteries,” Jerick is compelled to remind us, as if we might overlook his tawdry story’s raison d’être.  Question for Jerick: What is the point of presenting Bill Sablan’s uncle Tun Akin Tuho, who “worked at the prison where Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan were taken prisoner in Saipan,” if the fate of Amelia Earhart is going to remain such an irresolvable mystery? 

I wrote an email to Jerick, welcoming him to the Earhart story, telling him a bit about my own 30 years of study and work on the subject.  Just as the truth in the Earhart matter is NO mystery,” I wrote, “there are also no “THEORIES” about her fate. We have the truth that Earhart and Fred Noonan died on Saipan sometime after crash-landing at Mili Atoll on July 2, 1937, and we have two major LIES — that she crashed and sank, or the ridiculous Nikumaroro “hypothesis,” which have been promoted to the status of theories and perpetuated as such in order to protect the obvious truth that anyone can discover for themselves by reading Amelia Earhart: The Truth at Last or the handful of books that preceded it and presented various aspects of the truth, including The Search for Amelia Earhart, Fred Goerner’s 1966 bestseller. . . . The U.S. government has known since 1937 exactly what happened to Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan, and continues to go to great lengths though its media toadies to deny and obfuscate the truth, which is available to anyone who seeks it in the few places where it’s available, which sadly do not include the PDN or USA Today.”

Jerick did not reply to my message, so he’s clearly part of the problem, not the solution in the Earhart matter, as are virtually all of his media counterparts. 

The day after the Pacific Daily News-USA Today story hit the streets, the UK’s Daily Mail ran its own, fancied-up version, replete with several large, blown-up photos in UK tabloid style with three reporters’ bylines.  The Nov. 26 story, “Amelia Earhart ‘was executed by the Japanese’: New ‘witness’ account claims aviation pioneer was held in Saipan before being killed – and the US military collected her body and covered it up,” surpasses its progenitors, if only because it features a photo of the original Saipan eyewitness, Josephine Blanco Akiyama, and a passing reference to Fred Goerner’s work.

Josephine Blanco, far right, Saipan, circa 1946. It was Josephine’s childhood memory of seeing Amelia Earhart’s arrival at Tanapag Harbor as told to Dr. Casimir Sheft, left, when she worked for the Navy dentist on Saipan that ignited the true modern search for Amelia Earhart.  (Photo courtesy Josephine Blanco Akiyama.)

The Daily Mail is no stranger to the Earhart story.  Its recent coverage has not been as deceptive or negative in its approach to the truth as its overseas counterparts, and it seems more unconcerned with protecting the American establishment’s sacred cows.  In 2015 the Daily Mail published three pieces about Dick Spink’s Mili Atoll investigations, on May 29, June 26 and July 9.

Those are the positive aspects of the Daily Mail’s Earhart work, but this bunch suffers from some serious shortcomings too, and the rest of the story isn’t so pretty.  In my July 17, 2015 commentary, Daily Mail sets new ‘standard’ in Earhart reporting,” I pointed out the “glaring lack of references to any previous investigative work on the Earhart disappearance as related to Mili Atoll. To the low-information reader, it appears as if the Daily Mail discovered this story all by itself, and is presenting it to the world for the first time! . . .  [T]he way the Daily Mail has presented these stories is too disturbing for me take much satisfaction.”

In its  Nov. 26 story, the Daily Mail, continuing its policy of non-attribution, refused to ascribe Josephine’s original account to Goerner, Paul Briand Jr., and Linwood Day of the San Mateo Times, foremost among those in the early 1960s who brought Josephine’s account to the world, and implied, though did not outright state, that NBC News had just discovered her story:  “And in July, Josephine Blanco Akiyama, who grew up on Saipan but now lives in California, said she saw the pair as a child,” the Daily Mail reported. “ ‘I didn’t even know it’s a woman, I thought it’s a man, Akiyama told NBC’s Today that month.

In its favor, the Daily Mail quoted me for the first time ever, writing that “another recognized Earhart investigator, Mike Campbell, has lashed out at what he described as ‘bogus photo claims,’ ” but they wouldn’t call me a blogger or an author, or name Amelia Earhart: The Truth at Last, fearing they might lose a few readers who might actually leave their page and seek more details elsewhere.  At least the Daily Mail had the decency to spare us the “one of history’s greatest mysteries” closing line.  You can read the story and judge for yourself what the Daily Mail’s real agenda is by clicking here.

Much of media’s newly feigned interest in Amelia Earhart’s Marshalls and Saipan presence can be traced to the July 9 History Channel’s residual influence; after all, some legitimate witness accounts were presented, though none in any depth.  Some in the media are becoming more aware that the hated truth is being sought by more people than ever — though we’re decades away from any popular uprising that would force government disclosure, if it ever happens at all.   Thus these dishonest practitioners of deception are trying harder than ever to discredit the truth by planting phony stories and then undermining them, using two of Dave Martin’s Seventeen Techniques for Truth Suppression,Knock down straw men” and “Come half clean.”  They’re playing with fire.

(Editor’s note: Some readers may not agree with the views expressed in this commentary.  If so, you are invited to send your comments, as is everyone. The moderator reserves the right to decide whether incoherent or hostile messages will be posted.)

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June 2: Gillespie and TIGHAR — Again

Two months have passed since I posted an entry on this virtually invisible blog, where only a scant few intrepid souls dare to tread. Just as I was beginning to wonder why we haven’t lately heard from Ric Gillespie and TIGHAR (which has also become an acronym for deceit and misdirection in the Earhart disappearance), they turn up in the headlines once again, like the bad pennies they are.

Apparently it took nearly a full year before Gillespie could conjure up a new reason to fleece the unwary and justify yet another trip back to  godforsaken Nikumaroro Atoll, where he insists he can find Amelia Earhart’s Electra, if only he’s given enough OPM (other people’s money). How many times have we seen this despicable song and dance? I’ve lost count.

 “Amelia Earhart’s Plane Revealed in Sonar?” Discovery News asks its uninformed  readers to consider in its May 29 edition. “A grainy sonar image captured off an uninhabited tropical island in the southwestern Pacific republic of Kiribati might represent the remains of the Electra, the two-engine aircraft legendary aviator Amelia Earhart was piloting when she vanished on July 2, 1937 in a record attempt to fly around the world at the equator,” Discovery News reporter Rossella Lorenzi writes.

 Released by The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR), which has long been investigating Earhart’s last, fateful flight, the images show an “anomaly” resting at the depth of about 600 feet in the waters off Nikumaroro island, some 350 miles southeast of Earhart’s target destination, Howland Island.

… “We currently project that it will take nearly $3,000,000 to put together an expedition that can do what needs to be done. It’s a lot of money, but it’s a small price to pay for finding Amelia,” Gillespie said.

Loathe to miss another golden opportunity to keep its readers across the pond as stupid as possible, the UK’s Daily Mail echoed the Discovery News story two days later in its Mail Online edition, asking “Is this Amelia Earhart’s plane? Sonar image from uninhabited Pacific island could show remains of aviator’s aircraft Electra that disappeared in 1937.”  The extensive high-tech photo and graphic layouts in both articles are hugely overdone, as if both publications are trying to force-feed Gillespie’s latest red herring to their readers.  For anyone remotely informed about the Earhart matter, to label these stories and Gillespie’s claims utterly ridiculous is an exercise in abject understatement.

Pouring gasoline on a roaring fire of mendacity, Lorenzi reports that a “number of artifacts recovered by TIGHAR during 10 expeditions have suggested that Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, made a forced landing on the island’s smooth, flat coral reef.”  What Lorenzi fails to tell readers is that NONE of the artifacts Gillespie has dug up on the trampled-over island has ever been connected to Earhart or Fred Noonan, her navigator, that hundreds of U.S. Coast Guard LORAN Station personnel and Gilbertese settlers lived on Nikumaroro for over 20 years between 1940 and the early 1960s, and that the media’s continuing embrace of Gillespie’s third-hand, long-debunked theory is pure disinformation, meant to keep the public ignorant about the facts in the Earhart matter.

This time Gillespie wants $3 million to seek out the source of this “sonar” hit or whatever. It’s getting very difficult to read this crap anymore. With Gillespie, TIGHAR and their media accomplices, it’s just the same hag dressed up in different clothes. What it does show, beyond a doubt, is how alive and well the Earhart cover-up is, and how heavily invested the establishment is in keeping the masses in the dark about the truth. 

No observers in their right minds would give Gillespie a dime after 10 trips to Nikumaroro and nothing to show for it, so why would an objective media, without an agenda, spend two lines in promoting Gillespie’s constant failures?  Once again, Gillespie has proven Amelia Earhart was never on Nikumaroro, and once again, he’s going to be rewarded for it with a fat payday. Don’t ask me where I think the money to fund these unending Pacific cruises comes from.

The Mail Online article saved the worst for last, dismissing the truth in two sentences, which actually is more than most news organizations will spend. “A few theorists reckon that she Earhart was spying on Japan and had been captured and executed,” the unnamed Daily Mail reporter wrorte. “This theory has been discounted by the American authorities and press.” Just WHY American authorities and the press have discounted this “theory,” of course, is not mentioned, nor is the location of Earhart and Noonan’s deaths — SAIPAN.

 If you’re curious, and you’ve somehow stumbled upon this blog, I suggest that the truth about these and other questions about the so-called “Earhart Mystery” can be found in my book, Amelia Earhart: The Truth at Last.

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