Tag Archives: Les Kinney

July 9 Earhart special to feature bogus photo claims

On Wednesday morning, July 5, I awoke to the long-anticipated news that an unclassified photo found at the National Archives in College Park, Md., by researcher Les Kinney that reflected Jaluit Harbor in the Marshall Islands, date possibly late 1930s but not known, would indeed be the centerpiece of the History Channel’s July 9 special, Amelia Earhart: The Lost Evidence.”  NBC News apparently had the TV network news exclusive on this story, but others were soon also breathlessly touting the photo, as if it were truly the Holy Grail in the Earhart case.  To see the initial NBC video and story, please click here.

This would be great news if the claim that Amelia Earhart, Fred Noonan and the Earhart Electra are in the photo were true, because we know that the doomed fliers were in the Marshalls, were taken to Jaluit and later to Kwajalein and Saipan, where they died in Japanese hands.  Several researchers and authors, whose work can be easily found on this site, have presented mountains of evidence to this effect.  But this photo isn’t “evidence” of anything except that Koshu was at Jaluit Harbor (large ship in right background) when it was taken, and might have had an unidentifiable airplane on its stern.   Interesting, but hardly what our “experts” are telling us.  In fact, this photo does little except discredit the truth, which, in my view, is the goal of this current exercise, along with ratings and making money, of course.

This is the photo of Jaluit Harbor, possibly circa 1930s, put forward by Les Kinney, Morningstar Entertainment, the History Channel and their confederates as the smoking gun in the Earhart case.  It is noteworthy only in that these claims are among the most ridiculous in the history of Earhart research, even surpassing some of the incredible whoppers we’ve heard from Ric Gillespie of TIGHAR.  The question we should ask is why this photo, and why now?  Stay tuned to this space for answers to these and other small “mysteries” in the Earhart case. 

Earhart and Noonan are absolutely not in the photo, and it’s incredible that anyone could believe they are.  Zoom in and you can see the upper half of a white man with black hair on the far left of the group on the dock.  Kinney and anexpertsay it’s Noonan, but the features, the nose, the hairline are all wrong, and any intelligent analysis rules him out.  The so-called experts are either incompetent or lying, and we all know that some paid experts will say anything.  Nobody in the photo remotely resembles Earhart, inasmuch as anyone’s facial features can be determined at all.

Furthermore, where are the Japanese military personnel who would have been close and in control of the American spies after their pickup at Mili Atoll?  Where is the tension one would expect in such a photo?  It simply doesn’t exist; the group on the dock appears to be out for a Sunday stroll, or awaiting someone’s arrival from one of the ships in the harbor.  None of it computes, unless one understands what the real game is here, and even this olfactorily challenged writer can smell a rat when it stinks this badly.

Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence; this photo offers none and fails completely.  Does anyone except Les Kinney really think that Earhart and Noonan are in this photo?  This photo will be totally rejected by virtually everyone who knows what Amelia and Fred Noonan looked like, and its use on this program will do nothing except to discredit the truth as we know it.  Our ideological enemies — and we all know who they are — will label its proponents as delusional fanatics.

I will have much more to say about the odious claims being made about this photo, as well as other irresponsible assertions that will also be advanced by the History Channel on July 9.  I’ll post my review following the airing of “Amelia Earhart: The Lost Evidence.” 

New Mili search uncovers more potential evidence

Earhart researchers Dick Spink and Les Kinney, who led a search team sponsored by Parker Aerospace, returned from Mili Atoll in the Marshall Islands Jan. 30 after spending five days combing the tiny Endriken Islands near Barre Island with high-tech equipment including ground-penetrating radar and metal detectors.

Although no one has made any more claims that “concrete proof or a Holy Grail has been found, the pair didn’t return empty-handed either, and some of the artifacts appear to have serious potential.

“Wow, what a trip!” Spink wrote in an email Feb. 3.  “Two of the pieces we found are very consistent with what I found on my first couple expeditions to Mili.  One piece in particular is some type of identification plate that is consistent in size with that of a Lockheed airframe tag.  There is no way of knowing this until we get it to the lab, but you can tell it was some type of ID tag.

Dick Spink stands at what he believes was the exact spot that Amelia Earhart landed her Electra on July 2, 1937. Spink and a search team returned to the area for a five-day search of the tiny Endriken Islands in late January.

Dick Spink stands at what he believes is the spot where Amelia Earhart landed her Electra on July 2, 1937.  Spink, Les Kinney and a search team returned to the area for a five-day search of the tiny Endriken Islands in late January.

Something important to note, Spink continued, is that all of the aluminum pieces we found were in a direct line between where [I believe] the [Earhart] plane came to rest and the location of where the plane was loaded onto the shallow draft barge.  Very interesting indeed, and the foundation of this story is becoming more solid.

Readers unfamiliar with the full background on this story and the new search at Mili for parts of Amelia Earhart’s Electra can find details in my three earlier posts, Yahoo! News announces new search for Electra parts, Recent find on Mili Atoll called “Concrete proof and Update to Recent find on Mili story.”

“We found six small artifacts that could or could not have come from the Electra,” Kinney wrote in a Jan. 29 email.  “We also found a couple of small unidentified pieces of aluminum, and a round one inch diameter rusted magnet.  Most of this stuff was buried — all except one piece were found by metal detectors.” 

Kinney urged caution about making any premature announcements until thorough testing can be done.  He will coordinate the tests, financed by Parker Aerospace and conducted as soon as possible.  None of the tests will likely provide absolute proof that an artifact came from the Earhart plane, but Kinney, Spink and antique aircraft expert Jim Hayton all believe the aluminum plate and airwheel dust cover found by Spink in previous trips to the Endrikens were probably from the Electra.

Kinney also interviewed some native Marshallese he called “knowledgeable locals” in the Mili Atoll area, and says he “confirmed there were no aircraft wrecks on any of the nearby islands stretching out for at least ten miles” during or before the war years, with only one exception.  This supports his earlier research, and makes the possibilities even stronger that one or more of the artifacts’ came from the Earhart plane.

We also got some Japanese aircraft samples we picked up on Mili Island to compare the aluminum we got from our island, Kinney wrote, adding thateverything has been cleared by the Marshallese government.  I wrote up a release and the President signed it as well as the Historic Preservation Office Manager.  Everything is legal.

As has usually been the case when Earhart searches are undertaken by TIGHAR, Nauticos and others, the media has enthusiastically informed the public about the great adventure.  These same news agencies have invariably failed to publish follow-ups when the searches fail to deliver.  Much the same is the case here, though on a far smaller scale; nothing about the search has been published to date by Yahoo! News or any other media outlet, though Spink says he will be talking to a local newspaper soon, and other possible media exposure may be forthcoming.

Readers of this blog can be sure that this reporter will do all that he can to keep them informed about any news in what might be properly called the postmodern search for Amelia Earhart.  

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