Tag Archives: U.S. Navy

Goerner’s ’68 appeal to House members, conclusion

We continue with the conclusion of Fred Goerner’s July 1968 presentation to a group of Republican House members, which was, inexplicably, chaired by Kentucky Governor Louie Broady Nunn.

During his four-page presentation, “Crisis in Credibility—Truth in Government,” Goerner succinctly laid out the facts that revealed the presence and deaths of Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan that he’d found during his four investigative forays to Saipan during the early 1960s, a remarkable story that made The Search for Amelia Earhart a bestseller.  Goerner did his all he could to win the assembled Congressmen, most of whose names remain unknown, to the cause of securing justice for the doomed fliers.  It remains the closest thing to a fair hearing the truth in the Earhart disappearance has ever received by a U.S. government group of any kind. 

We continue with Fred Goerner’s transcript:

With a copy of that memorandum in hand, I polled the members of the Government information Subcommittee, and found shock and disbelief.  Not one of the Congressmen or any member of their staffs had communicated or even intimated such an attitude to the Navy Department.  The Honorable Donald Rumsfeld of Illinois and The Honorable John E. Moss of California, Chairman of the Committee, vowed to get an answer.

Donald Rumsfeld, now 88 and retired, served as Secretary of Defense from 1975 to 1977 under Gerald Ford, and again from January 2001 to December 2006 under George W. Bush.  He is both the youngest and the second-oldest person to have served as Secretary of Defense.  He also knew much about Fred Goerner’s work on the Earhart case, and was intimately involved with 9-11, another Big Lie and sacred cow in America’s history.  

Three months ago the matter reached a confrontation in the office of the Secretary of the Navy where apologies were issued to me and to the members of the Government Information Subcommittee and the offending memorandum was withdrawn from the file.  During the process two Navy officers accused each other of being the source of the wretched character assassination.

How and why such a spurious document reached the head of a file being declassified after thirty years for the edification of my fellow journalists still has not been explained.  I am now considering a legal suit to be filed in Federal District Court in San Francisco to determine that fact.

But what of the justice of truth for Miss Earhart and Captain Noonan.  At this moment two high-ranking former military officers and two highly-placed civilians (the names are in the hands of Congressman Rumsfeld) stand ready to reveal the truth if long-standing security restrictions which bind them can be removed.  In spite of this testimony, the Navy Department maintains there are NO restrictions; however, the Navy’s cognizant authority will not issue a letter to that effect to free the men.   Why such deception after thirty-one years?  What possibly about Earhart and Noonan could be that important?

The following quote is from a man who a dozen years ago served in one of the highest and most responsible positions in this country/is top intelligence gathering department: “It was well known within high ranking intelligence circles that Miss Earhart, at the time of her disappearances was under government instructions to fly over and observe suspected Japanese military developments in the islands of the Pacific.  There were some serious blunders made by the Navy in their attempt to provide Miss Earhart with proper guidance following the completion of her observations and the Navy was determined to conceal their participation and failure in this part of the operation.  The concealment of errors is congenital with the armed services and particularly so in connection with any covert type of operation such as this was.  The mission was not specifically for the United States Navy, but rather was ordered at the request of the highest echelons in the government.”

Fred Goerner, right, with the talk show host Art Linkletter, circa 1966, shortly before the establishment media, beginning with Time magazine, turned on Goerner and panned his findings, telling readers, in essence, “Move along, Sheeple, nothing to see here.”

In other words, when the full truth regarding Earhart and Noonan is known, a new view of the administration of Franklin Delano Roosevelt in the years before Pearl Harbor will emerge.

Should that be classified because of national security?  I believe not.

I would like to ask you to make the obtaining of justice for Miss Earhart and Captain Noonan the business of the Republican Party this year, but I will not be that foolish.  I do ask, however, (The Scripps League of Newspapers joins me) that the Republican platform reflect a constructive concern for the American public’s right to know.

Listen to our youngsters cry, Tell it like it is.”  They have seen our hypocrisies and they want better from us.  There is a great yearning in our country for a clean, emancipating wind of truth.  And the political party that first fully realizes that fact will, in the vernacular, have it made!  Continually one hears today the question, “What has happened to patriotism in America?”

Trust, belief and confidence are at the heart of patriotism, and those American strengths have been severely shaken in recent years by literally hundreds of incidents of news manipulation, deception, double-talking and double-dealing by the executive branch of our government.  The spirit of patriotism must be restored in this country, but it cannot be rekindled by propaganda or simply by telling Americans they should be patriotic because it’s the thing to do.  It will only be regenerated when Americans are convinced their government is making every effort to truthfully inform them in every area of national concern and when they once again believe their national leaders are pursuing with dedication the principles of human behavior upon which the Constitution of The United States was created.

Foul! many will cry.  My God, what about secrets of state and national security.  If we have to tell everything we know, you might as well hand the country over to our enemies.

Nonsense,  is the answer to that.

Two men who knew plenty more than they ever revealed about the fate of Amelia Earhart: Secretary of the Interior Henry Mogenthau, Jr. (left) and President Franklin D. Roosevelt, in 1934. Neither man ever revealed his knowledge nor was called to account for his role in the Earhart disappearance, her death on Saipan or the subsequent cover-up that continues to this day.

The protection of information vital to national security must be maintained.  What must be eliminated is the temptation to use “national security” as a cover to manipulate facts or hide information in the interest of vague political and diplomatic pragmatisms which are intended to protect individuals or organizations from the consequences of responsibility.

What can be done to diminish the gap and improve relations between government and the public?

Increase the purview and investigatory ability and authority of the Foreign Relations and Government  Information Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations of The House of Representatives.

Insure [sic] by legislation that control of that Committee always remains in the hands of the Minority,  so the ability to investigate cannot be frustrated by partisanship.  Plug the loopholes in the Freedom of Information law by establishing a board with a representation of security-cleared journalists who can determine what is and is not being served by the label, national security.

(These suggestions and many more are contained in a new book titled, CRISIS IN CREDIBILITY, written by Bruce Ladd, Jr., of Washington, D.C.  It should be read by every person who seeks public office.)

My appearance before this committee is a clear tribute to the degree of freedom we enjoy in America and I am grateful.  The best way we can protect that freedom is to make sure we are told the truth.  All of it.

Thank you.  (End of Goerner presentation.)

Goerner’s riveting presentation to the lawmakers produced nothing of significance; the sacred cow was sacrosanct, then and now.  None of his suggestions were ever acted upon and the serious allegations he made about the Navy’s key role in Earhart’s alleged secret mission remain unproven but quite possible.  

First of four-part 1964 Argosy magazine special: Fred Goerner pledges “I’ll Find Amelia Earhart”

Today we remain in Fred Goerner’s mid-1960s heydays, a few years before the The Search for Amelia Earhart became a bestseller in 1966 and just as Goerner had departed for his fourth visit to Saipan.  From the January 1964 issue of the now-defunct Argosy (“For Men”) magazine, we present “I’ll Find Amelia Earhart,” which, to my knowledge, is the first of just two nationally published accounts of Fred Goerner’s early 1960s investigations on Saipan, this one covering his first three trips, from 1960 to 1962.  A few years later,  the September 1966 issue of True magazine published a long preview of the soon-to-be-published Search.  (Boldface emphasis mine throughout.)

This photo, taken sometime after Amelia Earhart’s June 1928 arrival in Burry Port, Wales, after becoming the first woman to fly the Atlantic, with Wilmer “Bill” Stutz and Louis E. “Slim Gordon” in the tri-motored Fokker monoplane Friendship, set the tone for Fred Goerner’s first-person narrative, “I’ll Find Amelia Earhart.”  Goerner’s lengthy piece highlighted Argosy magazine’s January 1964 issue, but it was not the cover story. (Photo by UPI.)

I found this story only recently; I think, but am not entirely certain, that it’s Goerner’s earliest published national account of his Earhart investigations.  The story reflects his passion for the truth and determination to succeed against the increasingly trenchant stonewalling policies of the U.S. government he was beginning to experience, as the feds circled their wagons around another sacred cow.  At this stage of his research, Goerner had yet to fully understand the true nature of the forces arrayed against him.  Once again, just as in my last post, you are invited to compare the below story with the mendacious, ridiculous fare about the Earhart mysterywe’re force-fed today, as the U.S. government-media Earhart disinformation machine continues to click on all cylinders, and more people than ever are ignorant about the facts. 

As I always try to do with original material, I’m reproducing this article as it appeared in Argosy as closely as possible, using the same photos and cutlines and editing only for mistakes that would distract.  Because of the its length, I’ll present “I’ll Find Amelia Earhart” in four segments.  Forthwith is Part I, as we return to January 1964.  

 

“I’LL FIND AMELIA EARHART!” Continued from page 25

before the war and were taken to Saipan by the Japanese.

•  A United States Naval Manpower Division Expert, who says, “The fliers, according to the Marshallese  natives, were taken away on a Japanese ship – presumably to Saipan.”

•  One of the most respected natives in the Marshall Islands, who backs up the stories of both: “The Japanese were amazed that one of the flyers was a woman.”

•  A former U.S. Naval Commandant of Saipan, who states: The testimony of the Saipanese people cannot be refuted.  An ONI man was there, and regardless of what they tell you in Washington, the story couldn’t be shaken.  A white man and woman were undoubtedly brought to Saipan before the war.  Quite probably they were Earhart and Noonan.  I don’t believe they flew their plane in here.  They were brought by the Japanese from the Marshalls.  I think you’ll find the radio logs of four U.S. logistics vessels will prove that.

•  A series of strange discrepancies appearing in the official logs of the Coast Guard Cutter Itasca, Earhart’s homing vessel at Howland Island in 1937, and the U.S.S. Lexington, the Navy carrier dispatched to search for her and Fred.

•  Literally hundreds of bits of information, none of which have been satisfactorily answered by official sources, that point directly to the Saipan conclusion.

•  A strong feeling that Earhart and Noonan may be the key that will make public the truth behind one of the most incredible and least-known periods in United States Military Intelligence history – the twenty years that led to Pearl Harbor.

The evidence is so great that, as you read this, I will once more be on Saipan.  This is the fourth expedition in as many years, and this trip may well provide the final answer we have so diligently sought.

For me, it began in April 1960, with Josephine Blanco Akiyama of San Mateo, California.  The San Mateo Times had printed a series of articles in which Mrs. Akiyama was quoted as having seen “two white people, a man and a woman, flyers, on Saipan in Japanese custody in 1937.”

From Fred Goerner’s January 1964 Argosy story, here’s the original caption: “Workers sift earth at Saipan grave believed to have been burial site of Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan.  Teeth and pieces of skulls were found, but identification was inconclusive.”  (Photo by Fred Goerner.)

More than a little skeptical, I called her to ask why she had been late in making the story public.

I told about it a long time ago,was her reply.  I told a Navy dentist I worked for on Saipan in nineteen forty-five.

The Navy dentist turned out to be Casimir Sheft, now in civilian practice in Passaic, New Jersey.  Sheft didn’t know that Mrs. Akiyama had come to the United States, but he did back up her story.

I tried to do something about it, said Sheft, but the naval officers I discussed it with didn’t seem interested in starting an investigation.  I felt sure Washington knew about it anyway, so, when I returned to the States after the war, I forgot about it.

The possibility of corroborative testimony seemed to me to be sufficient to warrant an expedition to Saipan.  There was a ring of truth to the stories of both Mrs. Akiyama and Dr. Sheft, and it seemed logical to assume that if Josephine Akiyama, as a young girl, had learned about “two white flyers,” there must be others still alive on that island who knew something.

Permission to visit Saipan wasn’t easy to obtain.  At first, it was denied, then, after various appeals, the Navy Department relented.  Early in June 1960, I left for the Marianas.  I paused at Guam for clearance and Navy transportation to Saipan, and the aura of secrecy was deepened when naval officials told me that, on Saipan, I was to behave myself and if I were a member of the military.

From the air, Saipan, a twelve-by-five-mile dot, appears to be a tropical paradise.  On the ground, the impression is entirely different.  Scene of some of the most brutal fighting of World War II, Saipan still shows the scars.  The rusting hulks of tanks and landing craft are scattered on her reefs, and the shattered superstructures of sunken Japanese ships protrude above the surface of her harbors.  The jungles have covered the craters and foxholes, but in a day’s time, enough live ammunition to start a small revolution can still be collected.

In the 1944 invasion, the United States forces suffered more than 15,000 casualties.  The cost to Japan and the natives was even more dear.  Twenty-nine [thousand] of 30,000 Japanese troops and an estimated half the native population were killed.

The cloak-and-dagger atmosphere was not dispelled at Saipan.  Immediately after landing, Commander Paul Bridwell, head of the Naval Administration Unit, whisked me to his quarters overlooking Tanapag Harbor, and spelled out some basic rules for my behavior while on the island.  I was not to go further north on Saipan than the administration area, and under no circumstances, was I to go over to the east side of the island.

What’s this all about, Commander?” I asked.  “What does this have to do with the Earhart investigation?

Not a thing,” was the answer.  Are you sure you’re here about Amelia Earhart?

Of course I am,” I answered.  “What else?  Why all the secrecy?  Why can’t I visit other parts of the island?

A lot of questions,” replied Bridwell, but I’m afraid I can’t give you any answers.  Just confine yourself to the area I’ve indicated and we’ll get along fine.”

Also from Fred Goerner’s 1964 Argosy story, the original cutline read: “This is jail where witnesses say ‘American woman flyer’ was held by Japanese on Saipan before the war.  Reports generally agree that she died or was executed by her captors.”  (Photo by Fred Goerner.)

You know about the bull and the red flag?  Well, that’s how such a conversation affects a newsman.  But I decided I had come on the Earhart story, and on the Earhart story I would work.

It’s an understatement to say that it’s difficult to conduct an investigation when half the territory is denied you, but Bridwell was very anxious to be of help.  He gave me the names of some ten natives who should know if Earhart and Noonan were on the island.”  He personally led me to the natives and, to a man, they knew nothing.  They were not only vague about everything before the war, I began to get the feeling I was listening to a phonograph record.

It was then I enlisted the aid of Monsignor Oscar Calvo, Father Arnold Bendowske and Father Sylvan Conover of the Catholic Church Mission at Chalan Kanoa.  Nearly all of the 8,000 Chamorros and Carolinian natives who inhabit Saipan today embrace Catholicism.  Monsignor Calvo, a native of Guam, Father Sylvan of Brooklyn, New York, and Father Arnold of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, had not been on the island before the war.  A Spanish Jesuit priest and a lay brother had operated the mission under the Japanese.  Father Tardio returned to Saipan after the war, where he died.  Brother Gregorio is stationed at the church mission at Yap.

Monsignor Calvo told me that the natives I had been led to by Commander Bridwell all worked for the Navy or a mysterious entity known only as NTTU, that inhabited the parts of Saipan I was not to visit, under penalty of no one knew what.  Monsignor and the two priests had heard vague rumors about some white people held on the island before the war, but had not done any probing.  They were glad, however, to help if they could.

I first laid some ground rules for the questioning:  We would not ask people if they remembered the two white flyers captured by the Japanese before the war.  We would first talk about recent years, then the period of the war, and finally pre-war Saipan.  At a likely moment, Monsignor Calvo would ask, “Did you ever see or know of any white people on the island before the war?”  If the reply was no, the questioning would be dropped.  If the answer was affirmative, we would try to determine if a firm identification and a definite year could be established.

Here, I am going to lump together all the testimony gathered during the three trips, 1960, 1961 and 1962.  In questioning nearly a thousand Saipanese, Monsignor Calvo, the fathers and I turned up twenty-three witnesses, and this is their story:

Two white flyers, a man and a woman, arrived at Tanapag Harbor in 1937.  The woman had very closely cut hair, and at first, appeared to be a man.  They were brought ashore in a Japanese launch and taken by command car into the city of Garapan to military headquarters.  (Garapan was completely destroyed during the 1944 invasion.)  After a period of time in the building, the pair was separated.  The man, who had some kind of a bandage around his head, was taken to the military police barracks stockade at Punta Muchot, while the woman was placed in a cell at Garapan Prison.  Shortly thereafter, probably after a few hours, the woman was taken from the prison back into Garapan to a hotel which served as a detention center for certain political prisoners.

The woman was kept at the hotel for a period of from six to eight months.  Allowed a brief period of exercise each day in the yard, she was constantly kept under guard.  After the aforementioned six to eight months, the woman died of dysentery.  She was buried a day or so later, just outside a native cemetery near Garapan, in an unmarked grave.  The man who had come to the island with her was taken with the woman’s body to the graveside, beheaded and buried with her.  The Japanese said several times that the two had been American flyers spying on Japan.

This photo is taken not from the Argosy story, but from The Search for Amelia Earhart, but it fits well here.  The original cutline reads: “On Saipan during the author’s 1960 expedition, left to right: native witnesses William Guerrero Reyes and Joseppa Reyes Sablan, Fred Goerner, Monsignor Oscar Calvo, and Rev. Father Arnold Bendowske of Saipan Catholic mission. Author’s Photo.”  (Courtesy Lance Goerner.)

Who are these witnesses?  Men who worked for the Japanese at the Tanapag naval base; men and women who lived in Garapan near the Japanese military police headquarters; a native laundress who served the Japanese officers, and many times washed “the white lady’s clothes.  In the beginning, she wore man’s clothes,” says this witness; a woman whose father supplied the black cloth in which the white woman was buried; a dentist who worked on the Japanese officers and heard what they said about the two American flyers; a woman who worked at the Japanese crematorium near the small cemetery and saw the man being taken to his execution, along with the woman who was already dead; a man who was imprisoned at Garapan prison by the Japanese from 1936 to 1944, and who saw the woman the Japanese called “flyer-spy.”

Are you sure they are telling the truth?I asked Monsignor Calvo.

I’m certain,he replied.  In the first place, these simple people couldn’t concoct a story like this.  They come from different parts of the island.  There would be immediate discrepancies.  I’m a native myself, and I know when a lie is being told.  Finally, they have no reason for telling a lie.  Nothing has been paid to them.  What can they gain?

Another question was logical:  Why haven’t these people come forward before?

Why should they? Monsignor questioned back.  If you knew these people’s history, you wouldn’t wonder.  They have never had self-determination.  The Spanish conquered them first, then the Germans.  The Japanese forced the Germans out in nineteen-fourteen, and used the island for their own purposes until the American invasion.  The Japanese had so convinced the Saipanese that your forces would torture them if they were captured, that whole families committed suicide by throwing themselves off Marpi Cliff.  Now you have a United Nations trust over Saipan, and they aren’t convinced you are going to stay.  Two white people on Saipan before the war are of no interest to them.  Why should they have told something that might have reflected badly on them?”

As we gathered testimony about the two flyers resembling Earhart and Noonan, a few tidbits about NTTU also came to light.  NTTU, I learned stood for Naval Technical Training Unit.  High wire fences surrounded the restricted area.  Aircraft were landing at Kagman Field on the east side of the island in the dead of night.  Large buses with shades drawn were regularly seen shuttling between the airfield and the jungle.  There were a large number of American and civilian and military personnel within the restricted area, and they were seldom seen on the south end of the island.  One native said he’d seen Chinese, presumably soldiers, moving through the jungle inside the restricted area. (End of Part I.)

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