Monthly Archives: August, 2012

August 25: Media update

I hope the radio programs I’ve recently appeared on aren’t as unpopular or unknown as this blog appears to be, or I am truly spinning my wheels. On Aug. 5 I was on the Firebase Network Veterans Hour on the Stardust Radio Network with host Rick Townsend, and Deanna Spignola invited me on to talk to her for two hours Aug. 20 on her daily program, “Spignola Speaks,” on the Republic Broadcasting Network.

Both went as well as could be expected, having last done radio in the mid-1980s. It was good practice for my Sept. 4 date with Phil Williams of Knoxville’s WOKI 98.7 FM, likely the top afternoon-drive show here, and a real opportunity for a breakthrough. I never thought he would actually schedule me, but I finally got the official invite on Friday. Will be on Firebase again tomorrow night for an hour.

Joel Freedman is doing great work on behalf of Truth at Last.  He placed a letter to the editor of The Banner Independent, of Booneville, Mississippi, in the same Prentiss County neighborhood as smaller Baldwyn, where Earskin Nabers lived most of his life, and where he died in 2006 at 82.  Freedman’s letter ran at the top of the Opinion section on August 16.

After stating his belief that Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan “were captured and tortured by the Japanese” and died on Saipan, Freedman wrote that he was “impressed by Campbell’s account of the importance of World War II Marine Corps veteran Erskine Nabers in finding the truth about Earhart. … “Campbell describes Nabers as ‘a soft-spoken, low-key individual, content in his quiet life of work and devotion to family in the obscurity of small-town Mississippi.’

Campbell explains, ‘As a radio message code clerk in the communications center of the 8th Marine Regiment on Saipan in July 1944, Nabers decoded the top-secret message announcing the discovery of Amelia Earhart’s Electra in a hangar at Aslito Field. … “After his death,” Freedman continued, “I can almost imagine Nabers’ spirit was greeted by the spirits of Earhart and Noonan, who thanked him for his courage and honesty, on their behalf. When I read a good book, I often learn about people I wish I had met during their lifetime. Earskin Nabers is one of these people.”

Advertisements

August 11: Dave Martin to the rescue

Just when it seemed things couldn’t get worse for Truth at Last — poor sales, no media reviews, no interest, no visitors to the site or blog — on Aug. 8, Dave Martin (www.dcdave.com) put up a 4,000-word review of the book on his site.  Titled “Hillary Clinton and the Amelia Earhart Cover-up,” it’s an excellent overview of the book, and includes a reference to the odious Hillary’s connection to the ongoing government lies and propaganda, and quotes longtime New York Times Washington correspondent Turner Catledge, who wrote that President Franklin D. Roosevelt “was a consummate manipulator, a man who misled, deceived, lied outright when it was necessary to gain his ends.”  

We still can’t be certain that FDR sent Amelia on a mission to “get lost” in the Marshall Islands, and thus knew the Japanese had her in 1937, or whether he didn’t know until much later, possibly as late as June 1944, when the Earhart plane was discovered on Saipan by U.S. military forces.  A researcher told me that at the National Archives in College Park, Md.,  he found large gaps in the records of U.S. radio listening stations that were active in the Pacific area in 1937, stations that would have intercepted and later decoded Japanese transmissions that might have indicated their capture of Earhart and Fred Noonan.

Several years ago Robert Stinnett, author of Day of Deciet: The Truth about FDR and Pearl Harbor (2001), told me in an email that “the Earhart story of 1937 involving naval intercepts would be in the[communications intelligence radio] Station H [Heeia,Oahu, Hawaii] Monthly Reports for July 1937, et al, possibly also in Station Baker, Guam and Station Victor, American Samoa.” Stinett said he saw nothing about Earhart in any of the previously classified World War II material he claimed he forced NARA into releasing to the public through three Freedom of Information Act requests.

Dave Martin is an erudite, veteran news analyst, writer and pundit, and his efforts in dislodging the 1949 Wilcutts Report on the investigation into the alleged suicide of  former Secretary of Defense James V.  Forrestal, after his fatal fall from the 16th story of the Bethesda (Md.) Naval Hospital have all but proven that Forrestal was murdered. I contacted him in 2008 to tell him about Forrestal’s alleged involvement in the Earhart matter per Thomas E. Devine’s claims, and kept in touch. I was extremely gratified when Martin copied me on an email to an associate and recommended Truth at Last, which he called a “great book.” High praise indeed. Recently he thanked me for prodding him to do “this important work,” ie.,  writing a fine review of Truth at Last.

“Don’t expect any of our mainstream press to be directing you to Campbell’s book, though,” Martin writes in concluding his review.  “If he is to be ignored, it will not be because the case he makes for the capture of Earhart and Noonan by the Japanese is too weak.  It will be because it is too strong.”

My sincere thanks go out to Dave Martin, a member in good standing of a small group of enlightened persons who ascribe to a set of beliefs my friend Frank Benjamin, a Maryland college teacher, calls “MISH,” for Marshall Islands-Saipan Hypothesis. MISH is a cute acronym, but Frank is incorrect about one detail — Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan’s landing in the Marshalls and deaths on Saipan are not a “hypothesis,” but are empirical facts that scream to be acknowledged by our government, still in thrall to the corrupt FDR and his phony legacy.

Just ask the good people of the Republic of the Marshall Islands, who issued a set of four postage stamps in 1987 that depicted various aspects of the ill-fated fliers’ final flight, including the crash of the Electra at Mili Atoll and its recovery by the Japanese survey ship Koshu, events that are common knowledge in that less-sophisticated area of the world.

%d bloggers like this: